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2017 - Leading Learning for Change - AECT Words: 71 words || 
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1. Gu, Jiangyue. and Tao, Terry. "Competency-Based Education for the Workplace: Applied Competency, Authentic Assessment, and Computer-Based Scaffolding" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Leading Learning for Change - AECT, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, Florida, Nov 07, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1263856_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: [Project full name removed] (ULS) is a collaborative, assessment-driven, competency-based micro-credential program designed for the workplace. The purpose of ULS is to provide opportunities for learners to master and advance in competencies related to their professional goals. We developed a competency-based learning model with three key components: applied competencies, authentic assessments, and practice with computer-based scaffolding. We believe these three main components are critical to effective competency-based education in workplace learning.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 488 words || 
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2. Schwartz, David., Cram, Alexandra., Luo, Tana., Vianna, Luiza., Duong, Mylien. and Badaly, Daryaneh. "Disparities between Self-Competence and the Competence of Idealized Peers as a Correlate of Depressive Symptoms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p961076_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: This presentation will examine disparities between real and idealized academic selves as a correlate of depressive symptoms during the adolescent years. We hypothesized that accomplishments or failures in the salient developmental domain of academic competence will have critical implications for distress-related outcomes. We further expect that youths will interpret their experiences with regard to achievement through comparison to peers who they view as representing exemplars of success. That is, youths will consider their own academic functioning relative to classmates that they seek to emulate.

This study was based on the first year of a larger multi-wave investigation. The initial sample included approximately 500 adolescents (gender balanced; average age of 12.7) who attended a middle school located in an ethnically diverse semi-urban neighborhood. A noteworthy feature of this school is a strong orientation toward academic engagement, as evidenced by standardized test scores that are consistently in the top quartile for the state. Thus, students attending this school will likely encounter significant pressures toward achievement.

The participants each completed a peer nomination inventory. They were given a list of consenting classmates and asked to identify peers who fit the following three descriptors: “kids you admire, “kids you respect”, and “kids you want to be like.” These youths also completed a self-report assessment of depressive symptoms. Based on a review of school records, we then calculated grade point averages (GPA) for each adolescent as well as the mean GPA score across peers the adolescents nominated for at least one of the “admire/respect/want to be” like items.

We conducted a regression analysis testing the hypothesis that achievement among admired peers would moderate the link between adolescents own academic competence and depression. Our assumption was that classroom difficulties would be most strongly linked to depression for those youths who viewed high-achieving peers as respected role models. To this end, we specified a model predicting depressive symptoms from the main-effects of gender, ethnicity, adolescents’ GPA, and mean GPA among admired peers; and the two-way interaction between GPA and admired peers’ GPA. Consistent with our hypotheses, we found a significant GPA by admired peers’ GPA interaction, β = -.14, p = .02. Decomposition of this effect revealed that the negative association between GPA and depression increased in magnitude as achievement among admired role model peers moved from low (one SD below the mean), β = -.23, p =.0009 , to average (mean), β = -.36, p < .0001, to high (one SD above the mean), β =-.51, p < .0001.

Our initial findings point to potential associations between social comparison processes and depression during the early adolescent years. An adolescent’s view of his or her own competence in central domains may partially be dependent on match with peers who they view as exemplars of desired attributes. Further analyses will explore the roles of gender and ethnicity in our diverse sample, and will consider longitudinal prediction of changes in depression over time.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 39 words || 
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3. Aksoy, Zuhre. "Competing Ideas, Competing Rights: The Issue of Farmers' Rights in International Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p311634_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The recognition of the significance of biological diversity and the current debate on intellectual property rights at the international arena have brought the struggle over genetic resources to a new level. In this context, the notion of farmers' rights,

2011 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 154 words || 
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4. Hollibaugh, Gary. ""Neutral Competence" or Incompetent Yes-Men?: Beyond the Loyalty-Competence Tradeoff" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 05, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p449597_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In recent years, political scientists have attempted to model the bargaining process that takes place when presidents nominate someone to an important bureaucratic post and the Senate must choose to confirm or reject the nominee. However, most (if not all) models of bureaucratic appointments fail to take into account the political environments in which the confirmation battles take place and the ability of the nominee to do the job for which he or she was chosen. In an attempt to fill this gap in the literature, I build upon the Epstein-O'Halloran (1999) model of bureaucratic appointments and extend it to account for a nominee's competence and exogenous political factors that might otherwise affect the bargaining process. In doing so, I show that the political environment will strongly affect the type of nominees put forth and confirmed in equilibrium, and that conditions exist where incompetent nominees will be preferred over competent nominees and vice versa.

2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 98 words || 
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5. Fraser, Theresa. and Ryba, Nancy. "Adaptive functioning and juvenile competence to stand trial and competence to waive Miranda rights" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, Mar 02, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482560_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The relations between youths’ level of adaptive functioning and competence to stand trial (CST) and competence to waive Miranda rights (CWM) were assessed using the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool – Criminal Adjudication and the Instruments for Assessing Understanding and Appreciation of Miranda Rights. Participants included 39 community youth between the ages of 8-16. A parent or guardian completed the Adaptive Behavior Assessment Scale-II. Although data collection is ongoing, thus far, this study provides some evidence for relations between a youth’s adaptive functioning and his or her CWM. Adaptive functioning, however, does not appear to be important to CST.

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