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2013 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 136 words || 
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1. Dzidic, Peta., Breen, Lauren. and Bishop, Brian. "Are our competencies revealing our weaknesses? A critique of community psychology practice competencies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p652859_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper we argue that the focus on the development and application of practice competencies for community psychology runs the risk of being a distraction from good practice. We outline three areas that demonstrate the inherent flaws in focusing on traditional notions of competencies for community psychology – the limitations of competencies themselves, the schism between competencies and ethics, and the disconnect between competencies and applied practice. In opposition to traditional notions of competencies underpinned by positivist and mechanist notions, we propose that the distinction between virtue and procedural ethics provides a model for comparing and contrasting virtue and procedural competencies. Virtue competencies provide an orientation and value-base that may be applied to any context in which community psychologists work; in this way, competencies may be positioned as tools for understanding, rather than as understandings.

2013 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 50 words || 
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2. Taguchi, Naoko. "Intercultural Competence and Development of Pragmatic Competence in L2 Japanese" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Sheraton Dallas, Dallas, Texas, Mar 16, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p624532_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined the relationship between intercultural competence and gains in pragmatic competence. Twenty international students in a Japanese university completed two measures during a semester study abroad: the Cross-Cultural Adaptability Inventory and a 10-item oral discourse completion test measuring ability to use appropriate Japanese speech style in different situations.

2018 - 42nd National Council for Black Studies Conference Words: 249 words || 
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3. Kent-Smith, Zuri. "The Destruction of Cultural Competence: How the privatization of healthcare and the delivery of culturally-competent care are incompatible" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 42nd National Council for Black Studies Conference, The Westing Buckhead, Atlanta, GA, Mar 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1394409_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This project studies the relationship between private healthcare and the quality of healthcare for minority patients by analyzing the goals and motivations of health insurance companies and the manner in which they fund procedures, while assessing their effects on for-profit health facilities’ delivery of care. I simultaneously evaluate the facilities’ compatibility with meeting the complex needs of minority patients. It is apparent that increased privatization decreases cultural competence, as health insurance and health facilities’ primary goals are increased profits. To offset overhead spending, health insurance companies place costs onto consumers. Additionally, health insurance companies reimburse facilities based on the number of services they provide, a fee-for-service model, resulting in unnecessary procedures that do not address the source of ailments. They continue to capitalize off of health disparities in minority communities, as these communities require more time-consuming, comprehensive healthcare that addresses social determinants. Contrariwise, healthcare providers spend little time addressing their patients’ concerns or addressing their own unconscious biases affecting their ability to practice medicine; they are trying to “treat” as many patients as possible and no attempt is made to build the trust that has been lost due to historical public health and medical atrocities committed against African-Americans, resulting in patients not following through with recommended treatment plans. The patients are never properly treated and are continually pushed through a system that never tackles the source of disease. It is often argued that the privatization increases efficiency and improves the quality of healthcare, but my theoretical framework shows otherwise.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 21 pages || Words: 4961 words || 
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4. Shapiro, Elayne. and Guerin, Ines. "Toward a Model of Family Communication Competence: The Interpersonal Communication Competence Model Revisited" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p246065_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The purpose in developing a family communication competence model was to provide an organizing framework so students can better understand the relationship of various elements that contribute to communication competence. We hope that having a schema to think about the complexity of communication competence within the family context may help students organize their knowledge and guide their aspirations for becoming more competent in their family interactions. Building on the Interpersonal Communication Competence model, this paper lays out the major elements of the model in the family context: criteria, location (context), and components. It also describes how the model was used in a family communication class.

2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 372 words || 
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5. Jaccard, Sylvain. "From Representations of Competence Toward Objectively Observed Competencies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, Jul 15, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p548301_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper (Abstract)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore representations of competence, and objectively observed competencies, that generalist, elementary classroom teachers from the French-speaking schools of the Township of Berne, Switzerland, have with regard to music education. For many years, school-based music education in this region has been the responsibility of elementary classroom teachers. It is thus pertinent to determine whether such teachers have representations of themselves as being competent to deliver this educational content and to investigate to what degree independent observers view them as such. The present study was conducted using a multi-method strategy, involving the triangulation of measures. A questionnaire was proposed to the total population being studied (N = 721) from which 184 teachers replied. From that group, a subsample of 21 teachers agreed to take part in an interview, and 14 members of this subsample agreed to be videotaped while teaching a lesson specifically devised for the purposes of the current study. Three experts in music education independently assessed the teaching competencies of these 14 teachers. Descriptive statistics, correlations and inferential analyses were conducted with data from the questionnaire to describe teachers’ representations of competence in music education relative to other academic domains and to examine the relations between these representations and the observations conducted by the music education experts. Interview content analysis was conducted to elaborate on information obtained with the questionnaire. Results indicate that music education is one of the areas in which generalist teachers feel least competent, especially when they are not called on to teach the subject. However, when they teach in an area (music education included), generalists perceive greater competence. A significant correlation emerged between the assessments of independent experts of music teaching competence and self-reported representations of teaching competence. Of note is that representations of competence are significantly correlated with the musical background and training of participants, whereas assessments by independent experts of teaching competencies are significantly linked to actual personal musical practice. Overall, these results suggest that the model where music education is imparted by generalists is not necessary to be rejected. Rather, the suggestion is made that collaboration between generalists and music specialists may strengthen the quality of elementary school music education by compensating for the vulnerabilities of classroom teachers.

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