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2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 7098 words || 
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1. Brown, Robert. and Bruce, John. "Party Competition and Turnout Revisited: Examining the Competition-Turnout Thesis in a Federal Setting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66148_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The thesis positing a connection between party competition and electoral turnout has reached the status of conventional wisdom in American politics. While we do not argue with the theory itself, we suggest here that its empirical validation is based on a poor connection between measurement and theory. Specifically, previous studies examine the competition-turnout linkage by using state legislative competition measures to explain turnout in presidential and other national elections. We find a theory of state-level party competition driving turnout in national elections to be implausible, and see little reason to believe that competition in low visibility and low salience races would be the mechanism motivating citizens to vote in high salience and high visibility presidential elections. What is lacking for an appropriate examination of this relationship is a suitable measure of national party competition in the states. In previous work (Brown and Bruce, forthcoming) we developed such a measure, and use it here to examine variations in state turnout rates in presidential, senatorial, and U.S. House elections. Our analyses support the conventional wisdom, finding a generally robust relationship between national electoral party competition and national turnout rates across the states. Yet even in supporting the conventional wisdom, our analyses are instructive, as they represent a significant improvement in the link between measurement and theory in the competition-turnout literature.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 11154 words || 
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2. Bloom, Stephen. "Non-competitive Assimilation or Competitive Non-Assimilation? The Political Economy of School Choice in Latvia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65379_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper tests David Laitin's competitive assimilation hypothesis with the aid of Latvian school attendance records. Aggregate data appear to confirm a moderate rise in the number of Russian-speakers sending their children to Latvian schools. Disaggregate data, however, paint a more complicated picture, one which questions a main assumption of the Laitin model. Minority parents do not send their children to Latvian schools in Latvia's economically vibrant cities and continue to opt for education in Russian, despite the apparent economic rewards for knowing Latvian in these cities. I explain this paradoxical outcome by operationalizing and measuring the three variables that Laitin cites as affecting rates of assimilation: economic rewards, in-group status, and out-group acceptance. I then propose an alternative game theoretic framework for analyzing school choice.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 154 words || 
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3. Wood, Brandon. "Bridging Undergraduate Competition and Academic/Non-academic Careers: The Educational and Professional Value of the Current Unwritten Rules in Competitive Communication Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p255149_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Over the past twenty or so years, the importance of drawing rhetorical conclusions/implications as a part of competitive Communication Analysis speeches has waxed significantly. Today, not only are competitors expected to spend a significant amount of time discussing these conclusions, but they are also often expected to provide conclusions which fall into standard categories (conclusions about the method, conclusions about effectiveness, and social conclusions are among the most typical of these). This paper will examine such topics as: (1) historical patterns, (2) the rationales behind including or not including various types of conclusions/implications, (3) the similarity (or lack thereof) between competitive expectations and the demands placed on rhetorical scholars in other contexts (particularly graduate study and peer-reviewed presentations/articles), (4) the effect on the speech in general of emphasizing vs. de-emphasizing the importance of implications/conclusions, and (5) the advantages/disadvantages of placing a high priority of this portion of the competitive composition.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 146 words || 
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4. White, Leah. "Competitive Methods of Explaining Rhetorical Methods: Accuracy vs. Distortion in the Description of Scholarly Research Methods in the Crucible of Competitive Forensics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p255146_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: When compared to the communication analysis speeches of the past, the CA’s of today seem to be spending more time on explaining their methods and drawing their conclusions while spending less and less time actually applying a methodological tool to a rhetorical artifact. This paper will consider this trend in relation to such topics as: (1) the historical evolution of Communication Analysis speeches, (2) the reasons for the reallocation of time/priorities, (3) the impact of this trend on student understanding of the process of conducting rhetorical criticism (and the concurrent ability to conduct meaningful analytic dissection), (4) the difficulty of drawing meaningful conclusions and implications at the end of the speech (and the difficulty of connecting these insights to the application step of the process), and (5) the implications of this trend for students who intend to pursue graduate work in rhetorical criticism.

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1089 words || 
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5. Sobotka, Tagart. "Complicit Competitiveness? Examining the interconnectivity of masculinity and competition in male college students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707188_index.html>
Publication Type: Undergraduate Roundtable Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

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