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2006 - The Law and Society Association Words: 157 words || 
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1. Parker, Christine. "Do Compliance Systems Make a Difference? Testing the Impact of Compliance System Implementation on Compliance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Jul 06, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-11-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p94783_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper reports quantitative results designed to test what impact, if any, the implementation of formal compliance management systems within organizations has on compliance. We argue that it is important to distinguish between the likely impact of implementation of formal compliance systems, attitudes and values towards compliance within the organization and the way compliance is managed in practice. Formal compliance systems and attitudes and values towards compliance are only likely to influence actual compliance to the extent that they work together to influence the way compliance is routinely managed in practice in a firm. We test the relationship between compliance system implementation and compliance in the domain of competition and consumer protection compliance amongst 999 of the largest businesses in Australia. We find evidence that greater implementation of compliance systems is associated with better compliance management in practice within the organizations in our study, and that better compliance management in practice is associated with better compliance outcomes.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 41 pages || Words: 15154 words || 
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2. Gutterman, Ellen. "Corruption and Compliance: Explaining Variations in Compliance with the 1997 OECD Anti-Bribery Convention" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-11-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65518_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What explains variations in state compliance with the 1997 OECD "Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions."? In an initial phase of follow-up monitoring to evaluate each country's implementing legislation, this Convention's peer-review monitoring group found a surprising variation in the compliance records of the OECD's four largest members. While Germany and the United States 'satisfactorily' complied with the Convention, France only 'sufficiently' complied and the United Kingdom did not comply. Why did some states comply and others not? Given the Convention's optimal design, function, and normative basis from the point of view of compliance theory, this outcome is particularly surprising. Employing evidence from research in the fours countries, and focusing on the U.K. case in particular, the paper assesses three alternative explanations for the observed variations in compliance: unintentional non-compliance; strategic trade; and norms related to transnational bribery. The analysis finds that none of the explanations initially suggested by the evidence is complete, but that a combination of strategic trade interests and normative factors is at play. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of this study for compliance theory in IR, and theories of international politics in general.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 35 words || 
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3. Dixon, Gregory. "Compliance in the Fog of Law: The Impact of Institutional Change on Compliance when no one is looking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-11-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p313953_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political leaders must seek political survival at the domestic level. This often creates powerful incentives to break commitments to international institutions. Many of these violations are unobserved as they do not generate observable responses. Thus

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 197 words || 
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4. Murphy, Amy. and Sloas, Lincoln. "The Colors of Compliance: Contingency Management and Client Compliance in a Multi-Site Study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-11-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516090_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: JSTEPS is an implementation study using an adapted Contingency Management (CM) protocol in five federal jurisdictions. Probation clients receive points for compliance with behaviors, such as attending treatment, which they redeem for material and social rewards. Sites were instructed on the principles of CM for developing their point systems, but had broad discretion in determining how clients would earn points. For example, sites were encouraged to emphasize abstinence from drugs/alcohol by allowing clients to accrue points for negative drug tests at a faster rate than for other behaviors, such as attending counseling.

Data on compliance are tracked through a software program that was developed for the project. The software color codes behaviors: red behaviors are abstaining from criminal activity; orange behaviors are abstinence from drugs/alcohol; yellow behaviors are those supporting abstinence, such as attending AA/NA; and green behaviors are long-term goals supporting recovery, such as obtaining a GED. In this paper, we review the early data from the software and discuss compliance across sites. We examine whether various characteristics of site point schemes, such as types of behaviors emphasized (“orange” vs. “yellow” vs. “green”) and frequency with which rewards were delivered, were associated with different rates of compliance.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Lindsey, Nathan. and Carpenter, Christopher. "Encouraging Greater Compliance: Combining the “But You Are Free” Compliance-Gaining Technique and Positive Face" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-13 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1228502_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present study examines the effectiveness of the “but you are free” (BYAF) compliance gaining technique, and enhances the effectiveness of the appeal by utilizing politeness theory (Brown & Levinson, 1987). The BYAF differs from other compliance gaining techniques requiring sequential requests, namely the foot-in-the-door (FITD) and the door-in-the-face (DITF) techniques (Freedman & Fraser, 1966). Instead of using a sequence of requests to encourage compliance, the BYAF technique linguistically includes a reminder that the receiver of the request is free to refuse the request, argued to work by mitigating psychological reactance (Brehm, 1966). To encourage greater compliance, the present study experimentally examined the inclusion of a positive face component (i.e., “but, I would really appreciate it), to the traditional BYAF request. Results indicate the combined request encourage the greatest level of compliance, compared to a direct request, or requests that incorporated only the BYAF, or positive face components.

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