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2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Perone, Angela. "Compton's Cafeteria Riot: Collective Action and Transformational Empowerment among Hypermarginalized Gender Nonconforming Communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119401_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During an August evening in 1966, a group of queer youth, drag queens, and transsexual hustlers rioted after police officers tried to eject a drag queen eating at Compton’s Cafeteria, an all-night diner in a poor inner-city neighborhood of San Francisco. In response, the drag queen threw coffee in the officer’s face, and a riot quickly ensued. Within a few months of this riot, the first affirming support services emerged by and for gender nonconforming people as an identity group.

By building on theoretical contributions from resource mobilization, collective identity, and collective empowerment, this paper seeks to understand how and why social change happens among hypermarginalized communities by focusing on a case study of the Compton’s Cafeteria Riot. Through extensive archival research and theoretical analysis, this paper seeks to answer the following questions: (1) How and why did a group of hypermarginalized individuals collectively mobilize for change despite numerous systems of oppression; and (2) How did this riot prompt the first affirming support services by and for gender nonconforming people as a collective group?

2016 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 367 words || 
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2. Guerrero, Lisa. "From Compton to Negrotown: Blackness and the Dystopic Utopias of Home" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Denver, Colorado, <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1134616_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: In the second decade of the 21st century the epistemological value of the myth of the “post-race” nation has become entrenched in the minds of many Americans. This has resulted in the “post-race” effect where, in the apparent absence of race we have witnessed an aggressive rejuvenation of racially motivated violences against communities of color, racist discourse, and the attack on policies and institutions set up to protect the rights of people of color in the United States. As the “post-race” era continues to unfold black life has become increasingly defined through black death. This 21st century ontological blackness that is grounded in black mortality has created a significant shift in black cultural production as black artists work to imagine spaces and modes in which to articulate a black rage, rescue a black humanity, and build new senses of home and belonging.

In this presentation I am interested in considering what I am calling the dystopic utopias of home created by black artists in the 21st century. In these dystopic utopias the idealizations of home are forged out of the degradation and fear of black social realities. Placing the video for Kendrick Lamar’s “Alright” against the Key & Peele satiric sketch “Negrotown” we are able to see how these dystopic utopias are imagined differently, while they share a similar black speculative affect. This black speculative affect is both forward and backward looking, and is identitifed through expressions of hopeful mourning, or alternatively, mournful hope. It stems from having to create what Robin D.G. Kelley has called “freedom dreams” out of both the promise of “what if” and the pain of “what is.” In these two examples the artists, working in different cultural genres, have created new millennial black visions of home that are defined by a twinned belonging and longing, and interrogate the consequences of living in a society that protests the significance of race even as it requires that you live within the confines of race. These creative productions necessarily disrupt traditional notions of home in order to simultaneously critique the ways in which the post-racial imagination has razed the ontological homes of blackness, as well as build new ones for blackness to move into.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 72 words || 
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3. Corsaro, Nicholas. and Wilson, Jeremy. "The Effects of Police Consolidation on Crime and Homicide: Examining the Impact in Compton, California" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1148715_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: The City of Compton transitioned from relying on the former Compton Police Department to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Office for police services in 2000. The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential changes in crime rates in Compton between 1985 to 2013, accounting for the changes in police agencies during the transition period. Preliminary analyses suggest the City of Compton retained stable crime rate changes during the consolidation period.

2017 - The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 150 words || 
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4. Johnson, Amber. "Straight Outa Erasure: The Discursive and Embodied Invisibility of Black Women in Straight Outa Compton." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 17, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1240835_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Straight Outa Compton stirred national interest as a biopic of one of Hip Hop’s most influential rap groups, NWA. While some joked that NWA stood for No Women Allowed, there is much truth to be seen in the incarnation of a grand narrative detailing the creation and eventual fame of the rap group without highlighting the women germane to the group’s success. The author coded the film using hyperinvisibility and the rhetorical power of nostalgia as theoretical frameworks. Themes indicate that nostalgia serves as a conveyor belt for erasing black women’s narratives, resulting in a cycle of hyperinvisibility. The author then used hip hop feminism as a lens to analyze counter narratives told by women of color via social media and a full length feature film by Michel’le. These clapbacks serve as alternate truths situated within lived experience that paint a more fuller nostalgic gesture towards misogynoir and intersectional power.

2017 - BEA Words: 130 words || 
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5. Pluskota, Jonathan. and Johnson, Phylis. "From Compton to X: Radio’s Community Role in Times of Protest and Unrest" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1212804_index.html>
Publication Type: General Paper Submission
Abstract: 25 years ago, the Rodney King verdict triggered widespread riots in South Central Los Angeles. Centered in the controversy was KJLH, a minority-owned, community centric station whose role would become a beacon of hope at a time of struggle and civil unrest. From the ashes of South Central, the role of the station continued to broadcast the story of decades-old oppression. Twenty-five years later, community protests have erupted across the country in response to the unnecessary killings of minority men and women. In the case of Ferguson, MO, WHHL's broadcast mirrored the role of KJLH 22 years prior. This paper examines the role of radio as a community voice, disseminating the thoughts, feelings, and emotions of areas embroiled in ciivl unrest and protest within the context of KJLH and WDIA.

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