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2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Xu, Kun. and Liao, Tony. "Cue the Future: Bridging Computer-Mediated Communication and Human-Computer Interaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1365239_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the advent of computing machines, scholars have theorized about the relationship between humans and computers, how people interact with computers, how people interact with one another utilizing computers, and the implications of these machines for the society. Computer-mediated communication (CMC) and human-computer interaction (HCI) are two fields that have made important contributions in understanding the role of computers in communication. With the rise of new multimedia, multisensory, and interactive computing systems, this paper suggests that theories from these fields need to be integrated to inform research about the new media environment. We first provide an overview of how CMC and HCI have evolved in the past few decades. Secondly, we propose a typology of how these fields have conceptualized key concepts like cues and social presence that can help researchers parse out ways of approaching new media technologies. Lastly, we examine several ways that new computing technologies illuminate a need to draw from both perspectives in the discourse regarding humans and computers.

2003 - International Communication Association Pages: 14 pages || Words: 3502 words || 
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2. Cai, Li., Prabu, David., Lu, Tingting., Liu, Kaiya., Cortese, Juliann. and Seo, Mihye. "Testing the Boundaries of the Media Equation in a Computer Game Situation: When an Evaluation by a Human Means More Than an Evaluation by a Computer" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p111675_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine some of the boundary conditions of the Media Equation hypothesis, which states that people treat media like real-life. To test this, participants were made to believe that their opponent in a computer game of air hockey was a human or a computer agent. With this manipulation we had predicted that a positive evaluation by a human would be considered more accurate than a positive evaluation by a computer. The data amply support this prediction. We had also predicted that respondents would resist a negative evaluation by a human more than they would a negative evaluation by a computer, in an effort to save face. The data, however, do not support this contention. The viability of social presence as an explanatory mechanism was examined. The results were encouraging, though not overwhelmingly in favor of a strong role of social presence, at least in the form in which it is conceptualized in this paper.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 10218 words || 
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3. Liu, Xun. and Larose, Robert. "Computers Are People, Too: A New Perspective of Human-Computer Interaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172721_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study extended the computers as social actors perspective and further asked the question: What kind of relationship people have developed with their computers. An online survey was conducted with 86 college students participated. The findings indicated that people might develop diverse relationships with their computers. The computer-computer relationship types identified in this study were: social relationship, working relationship, acquaintance, mixed relationship and enemy. The natures of these relationships were: warm, love-hate, neutral and cold. People also developed emotional ties with their computers. The interactions between human-computer relationship type, human-computer relationship nature, computer use and computer activities were examined. The finding suggested that human-computer relationship type and nature do influence computer use. This study proposed a new perspective on human-computer interaction. Theoretical and practical implications were discussed.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Prahl, Andrew. and Van Swol, Lyn. "The Computer Said I Should: How Does Receiving Advice From a Computer Differ From Receiving Advice From a Human?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1108590_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates the process of receiving advice from a non-human advisor, specifically a computer advisor. Theory and previous research from interpersonal advice, forecasting, and human-automation interaction are reviewed to inform hypotheses. An experiment is conducted to assess the differences between interpersonal human-human and computer-human advice. Neither advisor was utilized more than the other on average, but after receiving bad advice, advice from computer advisors was used significantly less than advice from human advisors. Advice recipients did not report differing emotional reactions to receiving advice from computer or human advisors, but recipients did report a greater sense of similarity with human advisors. Results are discussed in light of past advice and human-computer interaction research and future research areas are identified.

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