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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 10 pages || Words: 2941 words || 
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1. McFarland, David. "Social Networks for Computing Advice: William F. Ogburn and Equipment Selection for an Early Computational Laboratory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110726_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Ogburn used his social networks to obtain advice on selecting computational equipment for the University of Chicago's new Social Science Research Building in 1929. This was, of course, pre-internet, but one who strongly influenced Ogburn was Lord Kelvin, who had been knighted for his contribution to development of an earlier network that included transatlantic telegraph cables.

2012 - AWP Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 287 words || 
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2. Martinez Alpizar, David., Yu, Chen-Hui., Amezquita, Christina., Nehman, Nathalie., Cortina Swanson, Xochitl. and Luciana, Lagana`. "Demographics and Computer-Related Factors Predicting Computer Self-Efficacy among Ethnically Diverse Older Adults." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AWP Annual Conference, Palm Springs Hilton, Palm Springs, CA, Mar 08, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p550336_index.html>
Publication Type: POSTER
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A hierarchical multiple regression tested hypothesized predictors of computer self-efficacy in a community-dwelling sample of ethnically diverse older adults. Step 1 found gender and income accounted for over 9% of variance, while step 2 results indicated that having previous experience accounted for about 16% of variance in computer self-efficacy.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Xu, Kun. and Liao, Tony. "Cue the Future: Bridging Computer-Mediated Communication and Human-Computer Interaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1365239_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since the advent of computing machines, scholars have theorized about the relationship between humans and computers, how people interact with computers, how people interact with one another utilizing computers, and the implications of these machines for the society. Computer-mediated communication (CMC) and human-computer interaction (HCI) are two fields that have made important contributions in understanding the role of computers in communication. With the rise of new multimedia, multisensory, and interactive computing systems, this paper suggests that theories from these fields need to be integrated to inform research about the new media environment. We first provide an overview of how CMC and HCI have evolved in the past few decades. Secondly, we propose a typology of how these fields have conceptualized key concepts like cues and social presence that can help researchers parse out ways of approaching new media technologies. Lastly, we examine several ways that new computing technologies illuminate a need to draw from both perspectives in the discourse regarding humans and computers.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 150 words || 
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4. Foster, David. "Can the General Theory of Crime Account for Computer Offenders: Testing Low Self Control as a Predictor of Computer Crime Offending" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p32741_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Abstract: Using self-report measures of attitudinal and behavioral self-control, this study tests the applicability of Gottfredson and Hirschi’s theory of low self-control as it applies to self-reported computer crime offending among a college student sample. Computer crime was found to be relatively common, with more than ninety-five percent of the sample reported having engaged in some form of illegal computer activity. The results offer moderate support for Gottfredson and Hirschi’s general theory of crime, finding direct and positive effects for self-control and opportunity on computer offending, but not for the interaction between self-control and opportunity. The prevalence of computer-related offending is discussed in the context of the growing need to address the serious and widespread nature of computer crime. The study concludes by discussing the empirical and theoretical fit between the components of low self control, opportunity, and computer crime, as well as directions for future research.

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