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2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 33 pages || Words: 7573 words || 
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1. Gong, Li. "How social is social responses to computers?: The function of the degree of anthropomorphism in computer representations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p191651_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Testing the assumption that more anthropomorphism in computer representations elicits more social responses from people, a between-participants experiment (N=168) manipulated 12 computer agents to represent four levels of anthropomorphism: low, medium, high, and real human images. Social responses were assessed with usersÂ’ social judgment and homophily perception of the agents, conformity in a social choice dilemma task, and competency and trustworthiness ratings of the agents. Linear polynomial trend analyses revealed significant linear trends for almost all the measures. As the agent became more anthropomorphic to being human, it received more social responses from users.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Prahl, Andrew. and Van Swol, Lyn. "The Computer Said I Should: How Does Receiving Advice From a Computer Differ From Receiving Advice From a Human?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1108590_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates the process of receiving advice from a non-human advisor, specifically a computer advisor. Theory and previous research from interpersonal advice, forecasting, and human-automation interaction are reviewed to inform hypotheses. An experiment is conducted to assess the differences between interpersonal human-human and computer-human advice. Neither advisor was utilized more than the other on average, but after receiving bad advice, advice from computer advisors was used significantly less than advice from human advisors. Advice recipients did not report differing emotional reactions to receiving advice from computer or human advisors, but recipients did report a greater sense of similarity with human advisors. Results are discussed in light of past advice and human-computer interaction research and future research areas are identified.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 10 pages || Words: 2941 words || 
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3. McFarland, David. "Social Networks for Computing Advice: William F. Ogburn and Equipment Selection for an Early Computational Laboratory" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110726_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Ogburn used his social networks to obtain advice on selecting computational equipment for the University of Chicago's new Social Science Research Building in 1929. This was, of course, pre-internet, but one who strongly influenced Ogburn was Lord Kelvin, who had been knighted for his contribution to development of an earlier network that included transatlantic telegraph cables.

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