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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 2844 words || 
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1. Nippert-Eng, Christena. and Melican, Jay. "Concealment and Disclosure: Wallets, Purses and Identity Work in Modern Societies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108726_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we analyze the contents of 48 wallets and purses belonging to 72 individuals who participated in interviews for “Islands of Privacy,” an extensive, original study of how people think about privacy and what is private. Along with related comments from all study participants and the insights of a previous study of wallet and purse contents we offer a way of understanding how people use wallets and purses as “identity kits.” These kits clearly constitute an important and flexible collection of tools that are used to help negotiate the constraints of Modern society. Thus, wallets and purses provide an opportunity to learn more about how people manage the boundary between what is private and what is public, especially regarding aspects of their self-identity.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 30 pages || Words: 8531 words || 
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2. Malkowski, Jennifer. "Testing Positive for a Concealable Identity: Rhetorical Identification as an Invitation to Cope" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p257784_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The online forum “HPV”, found on the website positivesingles.com (2007), was examined in order to better understand the empowering aspects of this technology. Responses to forum threads were analyzed as to discern how people with a sexually transmitted disease communicate about their diagnoses in order to gain control over their situation. Members were found to engage in three rhetorical strategies used to cope via identification with other members: (a) victimization, (b) self-determination, and (c) responsibility.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 45 pages || Words: 16024 words || 
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3. Henripin, Olivier. "Incentives to Misrepresent, Incentives to Reveal, and Incentives to Conceal: Demonstrations of Private Information in International Bargaining" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p416542_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper argues that the mainstream rationalist literature has too easily dismissed demonstration as a viable communication mechanism during international disputes. In the bargaining model developed herein, the uncertainty of one of the two disputants regarding its likelihood of victory in war can be dispelled by its rival through a costly demonstration of military capabilities before bargaining begins. The bargaining process is represented very simply as an ultimatum game in which the respective role of each disputant as the “challenger” or “defender” is determined randomly. Results show that asymmetric information persists only when the fully informed state is sufficiently confident that it will assume the role of the “defender” and when the military costs of demonstrating capabilities are sufficiently high. More generally, the results also suggest that the canonical understanding of the asymmetric information problem (Fearon 1995) should be amended. In a wide variety of circumstances, incentives to misrepresent do not account for the persistence of private information in conflict bargaining, which results more fundamentally from a complete lack of incentives to reveal private information. More precisely, in the model, a state with no bargaining power (or proposal power), or whose private information concerns only private values (i.e., its value for war) has no incentives at all to reveal this information. The explanatory importance of incentives to misrepresent reappears, however, when a state possesses some bargaining power and has private information about common values (i.e., its military capabilities), but only under the condition that demonstration is too costly or impracticable.

2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 105 words || 
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4. Ben-Shakhar, Gershon. "Algorithms for the detection of concealed information (CIT) from groups when the specific critical information is not available" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482639_index.html>
Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: We examined whether the CIT can be used when the critical details are unavailable to the investigators (the Searching CIT - SCIT). Algorithms designed to detect the critical items and classify individuals in the SCIT were examined. These algorithms are based on averaging responses across subject to identify critical items and then averaging responses across critical items to identify knowledgeable subjects and on clustering methods based on correlations between the response profiles of different subjects. Reanalysis of three data sets from previous CIT studies demonstrated that differentiation between knowledgeable and unknowledgeable subjects in the SCIT approached the differentiation obtained in the standard CIT.

2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 94 words || 
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5. Gamer, Matthias. "Probing the concealed information test under realistic conditions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482637_index.html>
Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: The current studies examined the influence of memory processes on the physiological response pattern in the Concealed Information Test (CIT). Participants carried out a mock crime and incidentally encoded several central and peripheral details. A subsequently performed CIT revealed that even in the absence of differences in explicit memory, central details led to larger autonomic responses. Emotional arousal during the mock crime did not modulate this response pattern. The P300 amplitude of event-related brain potentials seemed to be less affected by such differences in processing depth and provided incremental validity for detecting concealed knowledge.

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