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2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 11627 words || 
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1. Ochoa Espejo, Paulina. "Does Political Theology Entail Decisionism? On the Relation of the concept of Sovereignty to different conceptions of God in Christianity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210995_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The thesis of political theology holds that all justificatory theories of the state embrace some metaphysical assumptions, rather than just empirical facts, and accepted political conventions. The thesis is relevant because it challenges liberal justifications resting on individual autonomy and self-foundation. The thesis is also controversial because many theorists, liberals and poststructuralist alike, believe that metaphysical assumptions introduce decisionism to the theory of the state. But, does political theology entail decisionism? This paper argues that decisionism –the view that a state depends on the unrestrained personal decision of a ruler-- does not follow necessarily from political theology, because metaphysical assumptions need not correspond to theological views analogous to secular decisionism, and a specific idea of metaphysics need not prevail in the process of secularization. This conclusion challenges the view that the modern state is at its core a continuation of Christian hopes and beliefs, but it should and put at ease those who are weary of discussing metaphysics in normative political theory.

2004 - North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Pages: 7 pages || Words: 3319 words || 
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2. Hitt, Fernando. "Teachers’ conceptions related to differential calculus’ concepts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Delta Chelsea Hotel, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Oct 21, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p117540_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Our aim on this paper is to show teachers’ conceptions in connection with some concepts of differential calculus. We discuss about teachers’ conceptions and reconstruction of knowledge. Participants are studying a master degree program in mathematics education and we worked with them during one year in a cooperative learning environment designed in a special way. We would like to discuss here only 12 sessions related to differential calculus out of the whole course. That is, first, discussion in small groups; second, a discussion with the whole class (scientific debate methodology); and third, individual reflection was required as homework (auto-reflection in Hadamard’s sense). Our theoretical approach was related to the role of representations in the construction of mathematical concepts and the notion of conception as important phase on the construction or reconstruction of mathematical concepts.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 44 pages || Words: 10097 words || 
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3. Kline, Susan., Zhang, Shuangyue., Horton, Brian., Ryu, Sung Jin. and Pariyadath, Renu. "Theorizing the Role of Relational Communication and Cultural Concepts in Marital Roles and Marriage Conceptions: Comparisons Between Asian and U.S. Young Adults" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300843_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Our study examined the propositions that mate preferences embody historical concepts that differ by culture, but that mate preferences also embody cross-cultural similarities based upon people's needs for effective relational communication with their marriage partners. Extending both theory and methods employed in mate preference research, 184 young adults from the US, China, South Korea, Japan, and India, responded to a series of open-ended questions. Analytic induction procedures were used to create categories across six topics (good wife/bad wife, good husband/bad husband, good marriage/bad marriage. Some cultural concepts were identified in the reported gender and cultural differences: for US adults a wive should be loving and not untrustworthy, a husband should not be selfish, unfaithful or hurtful; a good marriage is characterized by giving and a bad marriage by untrustworthiness and poor communication. By contrast, in Asian cultures a good husband or wife provided for the family, a bad husband was irresponsible, and good marriages were marked by mutual respect. As hypothesized, relational communication characteristics were more important than attractiveness/ability characteristics acorss the five cultures. Sex differences were also detected, and knowledge of some dispreferred characteristics were valued more than preferred characteristics (like unfaithfulness). Most importantly, both propositions received support.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Blakely-McClure, Sarah. and Ostrov, Jamie. "Relational Aggression, Victimization and Self-Concept: Understanding Pathways to Low Self-Concept" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p950253_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Sequential Social Process Model of Peer Harassment posits that aggression leads to peer victimization and negative social self-perceptions (Boivin & Hymel, 1997). Previous research has found support for this model (Boivin, Hymel, & Hodges, 2001). Previous findings have also shown relational aggression predicts victimization and subsequent negative general self-concept for adolescents (Prinstein, Boegers, & Vernberg, 2001). There is a need to further replicate and extend findings of this pathway to domain specific (e.g., academic) self-concept.

Using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development a secondary analysis was conducted to examine the unique contributions of relational aggression in the fifth grade and victimization in the sixth grade predicting lower self-concept for adolescents’ (i.e., 15-years-old) in three key domains: academic, sports, and physical appearance. Social support and gender were examined as moderators of this pathway. A large sample (N = 775; 388 girls; M = 11.14 years in 5th grade) and multiple informants (teacher-, child-, and parent-report) were used to test several theoretically driven hypotheses. Teachers reported on each child’s relational and physical aggression using the Children’s Social Behavior Scale (Crick, 1996). Both physical and relational aggression were reliable (α > .70). Peer physical and relational victimization measures for sixth grade were reported by mothers using a measure adapted from Crick, Bigbee and Howes (1996) and Kochenderfer and Ladd (1996). Three items assessed relational victimization and physical victimization respectively. There was low internal consistency for physical victimization (α = .66); however, relational victimization was reliable (α = .79). Academic and sport self-concept were reported by children in the sixth grade and adolescence on the “How I Do In School” Scale, which was adapted from Cook, Church, Ajanuka, Shadish, Jeong-Ran and Cohen (1996) as well as Eccles and Midgley (1989). All scales for both sixth grade and age 15 demonstrated acceptable reliability (α’s >.70). Self-reports of self-concept for physical appearance for Age 15 were adapted from the Self Perceptions Profile for Adolescents (Harter, 1988). Items showed good reliability (α = .91) at both times. Child self-reports of social support from peers in the fifth grade were from a 10-item scale adapted from the Perceptions of Peer Social Support Scale (PPSSS; Ladd, Kochenderfer & Coleman, 1996) and was reliable (α = .92).

Indirect effects modeling with bias-corrected bootstrap confidence intervals (5,000 samples) was used to test the hypotheses. A significant direct effect emerged, such that relational aggression was found to negatively predict academic self-concept when controlling for gender, initial physical aggression in the fifth grade, physical victimization in the sixth grade and initial academic self-concept. Thus, relational aggression was associated with decreases in academic self-concept. Contrary to hypotheses indirect effects were not found. Both social support and gender were nonsignificant moderators. The results are notable given the novel direct effect that was present over 5 years. When examining a general self-concept composite, there was no association between aggression and self-concept. Thus, our findings highlight the utility of examining domain specific self-concept.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10118 words || 
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5. Eidlin, Fred. "Concepts as Depth-probes, Concepts as Inquiry-blockers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p725073_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Concepts shape and guide thought, both fruitfully and unfruitfully. Sometimes concepts lead inquiry to previously unimagined depths. Sometimes, they lead astray, or block thought and prevent inquiry from going anywhere. Sometimes the most penetrating and fruitful of concepts become inquiry blockers. And all concepts, even the most penetrating and fruitful, block as well as probing, depending on the circumstances. What it is that makes some concepts and frameworks serve as depth probes, while others impede inquiry? What is it that makes some concepts and frameworks depth probes under certain conditions, and inquiry blockers under other conditions? The present paper explores the roles concepts, frameworks, and methods play in capturing reality and preventing its capture. It explores the conditions under which concepts that have served as depth-probes may turn into inquiry-blockers. It suggests practical guidelines for becoming aware of the qualities that distinguish depth probing concepts from inquiry blocking concepts, and which distinguish fruitful from degenerating research programs. Finally, by way of illustration, the analytical instruments developed in the paper are applied to three specific examples of conceptual blockage in political science and political theory — problems arising in the study of democracy, power, and totalitarianism.

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