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2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 9333 words || 
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1. Shin, Jae-Hwa. "Self-Concerned Strategy and Other-Concerned Strategy: Conflict Management Strategies of Public Relations Practitioners and Journalists" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113363_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study showed dual concerns of public relations practitioners and journalists in the conflictual and strategic source-reporter relationship. A survey of 641 public relations practitioners and journalists showed the differences in agreement, congruency and accuracy regarding their conflict management strategies. Public relations practitioners reported that they employ ‘other-corned strategy’ more than self-concerned strategy possibly from their need for placement in print or on the air, while journalists are likely to employ ‘self-concerned strategy’ more than self-concerned strategy with self-efficacy representing that they are independent from any source and maintain the reporter’s credibility.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 6356 words || 
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2. Haider-Markel, Donald. "The Politics of Fear: Personal Concern and Perception of Public Concern about Terrorist Attacks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p141154_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The political consequences of self- interest and its counterpart social concern have long been an interest to social scientists, especially as these concepts relate to the economy. However, this literature rarely looks beyond the economy, and no existing studies have examined these concepts in the context of terrorism and counter-terrorism policy. Our research, therefore, asks the following questions: Does personal concern about becoming a victim of terrorism influence attitudes about government policies directed at combating terrorism? Do perceptions about the public’s concerns of terrorism affect such policies? More importantly, which concern is the strongest predictor of policy attitudes? We utilize individual level survey data collected during the fall of 2001 to examine these questions. Our results indicate that perceptions of public concerns are the strongest and most consistent predictor of policy attitudes about terrorism. The implications for theory about perceptions of public opinion and the competing role of personal and social interest are discussed.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 124 words || 
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3. Alt, James., Jensen, Amalie., Larreguy, Horacio., Lassen, David. and Marshall, John. "Contagious political concerns: Identifying unemployment concern peer effects using the Danish population network" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 07, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1074681_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The identification of peer effects in politically-relevant contexts faces formidable empirical challenges. To identify how concerns about unemployment impact one's peers, we exploit an innovative design in an extraordinarily rich data environment. Using administrative data covering the entire Danish population over 38 consecutive years between 1985 and 2011, we are able to characterize a voter's social network according to familial, educational and vocational ties. Combining this with a panel political survey, we leverage unemployment shocks to friends of friends in the context of a two-sample instrumental variables design. Our initial results provide considerable evidence of unemployment concern peer effects. We find that a standard deviation increase in a peer's unemployment concerns increase an individual's own concern by around a quarter of a standard deviation.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 7992 words || 
Info
4. Neuberger, Lindsay., Silk, Kami., Yun, Doshik., Bowman, Nicholas. and Anderson, Jennifer. "Concern as Motivation for Protection: An Investigation of Mothers’ Concern About Their Daughters’ Breast Cancer Risk" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p299298_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current study utilized a survey of mothers with daughters (N=256) to investigate how mothers’ concern about their daughters’ breast cancer risk influenced intentions to engage in preventive behaviors. Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) is used as a basis for the proposed Concern as Motivation for Protection (CMP) model, which suggests that self-efficacy, response efficacy and level of concern influence protective behavioral intentions in distinct ways. Results from regression analyses indicate that self-efficacy, response efficacy, and mothers’ concern are significant predictors of intentions to engage in preventive behaviors with daughters. Additionally, a content analysis of mothers’ open-ended reasons for their concern about their daughters’ breast cancer risk reveals trends that vary by concern level and specific comment valence. Campaign implications are discussed and directions for future research are presented.

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