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2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 38 pages || Words: 10326 words || 
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1. Hines, Eric. "To Confer or not to Confer: An Event Count Analysis of the Use of Conference Committees in the US Congress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p86039_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is no established rule for the frequency of conference committees in Congress. This paper uses findings about conference outcomes to develop an informal theory of their use. The theory is tested using data from the 75th-107th Congresses.

2011 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9135 words || 
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2. Hill, Denise. ""Race Conference Meets In Atlanta": Public Relations for the NAACP's First Conference in the South, 1920" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520008_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since its founding in 1909, the NAACP employed a number of public relations strategies and tactics to communicate its primary objective, which was: “to uplift the Negro men and women of this country by securing for them the complete enjoyment of their rights as citizens, justice in the courts, and equal opportunities in every economic, social, and political endeavor in the United States” More specifically, the NAACP wanted to “stamp out the evils of race prejudice practiced against the Negro in America in the form of lynching, disfranchisement, Jim-Crowism, unequal industrial and educational opportunities, and other such disabilities.” In 1920, the NAACP decided to hold its first conference in the south. The NAACP believed its first conference in the South, to be held in Atlanta, would be a watershed moment, and its leaders wanted to ensure that it was effectively employing public relations for the conference to further its cause.
This study explores how the NAACP used public relations for its eleventh annual conference, and how those public relations activities fit within previously linear models of public relations history.

2010 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Pages: unavailable || Words: 364 words || 
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3. Cameron, Alan. "Instrumental Music Lessons Delivered via Video Conference to Remote Schools in Scotland - (V & I Forum Pre-Conference)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, China Conservatory of Music (CC) and Chinese National Convention Centre (CNCC), Beijing, China, Aug 01, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p397831_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Young people in rurally isolated Scottish primary and secondary schools currently receive instrumental music lessons via videoconference on a weekly basis. Lessons have been provided every week since November 2005 in remote schools in Dumfries & Galloway, in southwest Scotland. This presentation will demonstrate the effectiveness of the teaching program through lesson delivery by videoconference. The project has been evaluated by the Centre for Education & Industry at Warwick University, England and a summary of aims, methods, findings and conclusions follow.

The purpose and aim of the project was to assess: 1. the overall impact of the project on participating pupils; 2. the impact the project has had on the musical skills of the pupils involved; 3. the impact on motivation to learn a musical instrument and attitudes to music; and 4.the overall cost effectiveness of delivering instrumental tuition by video conferencing. The research adopted a qualitative approach in order to collect a wide range of evidence from project participants. In addition to in-depth interviews with the project manager, instrumental tutor and technical support consultant, the evaluation team undertook a review of the project structure and relevant resources.

Pupils appear to be making progress on a par with or better than they would have done in “normal” instrumental lessons. No pupils or teachers have encountered difficulties in learning to operate the videoconference technologies. The project has nurtured children’s self-esteem, respect for others, and positive interdependence through the emphasis on cooperative learning in small groups. In particular, there has been a strong move towards student autonomy. Pupils are making excellent progress in instrumental technique and are conscious of the importance of regular practice. Learning an instrument by videoconference is highly motivating to pupils; this is reflected in the exceptionally low dropout rate at all schools. Once Broadband connectivity is fully available, instrumental music tuition via videoconferencing should become a fully cost effective method of delivery, in that costs associated with transport and travel time for tutors will virtually disappear and tutors will have the capacity to teach a far greater number of children on a weekly basis than is currently the case.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 34 pages || Words: 15032 words || 
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4. Rozzi, Alan. "Who Goes to Conference: The Role of Partisanship in the Selection of House Conference Delegates in the post-reform era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360687_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study offers several original insights into House speakers' selections of majority caucus conference delegates during the period 1979-2004. First, it demonstrates that when conference delegations proved unrepresentative of the majority caucus, they were almost always more ideologically extreme, suggesting a systematic directional bias to speakers' decisions. Second, the study incorporates more actors into the analysis. Controlling for such conventional factors as membership on originating committees and subcommittees, tenure in the House, and support for the bill in question, it adds variables measuring the preferences of the president and the Senate in order to more fully model the heightened partisan nature of the national governing process. The study employs both aggregated and disaggregated data, as well as difference of medians tests and logistic regressions. The results indicate that partisan factors from both inside and outside the House chamber have increasingly influenced speakers' choices of majority caucus conference delegates. In short, speakers more routinely encroached upon standing committees' traditional prerogatives when determining who represent their caucus in conference negotiations.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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5. Brady, Michael. "A Party in the Conference Room: The Implications of Conditional Party Government for Conference Committee Bargaining" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152931_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

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