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2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Bell, Elizabeth. "Are Social Constructions Universal?: Uncovering Heterogeneity in Social Construction of Target Populations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1348415_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on a nation-wide experimental survey, I investigate whether there is heterogeneity based on individual characteristics such as race and ideology in public adherence to the hypotheses put forth by social construction of target populations.

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Aitamurto, Tanja. and Varma, Anita. "The Constructive Role of Journalism: Contentious Metadiscourse on Constructive Journalism and Solutions Journalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1366022_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper analyzes the normative roles of constructive journalism and solutions journalism by analyzing metajournalistic discourse about these two rising forms of alternative journalism. The findings show that constructive and solutions journalism are defined similarly: they are claimed to follow traditional journalistic norms and practices, even as they shift focus from problems to solutions. The metajournalistic discourse reveals a tension about the normative roles of journalism. Constructive journalism and solutions journalism justify their existence by the intensified need to solve vexing social issues. At the same time, they distance themselves from being advocates for social good, and instead insist that they are objectively covering solutions without endorsing them. This strategic rhetoric signals an attempt to draw a sharp line between constructive journalism and advocacy, and to situate constructive journalism within the boundaries of a traditional monitorial role of journalism. Metadiscourse about constructive journalism reveals reluctance to acknowledge and articulate its normative constructive role that seeks to help society.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6920 words || 
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3. Dixon, Shane. and Quirke, Linda. "Construction Work: The Social Construction of “Work” in Canadian Introductory Sociology Textbooks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p649935_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the textual coverage of the topic of work in Canadian English-language introductory sociology textbooks. Our findings are based on a content analysis of 21 Canadian texts published between 2008 and 2012. We found that only 12 of 21 textbooks included a chapter on work, suggesting that work occupies a peripheral position in Canadian sociology texts. Most chapters on work discussed economic systems, economic sectors (i.e. secondary and service) and major transitions in the world of work over the past two generations. However, topics such as service sector work were given a disproportionate share of attention, while others (i.e. workplace injury) were given short shrift. Textbook portrayals of content such as manufacturing work were frequently characterized by a lack of nuance. These findings highlight a gap between the sociology of work, and the social construction of the "sociology of work" in many Canadian introductory sociology textbooks.

2008 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 432 words || 
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4. Fitzgerald, Maureen. "Sovereignty and Social Justice: 21st-Century Immigrant Activism and the Construction (or de-construction) of the Nation State." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Oct 16, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243451_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: On May 1, 2006, millions of immigrants in America, primarily the undocumented, went on strike from jobs and schools and marched in protest of current and potential immigration laws that threatened deportation, kept the undocumented without civil liberties, and risked the break-up of families containing some citizens (usually children) and their parents. Called “A Day Without Immigrants,” the protests were unprecedented in American History, revealing a massive but vulnerable population willing to identify themselves publicly in white shirts, signifying non-violence and, not insignificantly, a transnational virtue that has long been understood in America as the requisite for access to the full fruits of democracy. On its face, one could imagine that this was a political event, but one would have had to have missed the vital religious leadership and ideology behind it.

This paper looks especially at the ties between this immigrant activism and the larger public’s response to “Strangers No Longer: Together on a Journey of Hope,” a joint pastoral letter sent out in 2003 by a combination of Mexican and American Bishops, and quickly adopted by most of the National Catholic hierarchy in America. The document is extraordinary on many fronts, making clear for instance that Catholic “social teaching” in America is increasingly using the language and praxis of liberation theology, a theology drawn especially from Latin Americans in the U.S... Perhaps most important for this paper, the document also questions America’s right to “sovereign” borders, when the use of those borders is to keep the poor away from the wealth of other nations. Not only do they argue that welcoming migrants should be a religious concern for Catholics and other religious people alike, but they suggest as well that it is our duty to provide sanctuary, food, social services, jobs, and to work for the civil rights of these migrants, especially if the state deems them illegal.

Using narratives from immigrants themselves, evidence of the use of liberation theology by immigrants and church leaders, and showing the artwork/posters that signify support for this activism, I’d like to interrogate how precisely we might question the sacred/secular divide in this case. An unnuanced reading might suggest that the sovereignty of borders, and the rights of states to institute and protect them, are a state or secular issue. As these movements show, however, the Catholic Church as a global institution is defining that right as limited, and immigrants of many religions are joining the movement with a similar understanding that what had once been an undoubtedly secular domain must now be challenged by an undoubtedly sacred cosmology.

2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 268 words || 
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5. Cai, Sophy. "Constructing a “Humanist” Educational Experience: Interactive Curriculum Co-Construction and Problem-Posing Pedagogy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p989486_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In this presentation, we will talk about the philosophies of pedagogy and curriculum development we worked with in this course. First, it illustrates an “interactive curriculum co-construction” process advocated by John Dewey in The Child and the Curriculum (1902) and his other works. The curriculum was not totally student-centered or teacher-centered, but co-constructed by the instructors and the students. Especially in the discussion sessions after they arrived on campus, Sophy suggested the readings based on students’ writings and her discussions with Ga Young about the questions raised in their class discussions about students’ transnational experiences. Therefore, though the curriculum started from a pool based on the instructors’ expectations, it was constantly in the making according to the students’ writings and classroom discussions.

Second, it demonstrates pedagogically a “problem-posing education” that Paulo Freire (2000) argued for. The educational experience was constructed based on the students’ reflections about their own experiences and was critically examined through problem-posing and critical reflections. For example, in the Freirean method of “problem-posing education,” it involves four stages: thematic investigation of the “generative experiences” of the students, codification, de-codification, and re-codification (Freire, 2000). In this course, the students’ reflections in their writings served as a process of “thematic investigation;” our selection of the readings (such as a report on the “Uneven Experiences” of international students on U.S campuses by the Global Perspectives Inventory) as “codification”, classroom discussions as de-codification process, and our research (including the Community Autoethnography and the conference presentation) on the course as “re-codification” process.

References:
Dewey, J. (1902). The Child and the Curriculum. University of Chicago Press.
Freire, P. (2000). Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Bloomsbury Academic.

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