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2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 11062 words || 
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1. Lee, Micky. "Constructed Global Space, Constructed Citizenship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/NAME>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p229846_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper is interested in the question of how social actors negotiate their racial/ethnic, gender, and class identities in relation to their citizen identity in a specific spatio-temporal context. More specifically, it looks at how the process of identity negotiations takes place under a neoliberal economic ideology in an integrated global economy. By examining the WTO protest in Hong Kong and Hong Kong Disneyland, it is argued that the British colonial government-designed “Hong Kong Chinese” identity has been employed by the state even after decolonisation to justify the free market policies of this city-state. New international division of labour however probes to question naturalised social relations.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Bell, Elizabeth. "Are Social Constructions Universal?: Uncovering Heterogeneity in Social Construction of Target Populations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1348415_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on a nation-wide experimental survey, I investigate whether there is heterogeneity based on individual characteristics such as race and ideology in public adherence to the hypotheses put forth by social construction of target populations.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 9609 words || 
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3. Trujillo-Pagan, Nicole. "Hazardous Constructions of Latino Immigrants in the Construction Industry: The Case of a Post-Katrina New Orleans" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104430_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper demonstrates that dominant approaches to Mexican immigrant construction workers obscure the nature of workplace discrimination. In defining the problems of occupational risk, health and safety specialists emphasize Mexican immigrant workers’ deficiencies. In contrast, workers emphasized workplace discrimination and legal vulnerability. This paper argues that health and safety specialists’ outreach to Mexican immigrant workers not only obscure experiences of discrimination and vulnerability, but also facilitate structural inequality. These perspectives were particularly evident and “hazardous” in the case of a post-disaster New Orleans as Mexican immigrants working in cleanup and recovery work found themselves physically and symbolically injured by a broader political discourse to “Bring New Orleans Back.”

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 7656 words || 
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4. Mannon, Susan. "Our Daily Bread: Constructing Households, Constructing Labor Markets" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108088_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I analyze the extent to which the ‘private’ sphere factors into workers’ labor market choices in the developing world. My case study is a town in Costa Rica’s Central Valley, which was once a major center of coffee production and now a key investment site for various export and service industries. The life histories that I collected while living in this town reveal how household structure and family relationships affect occupational outcomes and job choices. This paper begins with a review of the different ways that researchers have conceptualized the household with regard to economic change. These conceptualizations, I argue, are limited in that they focus too much on employers, production, and female workers in isolation. To fill these gaps, I piece apart the life histories and private lives of two workers in Costa Rica’s Central Valley – a husband and wife at a later phase in their ‘productive’ life cycle. Their histories show that the process by which labor markets are constructed is intimately wrapped up in the process by which households are constructed.

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