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2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 7802 words || 
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1. Lee, Byoungkwan. and Salmon, Charles. "The Effects of Information Sources on Consumer Attitudes toward Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising: A Consumer Socialization Approach" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113273_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Pharmaceutical manufacturers are spending more than $2.5 billion annually in Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising in an attempt to educate consumers about prescription drugs. Unlike most other consumer goods, prescription drugs cannot be purchased directly by the consumer, and thus the goal of most DTC advertising is to influence consumers to talk to their healthcare providers about medications that they have seen in ads. Is this advertising effective? Who is most influenced by it, and how does reliance on mass versus interpersonal communication for health information affect attitudes and behaviors regarding DTC advertising?
Using data from a nationally representative survey of the U.S. population conducting by a professional polling organization (with a sample size of 3,000), this study uses structural equation modeling to answer the above questions and to explicate linkages among antecedents (age, gender, race, education, income, family structure), socializing agents (mass and interpersonal channels), and attitudes and behaviors regarding DTC advertising.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8833 words || 
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2. Zhang, Xiaochen. and Kim, Sora. "An Examination of Consumer-Company Identification as a Key Predictor of Consumer Responses in Corporate Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p985631_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Through an experiment, this study examined how varying degrees of consumer-company identification affected consumers’ perception of and reaction to corporate crisis and the crisis-affected company. Results suggested that compared with weak identifiers, strong identifiers’ identification level had a larger decrease in a high severity condition but not in a low severity condition. Furthermore, two-sided response messages were more effective in reducing the attribution of crisis responsibility than one-sided positive response messages for weak identifiers, while one-sided positive response messages were more effective than two-sided response messages for strong identifiers. But this message effect was only found in low but not high severity crisis. Findings of the study indicated that consumer-company identification may serve as a key variable in predicting consumer responses to crisis and that crisis severity may serve as a boundary condition determining the effectiveness of crisis response messages.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8464 words || 
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3. Lin, Trisha T. C.., Bautista, John Robert Razote., Paragas, Fernando. and Goh, Dion Ho Lian. "Examining Consumer Acceptance of Location-Based Mobile Advertising: Affective Attitude, Use Intention, and Consumer Response" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p712775_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study proposes a model to examine factors affecting mobile device users’ affective attitude towards location-based advertising (LBA) and the relationship of these factors with intention to use and response to LBAs. A nationwide web survey randomly selects 605 panelists who fit key demographics quotas of mobile phone users in Singapore. PLS results show that perceived utility, context information and trust increase respondents’ positive affective attitude, while perceived sacrifice and control cause negative effect. Perceived utility is found as the strongest predictor for affective attitude towards LBAs. When consumers’ positive affective attitude increases intention to use, they are mostly likely to purchase advertised products, followed by passing others along, and searching for product information. Implications for theories and practices are discussed.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 27 pages || Words: 13295 words || 
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4. Van Holde, Stephen. "Consuming China: Social, Political, and Environmental Consequences of China's Consumer Revolution" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253792_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: China today is undergoing a consumer revolution, a revolution which is as far reaching and radical as the political, social, and cultural revolutions that preceded it. Today the Chinese people consume unprecedented amounts of goods, services, and experiences, and dream of consuming far more. By encouraging such consumerism, the Chinese state has been able to delay political reform and divert public attention from China’s growing social and environmental problems. Yet this strategy has come at an increasing cost. While state-guided consumerism has helped to promote economic growth and protect the party’s hold on power, it has also produced unequalled environmental devastation. This paper assesses that dynamic. I begin by tracing the origins of China’s new consumerism, examining the role of party leaders and state institutions in shaping consumerist values. Next, I assess the political economy of consumerism in three key sectors: the auto industry, the housing industry, and the tourist industry. In each of those areas, increasing consumer demand is placing more and more pressure on the Chinese state, society, and environment. I conclude by arguing that such pressure threatens to destroy the delicate balance between economic growth, political control, and environmental protection in China today. If China is not able to find a way to regain control over its consumer revolution, the social, political, and environmental consequences are likely to be catastrophic.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 6488 words || 
Info
5. Kim, Junghyun. and Larose, Robert. "Interactive E-Commerce: Promoting Consumer Efficiency or Consumer Impulsivity?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112656_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous research established that online shopping activity might be caused by impulse as much as by rational thinking about the conveniences of e-commerce. Certain interactive features of e-commerce sites, such as email alerts of special offers and “clickable” product arrays, may stimulate impulsive activity by undermining consumer self-regulation, but this connection has not been empirically verified. Structural equation modeling techniques were used to model the relationship of interactive e-commerce features to online buying activity with a sample of 175 college students. Recreational shopping orientation predicted the usage of interactive shopping features thought to promote impulsive purchases, increasing deficient self-regulation, and leading to increased online buying activity. Convenience shopping orientation had a direct impact on buying activity but it did not influence buying activity through the usage of convenience shopping features. However, Internet shoppers with convenience shopping orientations also utilized impulsive features, establishing a possible mechanism through which online shopping for convenience might become a lure for impulsive buying behavior. Overall, fifty-two percent of the variance in online buying activity was explained by this model.

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