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2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 7802 words || 
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1. Lee, Byoungkwan. and Salmon, Charles. "The Effects of Information Sources on Consumer Attitudes toward Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising: A Consumer Socialization Approach" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113273_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Pharmaceutical manufacturers are spending more than $2.5 billion annually in Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising in an attempt to educate consumers about prescription drugs. Unlike most other consumer goods, prescription drugs cannot be purchased directly by the consumer, and thus the goal of most DTC advertising is to influence consumers to talk to their healthcare providers about medications that they have seen in ads. Is this advertising effective? Who is most influenced by it, and how does reliance on mass versus interpersonal communication for health information affect attitudes and behaviors regarding DTC advertising?
Using data from a nationally representative survey of the U.S. population conducting by a professional polling organization (with a sample size of 3,000), this study uses structural equation modeling to answer the above questions and to explicate linkages among antecedents (age, gender, race, education, income, family structure), socializing agents (mass and interpersonal channels), and attitudes and behaviors regarding DTC advertising.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Thorson, Allison. and Horstman, Haley. "Family Communication Patterns and Emerging Adult Consumer Outcomes: Revisiting the Consumer Socialization Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/X-OCTET-STREAM>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107030_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Guided by theorizing on family communication patterns (FCP) and Moschis’ (1985) consumer socialization model, this study investigated the way family communication environments (i.e., conversation and conformity orientations) contributed to emerging adults’ (n = 343) consumer skills, preferences, and attitudes. A mediated moderation regression model revealed that FCP were significant predictors of parents’ influence over their emerging adult children’s consumer skills, preferences, and attitudes. Results also indicated that parents who exhibited higher conversation and conformity orientations had more influence on their emerging adult children’s consumer behaviors than did those who exhibited lower conversation and conformity orientations. Further, the influence of parental communication on emerging adult consumer skills was mediated by emerging adults’ consumer preferences and attitudes. These findings – derived through the use of an updated and more analytically robust application of FCP than used in previous consumer socialization research - provide a more complete understanding of parents’ influence on their emerging adults’ consumer reasoning.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8833 words || 
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3. Zhang, Xiaochen. and Kim, Sora. "An Examination of Consumer-Company Identification as a Key Predictor of Consumer Responses in Corporate Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p985631_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Through an experiment, this study examined how varying degrees of consumer-company identification affected consumers’ perception of and reaction to corporate crisis and the crisis-affected company. Results suggested that compared with weak identifiers, strong identifiers’ identification level had a larger decrease in a high severity condition but not in a low severity condition. Furthermore, two-sided response messages were more effective in reducing the attribution of crisis responsibility than one-sided positive response messages for weak identifiers, while one-sided positive response messages were more effective than two-sided response messages for strong identifiers. But this message effect was only found in low but not high severity crisis. Findings of the study indicated that consumer-company identification may serve as a key variable in predicting consumer responses to crisis and that crisis severity may serve as a boundary condition determining the effectiveness of crisis response messages.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8464 words || 
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4. Lin, Trisha T. C.., Bautista, John Robert Razote., Paragas, Fernando. and Goh, Dion Ho Lian. "Examining Consumer Acceptance of Location-Based Mobile Advertising: Affective Attitude, Use Intention, and Consumer Response" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p712775_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study proposes a model to examine factors affecting mobile device users’ affective attitude towards location-based advertising (LBA) and the relationship of these factors with intention to use and response to LBAs. A nationwide web survey randomly selects 605 panelists who fit key demographics quotas of mobile phone users in Singapore. PLS results show that perceived utility, context information and trust increase respondents’ positive affective attitude, while perceived sacrifice and control cause negative effect. Perceived utility is found as the strongest predictor for affective attitude towards LBAs. When consumers’ positive affective attitude increases intention to use, they are mostly likely to purchase advertised products, followed by passing others along, and searching for product information. Implications for theories and practices are discussed.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10224 words || 
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5. Tuttle, Scott. and Kim, ChangHwan. "Consumer Behavior in Ethnic Enclaves: Does Co-ethnic Density Reduce Consumer Spending?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379365_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Though sociological research on immigrant enclaves and co-ethnic spatial homogeneity is rife with analyses on how associated conditions affect entrepreneurship, research on these phenomena from the consumer’s perspective is lacking. Because consumers make up a larger proportion of the population inhabiting areas often described as enclaves, and are responsible for the success or failure of local enclave businesses as well as the flow of local revenue, an analysis of enclave consumers is warranted. This paper purports to bridge the gap between research on immigrant entrepreneurs, which often relies heavily on variations of the enclave thesis and theories of concentrated wealth and poverty, with research on consumers, particularly with regards to established theories on consumer ethnocentrism and consumer acculturation. Using the 1995-2015 Current Population Survey, we test the effect of co-ethnic immigrant density on degrees of consumer spending per week on food. Focusing specifically on Mexican immigrants and East Asian immigrants, who each make up a significant portion of the foreign-born population, our results indicate that an increase in co-ethnic density significantly corresponded to a decrease in weekly spending for Mexicans, but an increase in spending for East Asians. The implications of these findings are discussed.

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