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2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 7802 words || 
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1. Lee, Byoungkwan. and Salmon, Charles. "The Effects of Information Sources on Consumer Attitudes toward Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising: A Consumer Socialization Approach" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113273_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Pharmaceutical manufacturers are spending more than $2.5 billion annually in Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising in an attempt to educate consumers about prescription drugs. Unlike most other consumer goods, prescription drugs cannot be purchased directly by the consumer, and thus the goal of most DTC advertising is to influence consumers to talk to their healthcare providers about medications that they have seen in ads. Is this advertising effective? Who is most influenced by it, and how does reliance on mass versus interpersonal communication for health information affect attitudes and behaviors regarding DTC advertising?
Using data from a nationally representative survey of the U.S. population conducting by a professional polling organization (with a sample size of 3,000), this study uses structural equation modeling to answer the above questions and to explicate linkages among antecedents (age, gender, race, education, income, family structure), socializing agents (mass and interpersonal channels), and attitudes and behaviors regarding DTC advertising.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 387 words || 
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2. Cairns, Kate. and Johnston, Josee. "All Consuming: Using Consumer Culture to Teach Sociological Thinking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006068_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A key challenge faced by instructors of “intro sociology” courses is the goal of fostering students’ sociological imaginations. Making connections between the “personal” world of individuals’ lives, and the “public” world of institutional forces like states, markets, and bureaucracy is always a challenge – particularly in a culture that places a strong emphasis on the individual. In this presentation, we suggest that consumer culture provides a rich lens through which to introduce students to sociological thinking. Drawing inspiration from Daniel Miller’s creative explorations of material culture – which he labels studies of “stuff” – we map out a book project that uses the stuff of consumer culture (e.g., cars, coffee, wedding parties) to teach key sociological themes. This work is united by one core idea – that our interaction with “stuff” is not a solitary endeavor, but is shaped by myriad social connections, both material and cultural. In this roundtable presentation, we briefly outline the project, and discuss the “thinking frames” deployed within each chapter, centering on core analytic tensions within sociological thinking: 1) material/culture; 2) structure/agency; and 3) macro/micro. Then, we feature one exemplary chapter, in order to illustrate how the stuff of consumer culture can be used to foster sociological thinking. With a thematic focus on food, this chapter introduces core sociological concepts in the study of culture, including norms, values, and ethnocentrism. The roundtable provides an exciting opportunity to share these ideas with colleagues, and to elicit insights derived from their own undergraduate teaching experiences.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 27 pages || Words: 13295 words || 
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3. Van Holde, Stephen. "Consuming China: Social, Political, and Environmental Consequences of China's Consumer Revolution" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253792_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: China today is undergoing a consumer revolution, a revolution which is as far reaching and radical as the political, social, and cultural revolutions that preceded it. Today the Chinese people consume unprecedented amounts of goods, services, and experiences, and dream of consuming far more. By encouraging such consumerism, the Chinese state has been able to delay political reform and divert public attention from China’s growing social and environmental problems. Yet this strategy has come at an increasing cost. While state-guided consumerism has helped to promote economic growth and protect the party’s hold on power, it has also produced unequalled environmental devastation. This paper assesses that dynamic. I begin by tracing the origins of China’s new consumerism, examining the role of party leaders and state institutions in shaping consumerist values. Next, I assess the political economy of consumerism in three key sectors: the auto industry, the housing industry, and the tourist industry. In each of those areas, increasing consumer demand is placing more and more pressure on the Chinese state, society, and environment. I conclude by arguing that such pressure threatens to destroy the delicate balance between economic growth, political control, and environmental protection in China today. If China is not able to find a way to regain control over its consumer revolution, the social, political, and environmental consequences are likely to be catastrophic.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Thorson, Allison. and Horstman, Haley. "Family Communication Patterns and Emerging Adult Consumer Outcomes: Revisiting the Consumer Socialization Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/X-OCTET-STREAM>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107030_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Guided by theorizing on family communication patterns (FCP) and Moschis’ (1985) consumer socialization model, this study investigated the way family communication environments (i.e., conversation and conformity orientations) contributed to emerging adults’ (n = 343) consumer skills, preferences, and attitudes. A mediated moderation regression model revealed that FCP were significant predictors of parents’ influence over their emerging adult children’s consumer skills, preferences, and attitudes. Results also indicated that parents who exhibited higher conversation and conformity orientations had more influence on their emerging adult children’s consumer behaviors than did those who exhibited lower conversation and conformity orientations. Further, the influence of parental communication on emerging adult consumer skills was mediated by emerging adults’ consumer preferences and attitudes. These findings – derived through the use of an updated and more analytically robust application of FCP than used in previous consumer socialization research - provide a more complete understanding of parents’ influence on their emerging adults’ consumer reasoning.

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