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2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 13309 words || 
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1. Sprain, Leah. "Voices of Organic Consumption: An Ethnographic and Rhetorical Exploration of Organic Consumption as Political Consumption" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 18, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p92374_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Michelle Micheletti (2003) argues organic consumption qualifies as political consumption in the form of a “positive political consumerist endeavor” that uses certified organic labels to politicize products (p. 98). Rather than attribute a single, political voice to organic consumption defined by a certification scheme, I aim to understand heuristically how individuals and groups talk about and promote organic consumption. Ethnographic discourse analysis of two Internet discussion groups reveals that one group accepts organic consumption as a way to "do something," where organic consumption is a means of "speaking" about "values" and "politics." The other group rejects organic consumption as an accepted means of communication, instead describing it as an alternative to public, political solutions to concerns about genetically modified foods. The rhetorical analysis argues that organic promotion materials constitute two types of organic consumers: tasteful consumers and political actors. Together the ethnographic discourse analysis and rhetorical criticism qualify Micheletti's treatment of organic consumption and suggest alternative voices of organic consumption.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9567 words || 
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2. Mundey, Peter. "The Informal Rules of Consumption: Exploring the Unofficial Guidelines of American Consumption" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p565100_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How materialistic are Americans and how do they think about consumption? To what extent do consumer desires, attitudes, and behaviors revolve around buying “bigger and better” products and experiences, or perhaps living simply? Are there any limits to consumption? What material things or experiences do people long for? What is the “good life” when it comes to buying, owning, and spending? This paper aims to address these questions, seeking to measure and better understand the current cultural approach to American consumerism, the nature of consumer financial decision-making, and the values that drive consumption. I begin by analyzing some descriptive statistics about materialistic values and consumer practices from the Science of Generosity’s nationally representative survey data, and then contextualize these findings with in-depth interview data from this study. Three informal rules of consumption emerging out of the interviews are described: live within your means, avoid conspicuous consumption, and don’t be wasteful. I argue these “rules” are less a critique of consumerism, or a check on the excesses of materialism, than a legitimation of the consumptive status quo.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. ZHANG, KE. "Entertainment Consumption of Sport Celebrity: Comparing Influences of Different Source Credibility Characters on Consumption Intention" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1229693_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research compares the different influences of source credibility attractiveness and expertise of the sport celebrity endorser on consumers’ intention in purchasing the endorsed brand, introducing a model that integrates impacts of attractiveness related variables and expertise related variables as well as the moderator variable ideal congruity on audiences’ parasocial interaction with the sport celebrity. Results of the research reject the assumption that consumers tend to pay more attention on the attractiveness rather than the expertise of the sport celebrity in purchasing the endorsed brand, but validate the salience of the model. Audiences, who hold parasocial interaction with the sport celebrity, are driven by both homophily with the celebrity and reverence to the celebrity as well as ideal congruity between their ideal self-image and image of the celebrity. This model complements the existing literature on sport celebrity endorsement by positing attractiveness and homophily as a salient dimension of sport endorser effects.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6522 words || 
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4. Andrews, Christopher. "Consumption as ‘Contested Terrain’: Bringing Consumption Back Into the Marxian Discourse" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109370_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing upon the labor process perspective, this paper extends Edwards’ (1979) thesis of ‘control’, exploring how direct, bureaucratic, and technical forms of control may be used to control consumers and social patterns of consumption. Outlining the role of consumption within Marx’s theory of capitalism, the author presents control as the methods used by capitalists to obtain desired consumer behavior. Significant discussion is given to addressing each type of control, as well as providing examples of such forms in contemporary American society. Concluding remarks suggest that other concepts associated with the labor process – including deskilling and worker consent – may provide additional insight in studies of consumption and consumer behavior.

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