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2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5149 words || 
Info
1. Mosher, Jenny. "Bodies in Contempt: A Qualitative Study of ADA Employment Cases" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726247_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper focuses on the qualitative findings of a larger mixed methods study of disability discrimiantion in the workplace. A sample of 200 cases which document disability discrimination lawsuits was drawn from the Westlaw legal database. Each case was coded for gender, job, disability and discrimination type and analyzed using binary and multinomial logistic models. Of those 200 cases, 34 were selected for in depth qualitative analysis. In this paper I will examine the themes found in the qualitative analysis of those 34 court cases. The narratives show patterns of employers terminating employees with disabilities in ways that may make it seem that the disability is not to blame. The first method is through restructuring, in which the job held by someone with a disability has been eliminated in company restructuring. The second process occurs when an employee is disqualified due their disability. Although this also happens across job categories, it has a unique function in physically demanding, working-class jobs where the employer is able to use the language of the ADA against the employee. The data also show that many of the claims of being denied an accommodation were regarding accommodations in scheduling which were primarily brought by people with pain disabilities and chronic illness. Accommodations which seem to challenge the ‘traditional’ work schedule tend to be met with much skepticism by employers particularly when requested by someone with a nonvisible disability. Finally, disability harassment was more prevalent in working class jobs than the other job types.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 6700 words || 
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2. Ejaz, Khadija., Kim, Joon., Bhalla, Nandini. and Weatherred, Jane. "In Contempt of Court?: Unintended Consequences of Watching Courtroom Shows" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1281609_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Courtroom shows like Judge Judy frequently top the ratings charts in the United States. This
study examines such shows through media system dependency (MSD). Responses from a sample
of 401 respondents were gathered using a self-administered online survey. Analysis revealed that
watching courtroom shows made viewers dependent on television to understand the world. At
the same time, such dependence was related to poor knowledge of the small claims court system.
The implications of this finding are discussed in light of other findings that indicated that
watching such shows made viewers more likely to participate in both real and television courts.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4781 words || 
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3. Husting, Ginna. "Contempt as Discursive Violence: A Feminist Sociological Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1009887_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores key themes for a twinned feminist theorization and sociological investigation of contempt, integrating sociology with political theory (Hannah Arendt in particular) and ethical concerns. It takes up two problems. The first is one of distinction and definition: defining and measuring contempt are difficult tasks and much work in psychology and ethics has oversimplified or distorted contempt in the effort. Definitional work segues into the second problem with contempt: its function as a tool for creating, maintaining, and deepening inequality. Borrowing a style of careful analysis from feminist political theory, and merging it with Schwalbe's work on the generic processes of inequality, I aim to show the means by which contempt functions. I highlight what Sara Ahmed (partly following Hochschild) calls the stickiness and the virality of contempt: it proliferates across certain kinds of bodies and selves, targeting those who are already unequal. I end by considering contempt as a form of emotional governmentality, and by linking these problems to Hannah Arendt's vision of democratic political action. Feminists and sociologists who theorize and pursue social justice should regard contempt as a master's tool – a tool of the oppressor may be a problematic means of fighting oppression. I argue that contempt is a form of discursive violence that has a heavy recoil – it sows the seeds for the proliferation of more contempt, and it can decrease possibilities for political action and social change.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 227 words || 
Info
4. Elad-Strenger, Julia., Halperin, Eran., Kessler, Thomas., Reifen Tagar, Michal., Brahms, Kea., Hasson, Yossi., Cohrs, Christopher., Shuman, Eric. and Shulman, Deborah. "When groups become "invisible": The toxic role of group-based contempt in intergroup relations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1252786_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Intergroup conflicts, which often have devastating effects on the individuals and collectives involved, are fueled by powerful socio-psychological processes. Prominent among them are group-based emotions, which play a critical role in shaping and maintaining intergroup conflict. Despite the tremendous developments in the psychological study of discrete group-based emotions and their unique effects on intergroup relations and conflicts, most studies in this domain focus on the emotions that lead to violent forms of aggression, but less so on more "passive" forms of aggression, which may include ignoring and denying the out-group's perspectives and contributions, avoiding mutual cooperation and communication, and rejecting any prospect of social integration. These "passive" forms of aggression are undoubtedly toxic as they are costly and destructive for intergroup relations, and may function as significant driving forces of intergroup tensions and conflicts.
The present project identifies group-based contempt as a central emotional "active ingredient" in such toxic intergroup behaviors. Across four studies, conducted in Israel, Germany and the United States and in different intergroup contexts, we demonstrate that group-based contempt is associated with unique cognitive appraisals and action tendencies that differentiate it from other group-based emotions, primarily group-based hatred, anger and disgust. More specifically, we demonstrate that group-based contempt uniquely predicts support for "passive" forms of intergroup aggression that severely disrupt intergroup discourse, communication, and cooperation. Ramifications for the perpetuation of intergroup conflict will be discussed.

2010 - ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 282 words || 
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5. Skitka, Linda., Morgan, G. Scott. and Wisneski, Daniel. "Shades of Contempt: Exploring the Cross-Cultural Generalizability and Scope of Morally Motivated Intolerance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting, Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco, California, USA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420108_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: Moral foundations theory suggests that the current political divisions in the United States (and presumably elsewhere) can be understood by liberals’ and conservatives’ commitments to different moral foundations (Graham, Haidt, & Nosek, 2009). Among other things, this theory predicts that conservatives’ moral worldviews are based more on a purity/religious foundation than are liberals’. This theory suggests that one should therefore consistently find that political orientation moderates the degree to which people’s moral convictions about political issues are tied to their religious convictions. To test this idea, we asked a national sample of adults the degree to which a number of issues reflected their moral and, separately, their religious convictions. Political orientation moderated the associations between moral and religious convictions for 6 of 12 issues (abortion, the housing crisis, the environment, homeland security, same sex marriage, and health care). In each of these cases, participants whose attitudes were strongly based on religious convictions—regardless of whether they were liberal or conservative—were equally likely to say these attitudes also reflected strong moral convictions. Ideological differences emerged only among those whose attitudes reflected weak religious convictions: in each of these cases, liberals’ attitudes were consistently higher than conservatives’ in moral conviction. Political orientation did not moderate the association between moral and religious convictions for the remaining six attitude domains (attitudes about energy, immigration, tax cuts, Iran, unemployment, or gasoline prices); in each of these domains, the religious foundations of these attitudes were equally strong for both liberals and conservatives. In summary, liberals’ and conservatives’ moral sensibilities were equally likely to reflect strong religious convictions. Where liberals and conservatives differed is in the degree to which they had strong moral convictions in the absence of religious convictions.

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