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2010 - North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Pages: unavailable || Words: 504 words || 
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1. Cardetti, Fabiana., Truxaw, Mary. and Bushey, Cynthia. "Influences of Mathematics Content Courses on Elementary Preservice Teachers’ Content Knowledge and Pedagogical Content Knowledge" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, Oct 28, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p428111_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is a general consensus that mathematical content knowledge (M-CK) is crucial for enabling elementary school teachers to effectively teach mathematics. However, it has been suggested that M-CK is not sufficient for elementary school teachers – it must be accompanied by mathematics pedagogical content knowledge (M-PCK). In order to better identify coursework that may promote M-CK and M-PCK, this study investigates confidence of M-CK and M-PCK of elementary preservice teachers (PSTs) who have participated in math content coursework designed specifically for elementary teachers. Findings suggest that participation in these courses positively influences PSTs’ M-CK and M-PCK.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 48 pages || Words: 9976 words || 
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2. Heo, Nokon. and Sundar, S. Shyam. "The Role of Screen Size in Inferring the Effects of Content Type on Attention, Arousal, Memory, and Content Evaluation: A Search for Content-Specific Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113414_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined the role of screen size in making inferences about the effects of television content on viewers’ attention, arousal, memory, and content evaluation. Both main and combined effects of two levels of screen size and three levels of content type on the four criterion variables were investigated via a 2x3 mixed factorial-experiment. A total of seventy-five participants were randomly assigned to one of the two screen size conditions (big or small). Those in each condition watched six 2 to 3-minute-long television segments representing three different content types (news, advertising, and entertainment). During the viewing, heart rate and skin conductance (SC) were measured as indicators of attention and arousal respectively. Heart rate data were later converted into beats per minutes (BPM). Skin conductance data were converted into skin conductance response (SCR) and skin conductance level (SCL). After watching, participants completed a questionnaire containing measures of psychological responses to the segments.
The results showed that, with few exceptions, content on the large screen resulted in better memory and was more attention-getting and arousing, as indicated by an cardiac deceleration and an increased SC responses. However, the predicted effect of screen size on participants’ subjective content evaluation did not materialize. Of most importance, viewers’ cardiac and SC responses were most prominent when entertainment content appeared on the big screen, which demonstrated content-specific effects for large screens.

2007 - International Communication Association Words: 198 words || 
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3. Gantz, Walter. and Schwartz, Nancy. "Food Advertising Seen by Children: Incorporating Viewing Patterns in Content Analyses of Nonprogramming Content" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172143_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Unlike other content analyses of advertising directed to children, this study examines how much and what types of advertising are likely to be seen by children. The sample contains 1,638 hours of content aired on a total of 13 broadcast and cable networks viewed most often by children 2-17 years old. Non-programming content was weighted by the viewing patterns of 2-7, 8-12, and 13-17 year olds. A total of 56,236 non-programming elements were coded, of which 40,152 were ads. Extensive analyses, including primary persuasive appeals and the use of any health appeals, were run on the 8,854 food ads. Children encounter roughly 2.5 minutes of food ads for every hour of television they watch. Because they watch more television, children 8-12 are likely to see more food ads than children 2-7 or those 13-17. Over a single year, 8-12 year olds are likely to see over 7,500 food ads that, if run back to back, would cover over 50 hours. Most of the ads all children see are for foods that nutritionists, watchdog groups, and relevant government organizations (e.g., the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services) argue should be consumed in moderation and/or in small portions.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 6872 words || 
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4. Pan, Ji. and Fu, Wayne. "Love Internet, Love Its Content: Predicting Media and Content Affinity With Social and Informational Gratifications" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p554115_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines how informational and social gratifications predict user affinity for the Internet and for online contents. Regression analyses of survey data show that people feel affinity for the Internet and for online contents mainly for its social functions. The passive social gratification of permanent access to contacts and the active seek of connections exert similar impacts on affinity for the Internet and for online contents. Information gratification, however, influences neither Internet affinity nor content affinity after the influence of social gratifications is controlled. Internet affinity is closely correlated with content affinity, though the two are not the same. Implications for Internet use and website promotion are discussed.

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 199 words || 
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5. Yamamura, Takayoshi. "The Rediscovery and Invention of Traditional Culture through Anime Contents: Historical Characteristics of Contents Tourism in Japanese Popular Entertainment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p951734_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In Japan, anime contents tourism (seichi junrei), when fans visit places related to their favorite anime, has been popular since 2007. As a result, collaboration between traditional culture and anime contents has increased, including the incorporation of anime contents into traditional local festivals or even the creation of new festivals.

In this study, the historical background to and development of this phenomenon are examined. A number of local festivals that have incorporated anime contents are investigated; furthermore, the process by which anime contents have been assimilated into local festivals and cultures is explained.

The strong affinity between traditional culture and anime contents will be illustrated from three perspectives. First, there is the rediscovery of effective interaction between local traditional culture, anime as media, and anime contents as ‘emotive access’; second is the shared ritualistic and liminal similarities in traditional festival sites and sacred anime sites, as well as an analysis of the way people connect to the sites; and third is the links between traditional culture and its transformation based on the absorption of new elements and anime culture (e.g. the characteristics that popular entertainment/pop culture have in common with traditional Japanese contents, as distinctively seen in waka and kabuki).

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