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2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Johnson, Mary. "Outsourcing Contract Specialist Support for the Federal Government - new trends and practices for the use of contracted personnel to support government contracts management." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361127_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The use of outsourcing in governmental arenas has recently gained momentum. Public policy such as A-76 has been on the books since 1955. Recent legislation, such as the Federal Inventories and Reform Act (FAIR Act) in mid-1990's and the President's Management Agenda on competitive sourcing have resulted in the use of outsourcing. Only recently has the federal government utilized contractor personnel to help administer government contracts. By learning from state and local governments, the federal government determined that certain areas of the contract administration process may be accomplished by contractor personnel. The theory by which the federal government decided to pursue this practice is "organizational field". Another reason for the utilization of contractor personnel for government contracts administration is the shortage of capacity of qualified governmental personnel on staff. Contractor in contracts office will be explained in terms of delineation of what is "inherently governmental" and what is not. The sensitive area of "organizational conflict of interest" will be discussed in regards to the contracted personnel handling other contractor's proprietary information.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 149 words || 
Info
2. Ang, Yuen Yuen. "“Bureau-Contracting in China: Fusing Public Bureaucracy and Private Contracting_x000d_(Or, How Chinese Bureaucracies are Organized as Markets and Hierarchies)”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362752_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This chapter introduces the puzzling anomaly of Chinese bureaucratic structure, labeled here as bureau-contracting. This hybrid system fuses elements of public bureaucracy (i.e. hierarchical personnel appointment) and private contracting (i.e. market-based financing). The party-state in reform-era China is run by a tiny formal civil service and a sprawling periphery of extrabureaucracies who administer, organize public services, and run businesses. Agents of power are party appointed but partially self-financed with state-awarded privileges, empowering and permitting them to obtain private income from public office. By unpacking the black box of budgetary rules and processes, I show that Chinese public bureaucracies, in practice, own the income they raise. They may generate surpluses or suffer deficits. Drawing on new descriptive statistics and over 165 interviews across localities and governmental sectors, the author systematically identifies the defining features of bureau-contracting and their implications for rethinking the nature of state and market in transitional economies.

2009 - The Law and Society Association Words: 190 words || 
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3. Spence, Glenys. "Caliban’s Burden--Applicability of the United Nations Contract on the International of Goods (CISG) to the Commonwealth Caribbean: A Step Towards Uniformity, Synthesis, or Injustice in International Contracts?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p303470_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: ABSTRACT
The interpretation of international legal instruments becomes entrenched in a dialectical tug-of-war once these instruments enter the space in which they are designed to operate. International treaties and agreements spring from a desire to unify the world – to establish a sort of universal “common sense.” This goal is based on the assumption that the global economy operates within a particular social formation, constructed from specific ideological discourses. This article examines the legal space in which the United Nations Convention on the Sale of Goods (CISG) can thrive in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and the broader Commonwealth Caribbean. This article takes a socio-legal approach exploring the multifaceted legal, social and political cultures that exist in the region in order to arrive not at ways to promote uniformity but to prescribe a synthesis of a legal tradition that is often bogged down in a simmering vat of indigenous, Afro-Caribbean, colonial, and post-colonial ideologies. The final question this paper seeks to answer is whether international Treaties like the CISG can operate within the confines of Caribbean legal tradition in a practical way and, perhaps, contribute to legal reform in the region.

2004 - The Law and Society Association Words: 266 words || 
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4. Oberman, Michelle. "Secrets, Lies, and Contracts: An Exploration of the Duty to Disclose in Contract Formation Between Intimates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, May 27, 2004 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p117163_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the course of the 20th century, the common law undertook a dramatic shift away from the doctrine of caveat emptor, imposing duties of good faith and fair dealing in the performance and negotiation of contracts. This shift signaled a change in social mores, with the result that, in most contexts, the law now limits one’s right to take advantage of another’s ignorance or mistaken beliefs. Ironically, contemporary courts evaluating contracts between intimates have not uniformly applied these same reforms. Indeed, in spite of the profound risks of manipulation and exploitation inherent in this setting, the arena of contracts between intimates remains one of the last bastions of the caveat emptor approach to contract formation.
This paper uses the example of paternity-related settlements to explore the extent to which nondisclosure, or even affirmative misrepresentation, may be permissible in contract formation between intimates. After noting the risks of exploitation and manipulation particular to this bargaining context, I describe the traditional common law view of paternity-related settlements, in which the doctrine of caveat emptor plays a central role. Next, I analyze the extent to which, under traditional common law rules of consideration and public policy, these contracts have been held enforceable. This section uses the recent case involving professional basketball player Michael Jordan and an aspiring entertainer, Karla Knafel, to illustrate the problems inherent in the traditional common law approach to these contracts. Finally, I explore the policy consequences, both positive and negative, of requiring more truth-telling and disclosure in the context of paternity-related settlements in particular, and more generally, in the full range of bargains between intimates.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 321 words || 
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5. Brown, Geneva. "Brothers Always Die First: The Failure of the Social Contract and Reinforcement of the Racial Contract that Prohibits the Rehabilitation and Reintegration of Black Male Offenders into a Free Society" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 29, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p230469_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Jean Jacques Rousseau devised the social contract to balance the individual freedoms of person against the collective will of others: each person puts all his/her power under the supreme direction of the general will, and in the corporate capacity, each member is received as an individual part of the whole. Charles Mills uses Rousseau as the basis of reconfiguring the social contract into a racial contract that has contrarian claims. Mills theorizes that the racial contract is a set of “meta-agreements” between whites to categorize non-whites as inferior morally and legally in status compared to whites. The “contract” gives whites the right to exploit nonwhites and deny them the privileges and opportunities whites enjoy. I examine Rousseau and Mills and theorize a third contract, the criminal-legal contract. The criminal-legal contract surmises that once a person has violated the laws of the free state that that person must be sanctioned. However, once the sanction is established and completed, that person must be allowed to become a full member of the free state again. The racial nature of the criminal justice system disallows sanctioned individuals from ever becoming members of the free state. Regressive laws are enacted to banish individuals from ever participating in the free state, once their sanction is complete. Felons are not allowed to vote; they must inform employers of their legal status; and they may be denied financial aid amongst other reactionary responses. Columbia, Princeton and Harvard have authored studies that show how poorly educated young black men are becoming evermore disconnected from mainstream society. The incarceration rates of young black men have climbed against the climate of decreasing crime overall. If the free society does not allow the inclusion of young black men with criminal records, the criminal-legal contract surmises that this is the absolute failure of the social contract and the reinforcement of Mill’s racial contract.

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