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2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 40 pages || Words: 11169 words || 
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1. Cooper, Scott. "Why Doesn't Regional Monetary Cooperation Follow Trade Cooperation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179811_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Conventional theories in political economy argue that monetary cooperation is more likely in regions that are economically interdependent. In practice, however, regional trade cooperation generally does not lead to monetary cooperation. I argue that this disparity results from different political economy logics in the two issue areas. Unlike in trade cooperation, the domestic actor forced to sacrifice the most in a regional monetary agreement is the government itself, which loses a significant tool for domestic economic adjustment as well as an important political symbol. Thus, monetary cooperation is only likely if there are direct benefits to the government to compensate for its lost monetary control. Benefits to the aggregate economy or to particular economic sectors only benefit the government indirectly, and are therefore usually insufficient compensation. I explore this argument with two case studies: Central America and West Africa. Central America has had the highest level of trade cooperation in the developing world, but never successfully implemented monetary cooperation. West Africa, by contrast, developed a strong regional currency despite its very low intra-regional trade. West Africa did have, however, experience with prior regional monetary institutions that lowered the costs to the government of new cooperation.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Anderson, Kathryn. "Cultivating Cooperation: Can Joining an Ideological Agricultural Co-op Make you More Cooperative?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1122641_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the influence of market structure on cultural identities. In it, I investigate the cultural values of organic dairy farmers and examine the influence on these values of being a member of a mission-driven cooperative enterprise compared with supplying to an investor-owned publicly traded enterprise.

2017 - 41st Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference Words: 141 words || 
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3. Mwase, Daka. "Cooperatives and Environmentally-Friendly Farming Methods: The Case of Twikatane Cooperative in Samfya-Zambia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 41st Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference, Hilton Houston Post Oak, Houston, TX, Mar 08, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1263391_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The research focuses on the role of small scale farmer’s cooperative practicing environmental friendly farming method called “Gampani’’ conservation farming. The Gampani conservation farming system is not just environmental friendly, but also has the ability to help small scale farmers obtain the highest possible yields within a limited area. This case study is conducted with a cooperative group called “Twikatane’’ (meaning lets bond and work together). The location of the research is Lubwe village of Samfya district in northern parts of Zambia. Some of the research findings indicate that the Gampani system of cultivation uses less land, labor and water and yet yields higher produce as opposed to traditional “Chitemene” system of cultivation. It also establishes that this farming method is not only sustainable but is also improving livelihoods of communities especially with the onset of climate change in Southern Africa.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 184 words || 
Info
4. Fujiwara, Ikuro. "Repeating Nuclear Threat in East Asia: New Ratio between Cooperative and Non-Cooperative Payoffs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178928_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Among the pending issues in East Asia such as Taiwan Strait and China?s military build-up, the issue of nuclear weapons of North Korea is the third factor to unstable the region, including the United States (Brookes 2005). At the end of the fourth round of six-party talk on September 19, 2005, North Korea made promise to the other parties that it would abandon nuclear weapons and its development program. However, the joint statement did not adopt any date for North Korea to abolish existing nuclear weapons. It is a game for North Korea to bargain the threat of nuclear weapons with energy, food, and economic aid from other countries. In the past, North Korea declared twice its intention of withdrawal from NPT, Non-proliferation Treaty, and it successfully gained the concession from other countries such as KEDO and international aid. To negotiate successfully with North Korea, it is impeccable to consider how North Korea plays game and how beneficial multi-party talks would be. In this paper with application software, I demonstrate the ratio between cooperative and non-cooperative games is not so large as people expect.

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