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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 496 words || 
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1. Beck, Ashley., Power, Thomas., olivera, yadira., Bonilla-Pachecl, Verónica., Hill, Rachael., Weinmann, Kayla., Fisher, Jennifer., O'Connor, Teresia. and Hughes, Sheryl. "Parental Scaffolding of their Preschool Children’s Coping with a Stressful Situation: Relations with Child Coping" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958763_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Stress and coping play a major role in the development of psychopathology. Despite their importance, our understanding of the factors that influence the development of coping skills in early childhood is limited. This is particularly true of research on the parent’s role. Although we know that parental warmth, consistency, and authoritative discipline are positively associated with the development of effective coping styles, we have limited information on the specific mechanisms through which parents influence children’s coping.
For the current abstract, data was collected on 187 families recruited from Head Start centers; families consisted of Latino children ages 2-5 and their mothers. Children were asked to complete a challenging and stressful task, Milton Bradley’s Operation game, with the assistance of their mothers. Children were instructed to remove the pieces without touching the sides. If the child accidentally let the piece touch the side of the opening, a loud buzzer sounded. Mothers were told that they could help their child in any way that they wanted, but that they were not allowed to do the tasks for the child. Information was also collected on their children’s ability to delay their gratification, using Mischel’s well-known bell task, where children could accept a small food reward or wait for a larger reward. Children who are better able to delay gratification in the preschool years are found to be more verbally fluent, able to better cope with stress, less distractible, more intelligent, and more self-assured than their peers later in life (Mischel et al., 1989; Shoda et al., 1990). They are also found to have greater positive adjustment (Eigsti et al., 2006).
A detailed event coding system was developed to describe maternal scaffolding during the Operation game and child coping strategies during the delay of gratification task. Based upon their correlations with successful wait time, both “effective” and “ineffective” child delay strategies were coded. Results showed numerous correlations between maternal scaffolding in one situation and child coping in the other. Specifically, mothers who praised their children’s strategies during the Operation game had children who used more effective child strategies in the delay of gratification task including shutting out stimuli (e.g., covering eyes), preventing movement (e.g., putting hands under table), and distraction with an object other than the reward (e.g., inspects object). Mothers who criticized their children’s strategies during the Operation game had children who used the ineffective delay strategy of distraction with reward (e.g., manipulates reward), and mothers who downplayed the importance of success on the Operation task had children who were less likely to play a game with the reward in the delay of gratification task (an effective strategy that often involves cognitive transformation of the reward stimulus). Finally, highly restrictive or directive mothers had children who were less likely to use the effective strategy of distraction with an object other than the reward. Implications of these findings for understanding maternal socialization of children’s coping will be discussed.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 11786 words || 
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2. McManus, Tara. and Lucas, Alysa. "Factors Influencing Friends’ Coping With Sexual Stressors and Their Impact on Relational and Coping Satisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p640750_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Emerging adults are the most at risk group of Americans for STIs and unwanted pregnancies. Because they frequently discuss sex-related issues and concerns, understanding the assistance friends provide each other may provide insight into how they may encourage or deter healthy sexual behaviors. Stressor severity, interactional goals, and perceptions of power were tested as factors prompting social support and communal coping. The mediating effects of communicative coping assistance on relational satisfaction and coping satisfaction were also examined. Survey results indicated all three factors were related to informational, nurturant, tangible, and esteem support and problem-solving communal coping, and these forms of coping assistance mediated the association of legitimate, expert, and referent power with relational satisfaction. Results suggest the Model of Communal Coping (Lyons & Meade, 1995; Lyons et al., 1998) could be extended into an explanatory coping theory and offer insight into how friends’ may influence one another’s sexual behaviors.

2016 - SRCD Special Topic Meeting: Babies, Boys and Men of Color Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Bart-Plange, Emma-Lorraine., Pierre, Cynthia. and Gaylord-Harden, Noni. "Validation of the Youth Africultural Coping System Inventory: Culturally-relevant coping strategies of African American males" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Special Topic Meeting: Babies, Boys and Men of Color, Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel & Marina, Tampa, FL, Oct 06, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1156323_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: African-American youth from economically-disadvantaged, urban families and communities are disproportionately exposed to stressful life conditions, placing them at increased risk for mental health problems (Gonzales & Kim, 1997; Grant et al., 2000). Improving adaptation to stress has been identified as one of the most promising approaches to preventing the development of problems during adolescence (Sandler, Wolchik, MacKinnon, Ayers, & Roosa, 1997). A subset of a broader domain of the ways children and adolescents adapt to stress is coping (Compas, 1998). Especially within the domain of adolescence, the general pattern of strategies youth use to cope with stress impacts their current and future emotional adjustment (Compas et al., 2001). Coping research with African American youth has found evidence for racial discrimination predicting use of culturally-relevant coping strategies (Gaylord-Harden & Cunningham, 2009) and suggests that low-income African American youths may draw upon other unique and culturally-relevant coping strategies that are not captured on existing measures of universal coping strategies. Culturally-relevant coping strategies attempt to take into account cultural and contextual factors that may affect the manifestation and utilization of coping strategies. Culturally-relevant coping strategies are derived from a particular cultural worldview or orientation (Noh & Kaspar, 2003; Beru, 2002). For African American youth, culturally-relevant coping strategies may be based in an Afrocentric worldview that is rooted in African philosophies and cultural traditions (Utsey, Adams, & Bolden, 2000; Chambers et al., 1998). African American youth possess varying levels of identity with this Africultural orientation (Jagers & Mock, 1993). Spirituality, kinship, identification with the African American community (i.e. collectivism/communalism), and emotional debriefing are hallmark features of this ideology. These coping strategies are reflected in a 34-item measure called the Youth Africultural Coping System Inventory (Y-ACSI; Gaylord-Harden & Utsey, 2007). The four factors of the Y-ACSI include: Emotional Debriefing (managing stress by expressing oneself emotionally and creatively); Spiritual-Centered Coping, (spiritually-based attempts to manage a situation); Maintaining Harmony, (creating a harmonious balance with environmental stimuli and others); and Communalistic/Collectivistic Coping, (coping through relationships with others; Utsey at al., 2000). Given the unique coping patterns of African-American boys, the current study sought to validate the Y-ACSI measure in a sample of African American adolescent males and to examine whether these culturally-relevant coping factors protect against stressors such as racial discrimination. In a sample using 248 African American high-school males (M age=15.15) confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to determine factor loadings of each item for their respective latent factors and hence determine unidimensionality. Preliminary findings demonstrate that the model provided a reasonable fit for the data (Χ2 (21) = 27.318; RMSEA=0.042; CFI=0.991; NNFI=0.984; SRMR=0.046) indicating that the four-factor of the Y-ACSI was replicated in this sample. Additionally, all factor loadings were significant, with the exception of Emotional Debriefing’s influence on the “Creative” parcel. Results underscore the importance of developing culturally-relevant measures to explore and understand the coping processes of this underrepresented group and will be discussed in regard to culturally-derived protective strategies for African American boys in dealing with stressors.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 11229 words || 
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4. Nguyen, Linda., Spitzberg, Brian. and Lee, Carmen. "Coping With Obsessive Relational Intrusion And Stalking: The Role Of Social Support And Coping Strategies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p423757_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigated the social support and coping mediation of the effects of obsessive relational intrusion and stalking victimization on victim symptoms. SEM with over 1000 respondents indicate: (1) Victimization and coping responses predicts symptoms; (2) social support adequacy is weakly related to symptoms; (4) gender moderates these relationships; and (5 the influence of ORI/stalking on negative symptoms is mediated by the use of coping strategies and the adequacy of social support.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Han, Jingjing. and Zheng, Xia. "Coping as Motivational Bias: Physiological Connection Between Motivational Systems and Coping Styles" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1228084_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: By applying the Limited Capacity Model of Motivated Message Processing (LC4MP, Lang, 2003, 2006a, 2006b), this study aims to improve our understanding of coping behavior by examining its relation with dual motivational systems.

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