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2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7024 words || 
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1. Dodd, Melissa. and Supa, Dustin. "Communicating the “Good Life” via Corporate Social Advocacy: The Amplified Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Consumer Purchase Intention, Corporate Financial Performance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p710182_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research explored the impact of organizational stances on social-political issues as an extension of corporate social responsibility (CSR) theory and research. Specifically, using the theory of planned behavior as the theoretical underpinning and a quasi-experimental methodology, the relationship between organizational stances on social-political issues, termed corporate social advocacy, and consumer purchase intention was explored across three experimental social-political conditions (gay marriage, health care reform, and emergency contraception), six organizational conditions (Starbucks, Chick-fil-A, Whole Foods Market, Walmart, Nike, and Hobby Lobby) and one control condition (CSR, in general). Strong support was provided for a predictive relationship between CSA and consumer purchase intention, and the inclusion of CSA data amplified the impact of the regression model in comparison to a control group. Implications for the public relations profession are discussed.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7968 words || 
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2. Kim, Sora., Kim, Soo-Yeon. and Sung, Kang Hoon. "How Fortune 100 Companies are Employing Corporate Communication Strategies on Facebook: Corporate Ability Versus Corporate Social Responsibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 23, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p490749_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Through a quantitative content analysis of corporate Facebook messages, this study examines how Fortune 100 companies are using Facebook in terms of (a) employing corporate ability (CAb), corporate social responsibility (CSR), and hybrid communication strategies, (b) meeting different stakeholders’ expectations, and (c) incorporating interactivity components into social media. The results indicate that companies predominantly employ a CAb strategy over CSR or Hybrid strategy and prioritize customers’ needs over other stakeholders (e.g, stockholders, community members, etc.), implying that there is a clear difference between existing corporate websites and Facebook pages in how to incorporate corporate strategies and address different stakeholders’ needs. Lastly, implications to increase publics’ dialogue participation in social media are provided.

2006 - The Law and Society Association Words: 235 words || 
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3. Backer, Larry. "Multinational Corporations, Transnational Law: The United Nation’s Norms on the Responsibilities of Transnational Corporations as Harbinger of Corporate Social Responsibility in International Law" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Jul 06, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105660_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This article considers the ramifications of current efforts to internationalize the regulation of corporate social responsibility. The primary focus will be on the development by the United Nations of its “Norms on the Responsibilities of Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises With Regard to Human Rights.” The Norms evidence an increasing taste, at the international level, for a shift from a private to a public law basis for corporate regulation. This Article first briefly describes the traditional domestic context of the debates about the so-called “corporate social responsibility” and its relation to basic issues of corporate governance. In Part II, this Article turns to the international law and human rights contexts in which the Norms were conceived. Part III moves to a critical analysis of the Norms themselves in this context of regulatory conflict. The Norms point to potential far reaching changes in global consensus with significant ramifications for American domestic corporate law. Part IV places the Norms in a broader context. It analyzes the Norms, not as substance, but as symptom of two great fundamental changes in the allocation of governance power in a global setting. The Article ends with a consideration of the possible collision between the methodology of the Norms and the principle of democratic governance that forms the basis of a public policy of corporate and state organization, and the convergence of governance norms for states and non-state entities.

2011 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 31 pages || Words: 8413 words || 
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4. Kim, Sora. "Relative effectiveness of prior corporate ability vs. corporate social responsibility associations on public responses in corporate crises" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Grand & Suites Hotel, St. Louis, MO, Aug 10, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p520071_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This experimental study employing both victim and preventable crises supports strong transferring effects of corporate ability (CAb) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) associations on the public’s responses in corporate crises. In addition, CSR associations are found to be more effective than CAb associations in offsetting detrimental damage created by corporate crises. The study argues that the reason for more enduring and salient transferring effects of prior CSR associations in crisis situations is because CSR associations are positioned on a company’s virtue-related dimensions, whereas CAb associations are positioned on its skill-focused dimensions.

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