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2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Coyoli, Julia. "Identifying Corruption: How Anti-Corruption Initiatives' Failure to Correctly Identify Corruption Can Worsen Public Goods Provision" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1349150_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper presents a formal model to explain the ways in which accountability mechanisms may lead to a lower quality of public goods provision. It then utilizes evidence from education bureaucrats in Brazil to test the model’s implications.

2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 437 words || 
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2. Zaloznaya, Marina. "Corrupt Officials or Corrupt Organizations? Institutional Roots of Bureaucratic Corruption" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p559144_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper offers evidence against the popular 'culture of corruption' arguments that are based on the premise that certain countries, particularly developing nations and nations in transition, acquire normative environments or cultures that normalize small-scale bureaucratic corruption, decrease the costs of partner identification, and, consequently, bring about the ubiquitous spread of economic deviance (i.e. Varese 2000). Based on ethnographic observations, interviews with university members (instructors, students, and students’ parents), and content analysis of informal online forums about bribery and nepotistic exchanges in Ukrainian universities, the paper reveals a significant variation in rates and patters of small-scale corruption across different organizations and their sub-units. While some departments and universities are permeated with corruption in admissions processes, grading, and allocation of credentials, others appear to have lower levels of corruption or be completely transparent.

The paper suggests that universities and individual departments develop their own, local cultures of corruption and transparency that mediate national cultures of corruption on the one hand and cost-and-benefit calculations and value judgments of individual organizational members on the other. These local cultures emerge around institutionalized corruption mechanisms and influence organizational members through informal interactions, observations, and transmission of untested assumptions about the possibility, appropriateness, or inevitability of corrupt exchanges within specific bureaucracies. Upon their contact with individual organizations, ordinary Ukrainians are exposed to their informal normative environments, through which they learn corruption-favorable or corruption-unfavorable definitions and, due to potential costs of deviating from ‘the common ways of doing thing’, enact them in their own behaviors. In other words, the decisions to engage in or abstain from corruption are based on organizationally-transmitted ideas rather than ideas acquired from the exposure to national cultures.

The second part of the paper explores the macro-structural roots of different organizational cultures of corruption and transparency. Through the comparative institutional history of six university departments that are identified by the respondents as either ‘pervasively corrupt’, ‘averagely corrupt’, or ‘non-corrupt’, the paper identifies the structural pre-conditions for the emergence of different organizational cultures over time. Specifically, it discusses the importance of such determinants as the size of universities, the organization of the educational process (liberal arts model vs. more technical, focused curriculum), turnover of cadres and percentage of Soviet hires retained after the fall of the Soviet Union, social class of applicants, placement and future earnings of alumni, and salaries of current university employees. It also explores the role of cultural determinants such as prestige of higher educational establishments and the perceived status of credentials issued by them. The discussion offers a model whereby these structural and cultural determinants influence organizational cultures and, eventually, frequency and patterns of deviance in universities.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 154 words || 
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3. de Sa e Silva, Fabio. "Legal Power in the Fight Against Corruption: A Genealogy of the Legal Field and Corruption Control in Contemporary Brazil" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1145796_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Contrary to what political scientists and analysts predicted in the late 2000s, legal practices and institutions have taken a central position in the fight against corruption in Brazil. New tools and mechanisms informed by “managerial” and “societal” perspectives, which were being increasingly recognized as more advantageous avenues to hold public officials accountable, suddenly lost grounds for court proceedings and prosecutorial strategies. What explains this intriguing outcome? Based on a genealogy of the legal field in post-constitutional Brazil, this paper examines the institutional organization of corruption control in light of what it sees as a collective project of mobility by lawyers within the state structure. As public concerns with corruption grew, some of these lawyers managed to reconvert their capitals (or acquire new ones) and invest them in shaping corruption control policies in ways that increased their power. The paper ends by discussing the consequences of these changes to democratic governance and the legal profession.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 163 words || 
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4. Isenring, Giang Ly., Mugellini, Giulia. and Killias, Martin. "The Swiss International Corruption Survey: the Experience of Bribery Requests and the Corruption Perception of Swiss Firms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1144560_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Corruption and corruption perception go hand in hand. The definition of corruption depends on social and cultural factors and so does corruption perception. Even when corruption perception may strongly differ from the level of corruption, the latter influences the former. High levels of corruption perception can have negative if not devastating effects than corruption itself as the distrust towards institutions may in turn raise corruption and create a culture of “paying”, considering this act as justifiable. The Swiss International Corruption Survey presents the results of a study completed in 2015 regarding Swiss firms’ corruption perception in international business activities. Through regression models, the paper illustrates circumstances in which corruption perception might vary as well as the influence of different sources of information on corruption perception (characteristics of the firm, types of activity, foreign countries of business operations, etc.). Furthermore, the paper provides an empirical analysis of the association between the experience of bribe requests, the willingness to pay bribes and the corruption perception.

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