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2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6003 words || 
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1. Hinton, Cynthia. "Secondary Institutional Logics and Professionalization: Race, Resistance, and Sickle Cell Counselors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183932_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Health care occupations in the U.S. exist with a tacit expectation that they exist on a pathway towards professionalization. I explore a secondary institutional logic that appears to support resistance to professionalization on the part of sickle cell counselors. To do so, I revisit the history of sickle cell disease in the United States focusing on the historical legacy of racism and discrimination. Sickle cell disease results from a genetic defect for hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen in red blood cells. Patients can suffer infections, severe pain, anemia, and damage to body organs, and decreased life span. Since the early twentieth century, sickle cell has been identified as a black disease in the United States, which has had implications for racial identity and discrimination. My findings point to the legacy of discrimination, racism, and need for self-determination that affect an occupations ability or willingness to organize. Race played a role in how sickle cell counselors entered the field, and they were aware of the racial politics of the disease. Counselors expressed ambivalence over national certification. Sickle cell counselors do not represent a failed profession, but one that actively resists dominant expectations that occupations will professionalize.

2008 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: 5 pages || Words: 1930 words || 
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2. Gafford Muhammad, Crystal. and Banks-Rogers, Patrice. "African American Students and College Choice: A Consideration of the Role of School Counselors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Buena Vista Palace Hotel and Spa, Orlando, Florida, Oct 30, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p274451_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Counseling from a trustworthy, supportive school counselor can make a difference in stemming African American talent loss, especially from among young black men. Using the National Educational Longitudinal Survey of 1988 (NELS: 88/00) the authors find that African American students’ understanding of their counselors’ expectations for their future education positively influences college predisposition, at a magnitude comparable to fatherly support. Implications for principals and school counselor assignments are addressed.

2009 - The Law and Society Association Words: 236 words || 
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3. Singh, Rashmee. "Disrupting the Local and Global? Cultural Translation amongst Community-Based, Immigrant Violence against Women Counselors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305858_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent scholarship on cultural translators in the global campaign to end gender violence has focused on the roles of activists, community leaders and nongovernmental organizations whose main purpose is to translate and apply global human rights concepts in the local settings in which they work. As knowledge brokers and cultural translators, mediators “vernacularize” and “indigenize” human rights concepts in order to ensure their resonance with local cultural practices, habits and norms (Merry: 2006, 39). This paper will draw on prevailing theorizations of cultural translators, but will invert the lens to examine the roles of immigrants working as violence against women counselors and legal advocates for immigrant victims of abuse in Toronto, Canada.

In exploring the work of diasporic actors negotiating the middle ground between immigrant victims and the criminal justice system, the following questions will be examined: If indigenization involves framing concepts in terms of local symbols and terminology, how do diasporic brokers and translators repackage Canadian legal norms to immigrant communities? How does framing work within the context of diaspora, where neither the cultural translators nor the communities targeted for intervention are in their original or “local” settings? And finally, how might the work and positioning of the immigrant cultural translator disrupt binaries of the “local” and “global”? This paper will draw upon data acquired through interviews with immigrant settlement workers and violence against counselors working in community organizations throughout Toronto.

2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6008 words || 
Info
4. Kolb, Kenneth. "Professional Risk-taking: Biographical Work among Victim Counselors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p408754_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Counselors at agencies that assist victims of domestic violence (DV) and sexual assault (SA) argue that they are especially suited to help their clients develop safe and practical strategies to protect themselves from further physical and emotional abuse. Yet, the backstage of these agencies can depict a reality of confusion, doubt, and sometimes fear—especially when clients’ cases do not go according to plan. Data collected from in-depth interviews and participant observation over a period of fourteen months show how counselors engaged in “biographical work” (Gubrium and Holstein 2000) to construct coherent and consistent narratives as competent service providers in the aftermath of their clients’ unanticipated outcomes. Calling upon discursive strategies accessible to them as professionals, the counselors were able to interpret negative results as beyond their responsibility.

2011 - AWP Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 262 words || 
Info
5. Bates, Dawn. and Gonzalez, Dianna. "The Impact of Counselor’s Nonverbal Religious Disclosures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AWP Annual Conference, Hyatt Regency Philadelphia at Penns Landing, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 03, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p488119_index.html>
Publication Type: POSTER
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores the impact of counselors’ nonverbal disclosures on participants who viewed a photograph of a counselor wearing a particular piece of religious jewelry representing one religion. The data analysis examines whether participants rated counselors who had similar religious beliefs differently than counselors who had different beliefs.

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