Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 3,817 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 764 - Next  Jump:
2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 44 pages || Words: 13080 words || 
Info
1. Claessens, Stijn., Underhill, Geoffrey. and Zhang, Xiaoke. "Basle II Capital Requirements and Developing Countries: a Political Economy Perspective on the Costs for Poor Countries of Rich Country Policies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p73420_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The 1990s financial crises have triggered changes to the international financial system, the so-called international financial architecture. While much affected, developing countries have had very little influence on the changes, which the formulation of the new Basle capital accord (Basle II, B-II) illustrates. We show that B-II has largely been formulated to advance the interests of powerful market players, at the expense of those of developing economies. For these countries, B-II can raise the costs of and reduce the access to external financing. Importantly, B-II can exacerbate fluctuations in the availability of external financing, an unfortunate outcome, given that developing countries already suffer from volatile capital flows.

2014 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7249 words || 
Info
2. Wu, Linwan. and JU, ILYOUNG. "The Cognitive and Affective Effects of Country-of-Origin: How Consumers Process Country-of-Assembly and Country-of-Design for High and Low Involvement Products" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Le Centre Sheraton, Montreal, Canada, Aug 06, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p744834_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A study was conducted to investigate how COA and COD information is processed by consumers for high and low involvement products. Results indicated that COA was more likely to be processed cognitively, while COD tended to be processed affectively. For high involvement products, the only presentation of COD with a positive image elicited the most favorable affective product evaluation. For low involvement products, no difference of cognitive product evaluation was detected.

2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 463 words || 
Info
3. Kim, Hyungryeol. and Byun, Soo-Yong. "Immigration Policy and Immigrant Adolescents’ Attitudes towards Immigrant Rights and the Host Country: Evidence from 17 Countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, Mar 05, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1216464_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Facing the phenomenal surge of international migration during the past two decades, most countries are hosting a large and growing population of immigrants, a substantial number of whom are school-age children. While much prior research has investigated immigrant adolescents’ socioeconomic integration in the host country (e.g., their labor market assimilation or educational achievement and attainment), relatively less attention has been given to how immigrant children and children of immigrants understand their rights in the host country, and how they evaluate their newly found home. Further, less is known to how such immigrant adolescents’ attitudes toward immigrant rights and attitudes toward their host country differ across countries, particularly depending on a country’s immigration policy. To address these gaps in our knowledge, this study investigates cross-national differences in immigrant adolescents’ attitudes toward immigrant rights and attitudes toward their host country and how country-level immigration policy may explain, if any, such cross-national differences over and above individual-level characteristics.

Toward this end, using data from 2009 International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS), combined with immigration policy indices from 2007 Migrant Integration Policy Index (MIPEX), this study first examines the magnitude of differences in (1) attitudes toward immigrant rights and (2) attitudes toward their country between immigrant and nonimmigrant adolescents for 17 countries, controlling for other individual variables (e.g., socioeconomic status, age, gender, etc.). Second, we investigate whether the degree to which the host country’s policies for immigrant integration are exclusionary/inclusionary is related to cross-national variation in immigrant/nonimmigrant differences in these two outcome variables. Among others, we focus on four domains of immigration policies: Political participation, education, citizenship acquisition, and anti-discrimination.

Our preliminary results from the two-level hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses suggest that in general immigrant adolescents are more supportive to equal rights for immigrants but less positive towards the host country compared to nonimmigrant adolescents in many countries, even after controlling for other individual-level characteristics, and that such the degree of immigrant/nonimmigrant differences in attitudes towards immigrant rights and the host country differs across countries. Further, results reveal that country-level immigration policy contexts contribute to explaining cross-national differences in attitudes toward immigrant rights and attitudes toward the host country between immigrant and nonimmigrant adolescents, even after controlling for individual-level characteristics. Specifically, we find that immigrant adolescents in countries with inclusionary immigration policies are more supportive to equal rights for immigrants and more positive towards the host country than their counterpart immigrants in countries with exclusionary immigration policies. In the full paper, we will include more sophisticate analyses, including but not limited to testing interactions between socioeconomic background and immigration status, and more fully discuss theoretical and policy implications of our findings.

2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 590 words || 
Info
4. Hu, Yu. "Comparing the Mediation Effect of Learning Environment Between Confucian Countries and Anglo Countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, Mar 05, 2017 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1216466_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Students from Confucian countries such as South Korea and Japan have earned the top performance in all three subjects in Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 (OECD, 2012). Confucianism, which is a unique ethical and philosophical system, prizes traditional values in educational philosophy, such as “respecting teachers” and “maintaining discipline.” These Confucian beliefs and traditions deeply affect both the pedagogy of teachers and students’ behavior in school, thus creating a specific learning environment. Thus, estimating the effect of learning environment on students’ learning outcome would help to explain why Confucian students have such a high performance.
This study seeks to estimate the mediation effect of learning environment between social-economic background and mathematics achievement in Confucian countries and Anglo countries. According to the cultural clusters identified by Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE), in PISA 2012, Shanghai-China, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea and Singapore are representative of the Confucian culture. Countries and regions such as Chinese-Macao, which misses certain variables, are not included in this data. In this study, Anglo countries have been chosen because major Western countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom are in this cultural cluster, and the comparison between Western and Eastern values has proven a persistent debate among researchers from different cultural backgrounds. Thus, 85,599 students from 885 schools are analyzed in this data. Based on the two-stage sampling design of PISA, student-level sample weights and school clusters are applied to the analysis. Multiple imputation is used to assign values to missing data.
The theoretical model applied in this research is Astin’s (1970a, 1970b, 1991) Input-Environment-Output model, which defined learning outcomes are considered an amalgamation of three sets of elements: input, including students’ demographic characteristics, family backgrounds and prior schooling experience; environment, including the experiences that students have in college; and outcomes, including students’ knowledge, skills, attitudes, values, beliefs and behaviors as they exist after school. Although the I-E-O model was developed in a college context, it could also be used in K-12 schools, as in PISA 2012, which had a well-designed framework of input (students’ demographic characteristics), environment (learning environment and school characteristics) and outcomes (reading, mathematics and science achievements).
Based on Astin’s I-E-O model, this research proposes to first use multiple linear regression to estimate the total effect of family background on students’ mathematics performance in PISA 2012. Next, three environmental variables (disciplinary climate, student-teacher relations, teacher behavior) are added in the model predicting the latent variable environment, following the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) design. The disciplinary climate is the main indicator of an orderly learning environment, so it is chosen to be the reference indicator to factor environment. In addition, direct effect from both family background on the latent variable environment, and from the environment to mathematics achievement are added into the model so that the indirect and direct effect of students’ family background on mathematics achievement can be estimated. Finally, based on the result of the previous steps, check if the mediation of learning environment is significant or not in both Confucian countries and Anglo countries, and compare the proportion of the effect of family background is explained by the mediator in each cultural group. The results show that in Confucian countries, almost 40% of the relationship between family SES and students’ mathematics achievement is accounted for the learning environment as the mediator, and the mediation effect is smaller in Anglo countries. The result implies that school characteristics and learning climate within the schools are very important indicators that would affect the students’ learning outcome.

2010 - 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 226 words || 
Info
5. Pong, Suet-Ling., Chiu, Ming Ming. and Mori, Izumi. "Immigrant Students' Sense of Belonging at School in 41 Countries: Country, Family, School, and Student Factors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400013_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The need to belong is fundamental, and the degree to which people satisfy this need can substantially affect many aspects of their lives. Although a sense of belonging can apply to a variety of situations, sense of belonging at school (SOBAS) might be particularly salient for immigrant adolescents. Immigrant children have to leave their friends and relatives back home. They may not be able to develop a sense of belonging in a new country. On the other hand, past research has shown that immigrant adolescents perform as well as, if not better than, native students. They are also found to be less likely to engage in risk behaviors, such as drinking, smoking, substance use, and early sex. It is unclear, however, whether immigrant children’s well adjustment to the new school system means that their SOBAS is also high. This paper uses data from the Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 to examine these alternative hypotheses regarding immigrant adolescents’ SOBAS. We ask if SOBAS among immigrant adolescents varies across the family, school, and country contexts. Preliminary results suggest that SOBAS is positively associated with students’ socioeconomic background, family involvement and investment, positive school climate, and schoolmates’ characteristics. Further analysis will investigate how a country’s economic development, cultural orientation, and political system account for differences in immigrant students’ SOBAS.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 764 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy