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2013 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: 8180 words || 
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1. Radovic, Ivanka. and Imre, Iveta. "Believing the News: The Effects of Type of Journalist and Type of Sources on Reporter Credibility, Article Credibility, and Organizational Credibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hotel (LVH), Las Vegas, NV, Apr 07, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p630731_index.html>
Publication Type: Debut Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In a 2x4 between-subjects experimental design, this study explored the impact of different types of journalists (professional and citizen) and use of different sources in their news stories (official, unofficial, both, and none) on the credibility of reporters, their articles, and organizations for which they work or publish. In contradiction to previous literature, the results indicate that participants did not perceive professional reporters or their articles as more credible than citizen reporters and their articles. On the other hand, participants distinguished between different types of news organizations when it came to the perceptions of their credibility. Professional medium (Associated Press) was perceived as significantly more credible than citizen journalism website (NowPublic.com). The results are interpreted in light of branding theory. A need for further research in order to account for media brand influence on perceptions of organizational credibility is indicated.

Keywords: news media credibility, professional journalist, citizen journalist, media brand, use of sources

2009 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 100 words || 
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2. Connolly, Deborah. and Gordon, Heidi. "Trading credibility of the complainant for credibility of the accused: Logical fallacies in credibility assessments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, TBA, San Antonio, TX, Mar 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p295828_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Undergraduates read vignettes describing an allegation of sexual assault or a motor vehicle accident. The vignette included information that increased credibility of the complainant/witness, decreased her credibility, or discussed the burden of proof. Factors that increased credibility of the complainant/witness did not influence credibility of the accused when the complainant/witness was described as 5- or 13-years old. However, when she was described as 20-years old, factors that decreased her credibility also increased the credibility of the accused. These data are discussed in the context of breaches to principles of fundamental justice that could lead to wrongful convictions or wrongful acquittals.

2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 7389 words || 
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3. Luo, Yunjuan. and Zhang, Hongzhong. "Web Credibility in China: Comparing Internet and Traditional News Sources on Credibility Measures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p669640_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: China has the largest Internet population in the world. The rapid increase of Internet use has raised the question of whether the Internet is judged to be a more credible news source compared to the traditional media. Based on probability sample telephone surveys in two major Chinese cities, this study found that the Internet was judged as less credible than television and newspapers, but it was perceived to be more credible than other traditional news sources such as radio and magazines. Internet use was the strongest predictor of Web credibility. Newspaper use and television use were found to be negatively correlated with Web credibility. Some demographic variables such as age and education also turned out to be significant predictors.

2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 6976 words || 
Info
4. Mahone, Jessica. "Attribution, Credibility, and Conspiracy: Source Attribution and the Credibility of Online Conspiracy Theory Media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575038_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The openness of the Internet has given alternative political and social movements greater opportunity to disseminate messages to the mass audience than ever before. Using an online survey experiment with 120 participants, this study explores the effects of four levels of source attribution on the perceived credibility of online conspiracy theory media. Findings suggest that attribution has little effect on credibility, but the content of conspiracy theory messages may influence the credibility of attributed sources.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 250 words || 
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5. Wurtz, Kelly. "Depositing Credibility: Capital Account Liberalization, Dollarization, and Government Credibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-09-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p250953_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In many developing countries, individuals have lost faith in their domestic currency and have chosen to use a competing currency. While the effects of such “dollarization” are still under investigation, no attention has been paid to the political decision to allow such deposits in the first place.I argue that credibility is key to understanding this decision. Economically, individual choices of currency use depend on the credibility of their local government to preserve the value of the currency. Similar to other forms of monetary delegation (hard pegs, currency unions), allowing FC deposits is a commitment device that allows politicians to increase the credibility of their local currency. Politically, the shift from restricted to unrestricted deposits represents a shift from the logic of private goods provision to those of public goods. If a government is not credible in its offer to expand its coalition, potential members will not respond and switch their support, leaving the government with displeased former constituents and insufficient new coalition members. In this situation, non-credible governments will prefer to remain partially liberalized. I use event discrete-time event history analysis to test my argument and find that governments that combine credibility on respect for property rights, but lack such credibility on macroeconomic stability, are more likely to allow their residents to open and maintain unrestricted foreign currency deposits. Allowance of unrestricted FC deposits is also positively associated with the spread of liberalization in the region and negatively associated with a country’s external debt position and an open capital account.

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