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2013 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: 8180 words || 
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1. Radovic, Ivanka. and Imre, Iveta. "Believing the News: The Effects of Type of Journalist and Type of Sources on Reporter Credibility, Article Credibility, and Organizational Credibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hotel (LVH), Las Vegas, NV, Apr 07, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p630731_index.html>
Publication Type: Debut Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In a 2x4 between-subjects experimental design, this study explored the impact of different types of journalists (professional and citizen) and use of different sources in their news stories (official, unofficial, both, and none) on the credibility of reporters, their articles, and organizations for which they work or publish. In contradiction to previous literature, the results indicate that participants did not perceive professional reporters or their articles as more credible than citizen reporters and their articles. On the other hand, participants distinguished between different types of news organizations when it came to the perceptions of their credibility. Professional medium (Associated Press) was perceived as significantly more credible than citizen journalism website (NowPublic.com). The results are interpreted in light of branding theory. A need for further research in order to account for media brand influence on perceptions of organizational credibility is indicated.

Keywords: news media credibility, professional journalist, citizen journalist, media brand, use of sources

2009 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 100 words || 
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2. Connolly, Deborah. and Gordon, Heidi. "Trading credibility of the complainant for credibility of the accused: Logical fallacies in credibility assessments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, TBA, San Antonio, TX, Mar 04, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p295828_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Undergraduates read vignettes describing an allegation of sexual assault or a motor vehicle accident. The vignette included information that increased credibility of the complainant/witness, decreased her credibility, or discussed the burden of proof. Factors that increased credibility of the complainant/witness did not influence credibility of the accused when the complainant/witness was described as 5- or 13-years old. However, when she was described as 20-years old, factors that decreased her credibility also increased the credibility of the accused. These data are discussed in the context of breaches to principles of fundamental justice that could lead to wrongful convictions or wrongful acquittals.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 6483 words || 
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3. Yoon, Youngmin. "Who is Credible? An Investigation of Source Credibility and News Coverage" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14333_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examines the relationship between source credibility and news coverage of organizations involved in the stem cell and/or cloning debate. Medical, health, or science journalists were asked to rate 30 different organizations on their credibility—trustworthiness, accuracy, fairness, and bias. The study also involved a content analysis of 883 news stories to rate how the news content portrayed those 30 organizations in terms of five indicators of news coverage. The findings suggest that source credibility is related to the quality aspect of news coverage, such as regular and positive coverage, whereas it is not related to the amount of news coverage.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 35 words || 
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4. Pisa, Michael. "Credibility Lost, Credibility Regained?: The Political Economy of Exiting from a Fixed Exchange Rate Regime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p84826_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper looks to measure the degree to which governments lose their credibilty in maintaining low-inflation when they either choose, or are forced, to move from a rigid exchange rate to a more flexible one.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7583 words || 
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5. Guillory, Jamie., Byrne, Sahara., Mathios, Alan. and Avery, Rosemary. "Legitimize It: The Added Value of Credible Co-sponsor Endorsements on Perceived Credibility and Persuasive Effectiveness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p427685_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Communication campaigns engineered by sponsors lacking in credibility struggle in efforts to persuade audiences. One solution to this problem is partnering with a more legitimate or credible organization, such as a respected public health agency to improve credibility perceptions. In this paper, the added value of partnering with more legitimate sponsors is investigated in the context of smoking cessation with tobacco and pharmaceutical-sponsored advertisements, and in the context of cholesterol maintenance with pharmaceutical-sponsored advertisements

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