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2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 147 words || 
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1. Kutateladze, Besiki. "Westernizing the Criminal Justice Systems of Eastern European Countries: From the Soviet Criminal Process to the Inquisitorial-Accusatorial Criminal Trials" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 14, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201719_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Eastern European nations faced the dilemma of either maintaining the Soviet criminal justice system or westernizing it. A desire to join the Council of Europe and the European Union forced many newly independent nations to harmonize their justice systems according to Western parameters. This included serious changes ranging from providing more rights to a criminal defendant (e.g., requiring a judicial control over searches and seizures) to the abolition of the death penalty. Some of the ideas were borrowed from the Continental European legal system and its Inquisitorial criminal process. This transformation was relatively painless since the Soviet Criminal Justice System always closely resembled the criminal process of Western Europe. However, several countries (e.g., Russia) began introducing the elements of Accusatorial trials, including a jury trials. This paper will focus on the difficulties of westernization of Eastern European criminal justice systems.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 182 words || 
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2. Hong, Moonki. "Replicating Previous Findings: Examining Different Attitudes About Criminal Justice Policies Among Non-Traditional Criminal Justice and Non-Criminal Justice Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1032405_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many criminal justice students aspire to work as professionals within the criminal justice system after graduation. More than students pursuing other majors on campus, criminal justice students may be employed in a position to influence or implement criminal justice operations and policies while working in the system. Therefore, it is important to know how criminal justice students form their attitudes about the criminal justice system. In order to acquire this knowledge, there has been many previous research efforts aimed at answering two questions: (1) Do criminal justice majors have more or less punitive attitudes about criminal justice policies and the punishment of offenders than other majors do? (2) What factors are associated with punitive attitudes, if criminal justice majors are more punitive than other majors are?
While many previous research studies have been conducted to reach a definitive conclusion about the effects of criminal justice education on students’ punitive attitudes, most of these studies have relied only on the data collected from traditional undergraduate students. To our knowledge, there has been no empirical research using a nontraditional undergraduate student sample.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 189 words || 
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3. Faruk, Md. "The Bio-Chemical Factors Associated with Criminality in Bangladesh: An Experimental Study on Criminal and Non-Criminal Activity in Dhaka City." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1032563_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Biological theories of crime suggest that physiological and chemical factors can cause criminality among individuals. In this study we investigate whether bio-chemical factors including testosterone, adrenaline, hypoglycemia lead to the development of criminal instincts or criminal tendency. The analysis utilized data from high level of adrenaline and criminality were found to be positively correlated (r=0.419, P<0.001) and high level of testosterone and criminality were found to be highly correlated (r=0.667, P<0.001). On the other hands, hypoglycemia and criminality were found to be moderately correlated (r=-0.4.86, P<0.001). This study also examined to socio-demographic conditions of the individuals affect the bio-chemical factors of the individuals. This study has been conduct during the period of June to December 2014. The experimental group were included the prisoners who were incarcerated at Dhaka Central Jail, and the control group is non-criminal people to be chosen depending on the purpose and the willingness of the respondents who has given blood samples. The total size of the sample was 110 out of which 55 are prisoners for the experimental group and 55 from non-criminal respondents for the control group.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 203 words || 
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4. Rivera, Luis. "Measuring the Criminal Mind: Do Implicit Criminal Identities Predict Criminal Behavior and Intent?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1031702_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Criminal behavior is difficult to predict because people who consider committing a crime often are unwilling or unable to report their explicit criminal cognition. Advances in implicit social cognition theory and methodology provide an opportunity to test whether automatic associations of self with criminality can provide a behavioral marker for criminal involvement. The present research adopted a longitudinal design to test if an implicit criminal identity predicts criminal behavior and intentions. Specifically, at Time 1, we recruited an adult community sample from Newark, New Jersey, a city in the United States with one of the highest crime rates that is often ranked as one of the country’s most dangerous cities. In a laboratory setting, we measured participants implicit associations about self and criminality. At Time 2, at least one year later, we contacted participants and inquired about their criminal behavioral intentions and actual criminal involvement. This paper will present the results of the first empirical and longitudinal test of a criminal behavioral marker and suggest that measures of implicit cognition may be useful for detecting and predicting crime above and beyond criminal cognition unlikely to be reported. The implications of this research for preventing crime will be discussed.

2009 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 102 words || 
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5. Shaw, Julia. and Hart, Stephen. "Once a Criminal, Always a Criminal? A Statistical Comparison of International Rehabilitation Programs and Recidivism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, TBA, San Antonio, TX, Mar 05, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-12-07 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p295527_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper discusses the outcomes, implications, and complications of the first documented attempt at conducting comparative international recidivism research from a forensic psychological perspective. National crime statistics relating to recidivism rates for offenders released from prison from 17 countries were analyzed. There were large cross-national differences in recidivism rates. A number of socio-structural factors – reflecting the quality of health care, education, criminal justice, and other social services, as well as economic productivity – were evaluated as potential correlates of recidivism rates, delineating some apparent correlates. Limitations of data concerning national recidivism rates are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.

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