Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 4,058 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 812 - Next  Jump:
2017 - 88th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 182 words || 
Info
1. Clary, Matthew., Clary, Virginia. and Owsiak, Andrew. "Causing a Crisis: Simulating Interstate Crisis Conditions as a Learning Exercise in Crisis Diplomacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 88th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 11, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-03-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1203092_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Students often struggle to understand complex political processes – such as the challenges of multilateral bargaining, cooperating in anarchically (as opposed to hierarchically) ordered environments, and creating policy under conditions of threat, competition, and time pressure. In order to offer students greater insight into these processes, this article therefore presents a simulation that replicates crisis conditions. Unlike other similar exercises, our simulation asks students to bargain simultaneously both within their individual governments to create policy and across governments using Twitter as a means of diplomatic communication to manage the crisis. Furthermore, we use real-world, as opposed to fictitious, issues and actors, in our exercise, which imbibes it with a sense of urgency and veracity. Through such a simulation, instructors can therefore teach students in a wide variety of courses about complex political processes across the domestic-international politics divide. Indeed, students report through collected survey data that they directly experience and better understand the logic behind the concepts they read and hear about in our courses, giving us great confidence that the exercise reinforces the concepts, themes, and learning objectives of our courses.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9088 words || 
Info
2. Kim, Young. "Understanding Publics’ Perception and Behaviors in Crisis Communication: Effects of Crisis News Framing and Publics’ Acquisition, Selection, and Transmission of Information in Crisis Situations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-03-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983734_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to better understand publics’ perception and communicative behaviors in crisis communication. Crisis communication research has focused on the relationship between crisis news framing (crisis type) and crisis responsibility rather than actual outcomes such as reputation and behavioral intentions. Moreover, the extant research has overlooked different publics’ communicative behaviors, influencing the crisis outcomes. To fill the gap, this study conducted an online experiment with 1,113. This study found the direct and negative effects of crisis news framing (preventable crisis news framing) on crisis outcomes. Applying Situational Theory of Problem Solving (STOPS) to crisis communication, the results revealed that communicative actions (information attending, forwarding, and seeking) are positively associated with reputation and behavioral intentions. Theoretical and practical implications for future research and practices are discussed.

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 206 words || 
Info
3. Krishnarajan, Suthan. "Crisis, What Crisis? Unpacking the Crisis-Democracy Relationship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-03-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1247555_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An extensive large-N literature has demonstrated that economic crises consistently and significantly increase the risk of democratic breakdown. However, small-N comparative studies scrutinizing specific crisis episodes find only weak and inconsistent crisis-effects. I argue that these disagreements stem from an inadequate measurement of economic crisis in the large-N literature. The standard annual growth rate in GDP/capita measurement approach utilized by all large-N studies suffers from several shortcomings that lead to misguided conclusions. These are 1) inadequate specification of duration and 2) depth of crisis, 3) sensitive coefficients, 4) confusing the stabilizing effects of positive growth with the destabilizing effects of crisis, and 5) no inclusion of financial crisis components. By building on the works of economists, I present a new measurement approach that distinguishes between sovereign debt slumps, inflation slumps, banking slumps, currency slumps, and pure real-economic slumps. From this vantage point the paper shows that the effect of economic crises on democratic breakdowns is highly conditional on the type of crisis: democracies are very resilient to inflation-, currency-, and banking-slumps, while being highly vulnerable to sovereign debt slumps. By providing empirical evidence of such conditional crisis-effects this paper provides a way to bridge the disagreements in the literature and offers avenues for further crisis research.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 812 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy