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2013 - International Communication Association Words: 95 words || 
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1. Hamilton, James. "Critical advertising studies (should) meet(s) critical marketing studies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p679200_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: This paper addresses the common heritage and opportunities missed so far in the in many ways parallel research agendas of critical advertising studies and critical marketing studies. While both draw upon an in many ways similar range of critical-cultural theory, the often predominant textualism typical of much of critical advertising studies would benefit from the larger structural and historical perspective of much of critical marketing studies. This paper concludes by suggesting a number of research topic areas in which scholars in the two fields might collaborate to generate greater critical understanding of advertising and marketing.

2012 - 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 579 words || 
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2. Wang, Chenyu. "The relevance of critical pedagogy in Chinese secondary classrooms – Towards developing critical thinking ability and social justice literacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Apr 22, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p551089_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The world has witnessed China’s economic take-off during the last three decades. This growth has led to an extraordinary improvement in Chinese people’s living standards and to an unprecedented decline in poverty. However, along with the tremendous growth, growing disparities in earning and opportunities have been equally alarming. According to World Bank’s report on China, inequality has resulted in unequal distribution of household income and consumption, as well as inequality on important social outcomes such as health status and educational attainment. To make the situation worse, China faces serious natural resource scarcity and environmental degradation because of huge drive for industrialization. The government has tried certain measures addressing these inequalities and problems, such as encouraging migration, increasing funding for education and providing healthcare for people in poor areas and poor households. But as a whole, there need to be a strong civil society that advocate for the poor and form strong voices against environmental breakdown and corruption. The young generation of Chinese citizens must play a pivotal role in the China’s overall social development.

However, in China, students study for the goal of achieving personal material success much greater than for engagement in causes for social equality and justice, and for sustainability. Science-track is much preferred over humanity-track; moral education, service-learning activities towards greater societal goals – such as environmental protection, human rights protection – are more often than not neglected. What is more, Chinese students suffer from pressure of the National University Entrance Examination (NUEE), the golden key to post-secondary education, rendering knowledge recitation and repetition as the main component of their education. This pressure also dictates secondary school pedagogy: teachers teach towards tests without considering critical thinking ability and social justice literacy as a key component in student development. With this limitation, the new generation of Chinese citizens is not capable of think critically with concerns for social justice and equality. For China to advance socially as living standards improve, I would argue that critical pedagogy and social justice education should be introduced into children’s life.

In this paper, I first identify key pedagogical elements in the process of developing critical thinking ability and social justice literacy, including critical pedagogy, experiential learning and social justice identity development theory. Bringing Chinese secondary education into discourse, I then argue the relevance of critical pedagogy in Chinese education. I analyze reasons of resistance towards critical pedagogy and social justice literacy within the classroom and outside the classroom. Further, against the Chinese political and social background, possibility of critical, justice literacy education is explored in both public and private education. Within the domain of public education, as the Ministry of Education in China has already begun to decentralize the secondary education curricula, I call for a new localized curriculum. Moral education and service-learning programs targeted at increasing critical thinking ability and social justice literacy should be included. Quality standards of secondary education should be expanded and localized. It should be aimed at producing individuals who are not only equipped with the knowledge and skills to contribute to economic growth and development, but also to the construction of an equal, just and sustainable country. In the domain of private education, the more open environment for teachers and administrators should be used to foster critical thinking ability and social justice literacy. Several recommendations to teachers and policy maker are drawn at the end of this paper. The purpose of this paper is to envision and make practical recommendations of critical pedagogy to Chinese secondary education.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 188 words || 
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3. McCormack, Tara. "What is Critical about Critical Security Theory?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p250965_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Critical security theorists often present themselves as radical, critical voices on the margins, critiquing the state-centric pluralist security framework which has dominated our conception of security and, more broadly, political organisation for centuries. In place of this, critical security theorists argue that security theory must challenge contemporary power structures and be for the purposes of emancipation. Critical security theorists develop a critique of the state and argue that agents of emancipation are to be found in the international realm. In this paper, I develop and expand upon Beate Jahn’s critique of critical theory and argue that contemporary critical security theory fails to live up to its own ideals, it can neither challenge contemporary power structures nor emancipate the individual. Critical security theorists ignore the critical necessity of a concrete engagement with actually occurring international relations. Rather than offering a challenge to contemporary power relations, critical security theorists are reflecting many of the most salient shifts in post-Cold War international security policy and discourse, such as 'human security' and the problematisation of the Third World state, and the increased freedom for the international community to intervene in other states.

2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
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4. Zakeri, Bita. "Decolonizing Inquiry: Merits of Critical Qualitative Research and Critical Autoethnography in Examining Multicultural/Transnational Identities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1112914_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper discusses the significance of critical qualitative research methodology in the field of social sciences, highlighting the richness and depth of results attained through qualitative analytical methods in exploring sociocultural issues. Drawing on autoethnographic inquiry exploring complexities of the researcher’s struggles as a transnational immigrant woman in the US, along with comparison of experiences with other participants from cases studies in the research, this paper stresses the importance of critical qualitative research methods in addressing issues of ethnicity, race, gender, and social justice. The purpose of this inquiry is twofold: i) to underline the power of critical qualitative inquiry and its analytical scope; ii) to demonstration the merits of including autoethnography as part of critical qualitative study to enhance the researcher’s awareness of his/her own biases and positionality within the research in order to advance his/her understanding of the issue under inquiry from both empirical and methodological perspectives.

2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 150 words || 
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5. Cook, William. "Critical research interviews for critical policy research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1110599_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper asks critical policy researchers to re-examine their methodological and analytical approaches to interviews. With a focus on interview methods and data, it starts with the question: Do critical policy researchers approach interviews with the same critical lens that they apply to policy? It begins by exploring how these researchers define policy and position themselves in policy research generally, extracting the underlying epistemological assumptions that support these definitions. Second, this paper outlines epistemological debates in qualitative research and situates different interview practices within these different qualitative epistemologies. Third, a review of a sample of critical education policy articles from the last ten years is presented, concluding that critical policy researchers do not generally approach their interview methods and analyses critically. Finally, examples of critical interview methods from policy research and other fields are offered as ways to better align the interview methods and the epistemologies of critical policy work.

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