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2012 - AECT International Convention Words: 71 words || 
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1. Wang, Chun-Min (Arthur). "Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultural Online Collaboration: The Perspectives from Taiwanese College Students Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultural Online Collaboration: The Perspectives from Taiwanese College Students Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultura" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AECT International Convention, The Galt House, Louisville, KY, Oct 30, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574479_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, a Web 2.0 tool called VoiceThread was applied into a cross-cultural collaboration project between the college students from the United States and Taiwan. By analyzing Taiwanese students’ reflection essays and the questionnaire regarding the overall learning experience, the study intends to identify important elements of designing and developing cross-cultural online learning environment, and also suggests how to better use VoiceThread in cross-cultural projects for teaching and learning purpose.

2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 134 words || 
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2. Stirling, Kirsten. ""Cross your joy in crosses": John Donne and Luther’s Theology of the Cross" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p752722_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In an article published in 2007 I argued that the “picture of Christ crucified” marked in the heart in Donne’s Holy Sonnet “What if this present were the world’s last night” could be interpreted in the light of Luther’s ambivalent attitude towards the internal visualization of the crucifix. In this paper I would like to extend the argument to compare that internal crucifix with other representations of the cross in Donne’s poetry and sermons, with particular focus on “The Cross”, “Good Friday, 1613. Riding Westward”, and the crucifixion scene described at the end of “Death’s Duell”. I argue that Donne’s crucifixes, both insistently present and yet difficult to contemplate, can be read as attempts to negotiate both Reformation suspicion of images and, in a larger sense, Donne’s understanding of Luther’s theology of the cross.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 190 words || 
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3. DeMichele, Matthew. and Stamatel, Janet. "Comparing Time-Series-Cross-Section Methods for Cross-National Crime and Justice Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p516601_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A common problem in quantitative, cross-national crime and justice research is small sample sizes, which are a function of a relatively small universe of units of analysis and limitations in quantitative data availability.  Many researchers compensate for this problem by pooling data for available countries across several years and then adjusting for modeling complications using fixed- and/or random-effects.  While this approach is commonly used for the analysis of panel data, time-series-cross-section data present unique methodological challenges because the time-series is usually larger than the number of countries and because the speed of change in variables across time for cross-national research is typically much slower than for individual-level research.  There have been several developments to try to improve the analytical techniques for time-series-cross-section data in other social science disciplines that have not been widely adopted in criminal justice research.  This paper empirically assesses the strengths and limitations of some of these techniques.  Specifically, this paper replicates John Sutton's analysis of "The Political Economy of Imprisonment in Affluent Western Democracies, 1960-1990" using fixed-effects models and then compares the results to analyses using panel-corrected standard errors (PCSE) and fixed-effect vector decomposition (FEVD) models.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 480 words || 
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4. Kato, Sota. "Bifurcated Processes of Institutional Change: Cross-National and Cross-Sectoral Comparison" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p732046_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Among current flourishing research over institutions and institutional change in social science, the process of institutional change, whether it is incremental or abrupt, has recently been one of the most intensely debated issues. A group of historical institutionalists has criticized earlier institutional analyses for their inability in explaining incremental institutional change. They claim that the punctuated equilibrium view of institutional change, one of the mainstream views that regard institutional change as an occasional abrupt change caused by exogenous shock, can only explain limited patterns of institutional changes taking place in the real world. Although they admit that institutional change is sometimes abrupt and discontinuous, in their view, such is rather an exception than the rule.
Although few institutionalists have directly responded to the critique of a group of historical institutionalists, a number of institutionalists have engaged in closely related research concerning processes of institutional change. On one hand, there are groups of institutionalists who claim that the punctuated equilibrium view of institutional change is more commonly observed phenomena than incremental institutional change; on the other hand, notwithstanding the group of historical institutionalists’ critique, several institutionalists have indeed eagerly attempted to model incremental process of institutional change.
In this paper, I first theoretically analyze processes of institutional change and investigate when and why different patterns of institutional change take place. Recent debates over institution and institutional change have tended to focus on overly conceptual arguments trying to find out a fundamental principle that governs all the institutions and their changes. Although this paper is based on rational choice approach of institution, it does not intend to establish a single pattern of the process of institutional change. Instead, it hypothesizes bifurcated processes of institutional change, one incremental and another abrupt, and explains why such bifurcation occurs for different types of institutions. I first define two types of institutions; “government centered institution” and “private centered institution.” I then theoretically show that the former changes abruptly, following the punctuated equilibrium view of institutional change, and the latter changes incrementally as the group of historical institutionalists asserted.
On the empirical side of this topic, although successful analyses are rapidly developing, most of them focus on case studies. Large-n statistical analyses should enable us to better specify when and why different patterns of institutional change occur. In this paper, hypotheses were statistically tested against both cross-sectoral and cross national datasets. The former was collected from the Japanese experience during 1990-2005. During that period, the Japanese government and firms attempted to execute an extensive institutional change. As for the latter, I organized OECD data that shows how labor related laws and customs have changed since 1990s. The results of the empirical tests mostly confirmed hypotheses derived from my theoretical claim. Government centered institutions change significantly and substantially faster than private centered institutions once they start to change. Private centered institutions, on the other hand, change slowly but steadily.

2014 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Kang, Taewoo. "The asymmetric nature of cross-pressure among the public: Are Republicans more cross-pressured than Democrats?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Ergife Palace Hotel, Rome, Italy, Jul 04, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/MSWORD>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p727778_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent literature on political polarization suggests that elite polarization is asymmetric (Barber and McCarty 2013). How about the electorate? In this paper, I theorize and hypothesize that the level of ideological thinking among ordinary citizens might vary depending on party identification. Using the data from the American National Election Studies (ANES, 1972-2012), I estimate ordinary least squares (OLS) and logistic regression models to test the relationship between party identification and cross-pressure, and the relationship between cross-pressure and voter turnout. Preliminary findings include that Republican identifiers in 2004 and 2008 were more cross-pressured than Democratic identifiers, whereas in 1972, there was no clear partisan difference, and that the cross-pressured members of the public were less likely to vote in 2008, whereas in 1972 and 2004 the effect of cross-pressure on voter turnout was not statistically significant. I contribute to the field by demonstrating that the nature, and the consequence, of cross-pressure experienced by the public are more complex than previously believed: The partisan difference in cross-pressure and the effect of cross-pressure on voter turnout exist in some periods, but not in others. I conclude by discussing the implications of the empirical findings for representation in the United States.

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