Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 1,036 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 208 - Next  Jump:
2012 - AECT International Convention Words: 71 words || 
Info
1. Wang, Chun-Min (Arthur). "Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultural Online Collaboration: The Perspectives from Taiwanese College Students Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultural Online Collaboration: The Perspectives from Taiwanese College Students Using VoiceThread for Cross-cultura" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AECT International Convention, The Galt House, Louisville, KY, Oct 30, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574479_index.html>
Publication Type: Concurrent Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study, a Web 2.0 tool called VoiceThread was applied into a cross-cultural collaboration project between the college students from the United States and Taiwan. By analyzing Taiwanese students’ reflection essays and the questionnaire regarding the overall learning experience, the study intends to identify important elements of designing and developing cross-cultural online learning environment, and also suggests how to better use VoiceThread in cross-cultural projects for teaching and learning purpose.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 44 pages || Words: 11342 words || 
Info
2. Niv-Solomon, Anat., Janik, Laura., Hudson, Natalie., Boyer, Mark. and Brown, Scott. "Talking Security: A Cross-Cultural, Cross-Generational Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180090_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Security is a hot button issue almost anywhere in the world, but when people discuss security do they all understand the issue the same way? Conceptions of security have changed over the past several decades and continue to evolve all the time. But the changing security discourse also highlights the notion that security, or at least the ways that each of us perceive it, is a construct of our socialization processes and the security environment in which we live. Individuals in war-torn regions are more likely to list physical safety as a higher priority than economic prosperity. Those in developing societies are more likely to emphasize basic human needs; and citizens of developed countries may emphasize ?luxury? conceptions of security, such as economic prosperity, in their own views of what is important for feeling secure. In all instances, people?s perceptions of security are conditioned by the physical, social, economic, and even emotional setting of the world around them. This paper focuses on understanding whether or not the evolving security discourse in our field reflects the reality of security perceptions held by people. We begin by briefly reviewing some of the scholarly literature on evolving conceptions of security and then turn to an examination of conceptions of security held by today?s youth (and tomorrow?s leaders) in two countries, the USA and Israel using data generated by the GlobalEd Project (www.globaled.uconn.edu) at the University of Connecticut. We then compare the younger generation?s attitudes with the attitudes held by their parents? generation allowing an additional layer of analysis.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 9188 words || 
Info
3. Nguyen, Duyen. and Fussell, Susan. "The Effects of Cognitive and Affective Processes on Message Content in Same-Culture and Cross-Culture Instant Messaging Conversations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p637218_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, we examine how cognitive and affective processes shape message production in intercultural Instant Messaging conversations. We employed a retrospective analysis technique in our experiments to measure cognitive and affective responses of the participants at specific time intervals during the conversations. A series of regression analyses showed that self-reported cognitive and affective states predicted the content of a participant’s subsequent messages. Furthermore, the cultural composition of the pairs influenced the relationships between cognitive and affective processes and message production. Our results contribute to theories of intercultural computer mediated communication and inform the design of global collaboration tools.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 41 pages || Words: 7778 words || 
Info
4. Senokozlieva, Maria., Fischer, Oliver., Bente, Gary. and Krämer, Nicole. "Of Frames and Cultures: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of TV Newscasts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p92149_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: TV news are essentially cultural phenomena. Previous research suggests that the often-overlooked formal and implicit characteristics of newscasts may be systematically related to culture-specific characteristics. Investigating these characteristics by means of a frame-by-frame content analysis is identified as a particularly promising methodological approach. To examine the relationship between culture and selected formal characteristics of newscasts, we present a study that compares material from the USA, the Arab world, and Germany. Results indicate that there are many significant differences, some of which are in line with underlying dimensions of culture. Specifically, we argue that the number of people presented as well as the context in which they are presented can be interpreted as an indicator of collectivism. The drawn conclusions underline the validity of the chosen methodological approach, but also demonstrate the need for more comprehensive and theory-driven category schemes.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 208 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy