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2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 12216 words || 
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1. Tessin, Jeff. "Cues Given, Cues Received: How Candidates Use Shortcuts When Voters Need Them Most" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p141132_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While extensive research exists on how voters use cues and heuristics, relatively little work exists on how candidates create cues to shape voter opinion. This paper develops a general theory of cue-giving, in which candidates use cues to make their appeals more salient to voters who are disengaged and distracted by many other media messages. The paper shows that House candidates provide more cues in their television advertising when they face scarce campaign resources, crowded communication environments, and politically unsophisticated electorates---precisely the conditions in which voters need cues the most. Thus candidates and voters alike use cues to communicate in a media environment that demands brevity and salience.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 39 pages || Words: 10301 words || 
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2. Boudreau, Cheryl. "Are Two Cues Better Than One? An Analysis of When Multiple Cues Improve Decisions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361242_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It is widely known that citizens use cues as substitutes for knowledge about politics. Given the many cues that exist in the real world, it is important to study the effects of cues when there is more than one available to citizens. Thus, I conduct laboratory experiments in which I provide subjects with several different cues, and I assess whether multiple cues help subjects to improve their decisions, above and beyond the improvements they achieve when only one of these cues is present. My results show that two cues are not necessarily better than one. That is, when one cue enables subjects to achieve large improvements in their decisions, the presence of a second cue does not allow subjects to improve their decisions further. However, the addition of a second cue can induce further improvements in subjects’ decisions, even when that cue, by itself, does not improve subjects’ decisions and even when it is paired with another cue that, by itself, also does not improve subjects’ decisions. Thus, even when two cues do not improve subjects’ decisions when presented separately, they significantly improve subjects’ decisions when they are presented together.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 7709 words || 
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3. Keib, Kate. and Wojdynski, Bartosz. "Fake News, Real Cues: Cues and Heuristics in Users’ Online News Credibility Judgments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1281709_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Two experimental studies sought to identify cues and heuristics used by consumers to assess online news content from an unknown source, and what influence these factors have on credibility assessments. Results show that on-page design cues including writing style, pictures and advertisements influence credibility assessments, and these cues do garner attention and influence such assessments. Practitioners can use on-page cues to build credibility among customers. The cues and heuristics identified warrant future research by scholars.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 198 words || 
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4. Morisi, Davide., Colombo, Celine., De Angelis, Andrea. and Kriesi, Hanspeter. "Taking cues from the Government? The effect of heuristic cues versus policy arguments in the Italian constitutional referendum" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1245802_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the main criticisms of direct democracy is that it places excessively demanding choices on voters. Are citizens “competent enough” to vote directly on policy issues? When issues at stake are high, do citizens mainly follow elites’ signals or do they decide in line with their issue preferences? In this study we address these questions in relation to the 2016 Italian constitutional referendum. This referendum represents an ideal case to test different strategies of decision-making in direct democracy, since the proposed constitutional reform entailed complex legal changes, while at the same time affecting the fate of the government. The analysis relies on a unique panel survey with a representative sample of voters. The second wave of the panel includes an embedded survey-experiment that was carried out around one month before the referendum. This design allows to test the extent to which Italian voters made their voting decisions based on heuristic processing – such as following Government cues – and/or systematic processing – i.e. processing based on issue preferences and policy arguments. The study brings an innovative contribution to dual-process theory in real decision-making environments, in addition to contributing to the debate on citizens’ competence in direct democracy.

2018 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Hoplamazian, Gregory. "Heterosexual Consumer Responses to Gay Cues in Advertising: The Impact of Brand-Related Cues on Advertising Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Westgate Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 07, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1373231_index.html>
Publication Type: General Paper Submission
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The spending power of the LGBT market is estimated at over $800 billion dollars, but gay and lesbian characters remain largely absent from mainstream advertising. This occurs in large part because of a fear of backlash from heterosexual consumers, who marketers fear may abandon brands featuring gay models or cues. However a growing body of research shows that gay cues in advertising do not necessarily lead to lower ad effectiveness for heterosexual consumers, with this null effect most pronounced for women. The present study builds on previous research to identify how viewers respond to gay cultural cues when same-sex or opposite sex model pairs are present. A between-subjects experiment is used to test whether brands that signal LGBT inclusiveness in their advertising can expect more favorable ad responses from viewers, and whether these cues makes heterosexuals feel more or less targeted by advertisers. Finally, a moderated mediation model is proposed to help identify the process through which gay cues impact advertising outcomes.

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