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2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 100 words || 
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1. Price, Cecelia. "Employing Culturally Responsive Teaching and Rhetoric of Cultural Production: Transforming School Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p732187_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Employing Culturally Responsive Teaching and Rhetoric of Cultural Production: Transforming School Culture
Cecelia J. Price,
Teacher Education and Administration
University of North Texas

This paper addresses apathetic school culture and attends to the question: How might Rhetoric of Cultural Production (RCP) (Gaztambide-Fernandez, 2013) and Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) (Geneva Gay, 2002; 2010) combine to transform culture? I define “culture”, present complexities associated with its transformation and establish its connection to productivity. I offer RCP and CRT through a phenomenological lens and as foundations for reform. I illustrate how RCP/CRT positions leaders to change culture using Nightline’s report on a violent Philadelphia high school.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Carrington, Ben. "The Two Cultures of Culture: Stuart Hall’s missing legacy from American cultural sociology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1122405_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On February 10th 2014, Stuart Hall passed away. Hall was one of the world’s leading cultural theorists. But Hall’s groundbreaking sociological approach remains directly at odds with what passes for sociological inquiry as practiced by many American sociologists. Taking its title from C.P. Snow’s famous lecture on the “The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution”, this paper, (i) traces the “two cultures” of sociological work on culture, the British Cultural Studies and American sociology of culture traditions, exploring how the object of inquiry has come to be framed in such diametrically opposed ways by each, (ii) I specifically compare and contrast the approaches and distinctive contributions of Hall and Patterson, using Patterson’s recent edited collection “Cultural Matrix: Understanding Black Youth” and Hall’s earlier texts “Resistance Through Rituals: Youth Subcultures in Post-War Britain” and “Policing the Crisis: Mugging, the State, and Law and Order” to help highlight and exemplify the different ways of understanding culture, identity, meaning and the role of the state, found within each author’s framework and (iii) I challenge recent arguments concerning the value of a “transdisciplinary” approach to the study of culture that some have argued is a “new” way forward for the study of culture. Instead, I suggest that a less myopic (and ultimately more meaningful and informed) American sociology of culture is possible if the five decades worth of intellectual contributions from sociologists such as Hall, and others, are acknowledged and taken more seriously by American sociology of culture scholars.

2004 - International Studies Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 15436 words || 
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3. Valbjorn, Morten. "Culture and IR – Culture in IR; Ignoring, introducing, up-dating or forgetting the concept of culture in International Relations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p74105_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper, which is basically an enquiry into the current debate within International Relations (IR) on the (ir)relevance of culture, reveals how neither the discipline nor international relations as such seem to be as ‘culture blank’ as often claimed, and how the position taken in this debate might have far-reaching implica-tions for the image of international relations. Furthermore, the paper explores how an essentially contested concept like ‘culture’ is fraught with pitfalls. Thus, two main alternative ‘cultural’ approaches seem to have replaced the usual neglect of cultural diversity, resulting in a likewise problematic exaggerated focus on this theme, so that instead of being ‘blind to culture’ like large parts of mainstream IR, these new approaches rather appear to be ‘blinded by culture’. Proponents of the so-called ‘essentialist’ approach to culture appear blinded by a conception of the absolute cultural difference of ‘the Other’, while subscribers to the so-called ‘relational approach’ seem blinded by too much awareness of their own culturally specific perspective. So, even though the recent ‘cultural turn’ within IR has brought a new and welcome awareness of culture and sensitivity to issues of cultural diversity and the representation of Otherness, it seems as if the advocates of a ‘culturalisation’ of IR have until now been better at raising important and too-long-neglected questions, than at offering attractive answers to these. At the end of the paper, I therefore outline a number of alternative and (partly intersecting) avenues to proceed at, arguing that it may be wise even to forget the concept of culture for a while, if we want to continue along the road towards a better understanding of what sensitivity to cultural diversity might mean.

2007 - Association for the Study of African American Life and History Words: 246 words || 
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4. Jenkins, Toby. "Calling Culture: Changing Paradigms of the Presence, Importance, and Definitions of African American Culture and Cultural Efficacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Atlanta Hilton, Charlotte, NC, Oct 03, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p206549_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: This session shares the results of a qualitative study that examined how African American college age students describe their culture and why culture might be important to them. Grounded in the narrative tradition of storytelling, this study synthesizes themes from interviews and personal stories in the form of cultural self portraits. These self portraits are personal narratives of culture focused on cultural ideologies, histories, and experiences that influence the contemporary perception of culture among young African American adults. These contemporary ideas are then compared against a historical examination of African American culture beginning with enslavement in America to shed light on how culture has or has not been inherited, passed on, and kept alive in a contemporary world. Can our young people articulate their culture? Do they value it? Has race completely replaced culture? This sense of ongoing and growing cultural efficacy can be understood by considering iculture to be a flame ignited years ago in indigenous lands by our ancestors. Our acts of cultural engagement serve as elements to keep the flame going and growing [wood, charcoal, bark in the form of ritual, story, tradition]. And the fire—the culture itself—is the source that warms the chilliest of climates and energizes generations of people of color to live, survive, and thrive. The viability for cultural education programs to contribute to the needed growth in cultural efficacy among African American students offers cultural practitioners an important opportunity to gain more information and establish more intentional cultural practice.

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