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2009 - North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Pages: 1 pages || Words: 514 words || 
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1. Behm Cross, Stephanie. "Project-based Curriculum: Two Teachers' Use of Standards-based Mathematics Curriculum Materials from an Enactment Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, OMNI Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Sep 23, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p370024_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This poster highlights two teachers’ curriculum development process as they created and enacted project-based curriculum for math instruction. Different from typical studies focused on the use of Standards-based mathematics curriculum materials, this study presents findings from a curriculum enactment perspective. Pictures, project files, and sample student work presented.

2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 705 words || 
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2. CHU, AIJING. "Between Curriculum Regulation and Autonomy: An Analysis of the Three Levels of Curriculum System in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., Mar 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p989912_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Introduction

The Chinese curriculum policy has been rooted in a highly centralized tradition, which remained unchallenged until the late 1990s. With the arrival of knowledge economy, a serial of educational initiatives have been launched by the Chinese government as powerful responses to meet the ever-changing world. Started with a large-scale investigation and diagnosis of the issues and problems facing basic education in 1997, the Chinese government published the “21st Century Education revitalizing Action Plan” in 1999. Two years later, “Guidelines for Basic Education Curriculum Reform”, which is widely referred to as new curriculum policy, was formally declared by the Ministry of Education of China. After 30 experimental areas of the new curriculum reform were first conducted in 2001, it was implemented across the nation in 2005.
The fundamental goal of the new curriculum reform is to transform its traditional curriculum stereotype, which is characterized as outdated curriculum content and passive learning, to a modernized curriculum system to improve and enhance its educational quality. To achieve this goal, one of the major strategies the new curriculum policy adopted is to introduce the three levels of curriculum systems, that is, national curriculum, local curriculum and school-based curriculum.

Research Questions

Against the background of a rooted tradition of strict curriculum regulation in China, this study attempts to explore the extent to which Chinese schools are becoming strong curriculum agencies with the ten-year’s implementation of the new curriculum policy. Specifically, two major questions are going to be answered: first, what are the governance models of the three levels of curriculum system in China; second, how the three-levels of curriculum system—national curriculum, local curriculum and school-based curriculum are being interpreted and implemented at school level. In addition to analyzing the major policy documents, a key high school in Shandong province of China will be selected as a case study to collect the data.

The Conceptual Frameworks

First, this study uses the curriculum steering models (Kuiper& Nieveen, 2013) to examine the governance models of the three levels of curriculum system in China. Based on the four political steering models developed by Ekholm (1996), Kuiper and Nieveen deduce that there should be four types of curriculum governance models (p. 145): The implementation model (I), in which the government prescribes both the aims and how to reach the aims, and therefore can be characterized as curriculum regulation at the input and/or output level; The gradual development model (II), in which schools are allowed to set local aims and the government creates conditions and prescribes the way schools need to go about the improvement process; The result-oriented responsibility model (III), in which the government prescribes the aims to be achieved and at the same time allows schools to find their own ways to reach the aims; The professionals modes (IV), also known as curriculum deregulation, in which the government not only stimulates schools to formulate the aims and but also allows schools to find local solutions to reach the aims.

Second, in order to examine how the three levels of curriculum system is being interpreted and implemented at school level, this study employs the curriculum spider’s web as an analysis framework. It was firstly presented by van den Akker in 2003 and later used by Kuiper and Nieveen in 2013 to analyze the curriculum policy in the Netherlands. According to van den Akker, a curriculum usually consist of several or all the following components: the rationale underpinning the curriculum; goals, and objectives; content; teacher role; learning activities; materials and resources for teaching and learning; grouping; time allocation; and assessment modes and criteria.


Figure1: The Curriculum Spider’s Web (van den Akker, 2003)

The Significance of Study

The finding of the study will inform policy makers, academic community, parents, and other stakeholders regarding what is going on at school. It will provide them the information regarding the extent to which the Chinese schools are becoming the curriculum agencies, and how the three levels of curriculum system are being interpreted and implemented at school beyond the rhetoric, which often appear in official reports and policy documents. Knowing how the new curriculum policy is being interpreted and implemented at school level is of significant meanings, for the implementation of the curriculum at school is closely connected with educational quality.

2016 - Association of Teacher Educators Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Crawford, Caroline. and Fleres, Carol. "Rethinking Curriculum for the 21st Century Learner: Effective Frequency Curriculum Design" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators Annual Meeting, Chicago Hilton, Chicago, IL, Feb 11, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1046337_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Understanding the curricular design shifts inherent within the Digital Age integration of instructionally relevant technology embraces the need towards considering curricular design as a social/cognitive-constructivist approach to learning.

2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 133 words || 
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4. Rosiek, Jerry. "Critical Race Theory, Agential Realism, and Curriculum Studies: Lessons from Studying Resegregation as Hidden Curriculum" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1112635_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since its introduction to the field of educational research in the mid 1990’s, critical race theory (CRT) has become a major influence on research that examines racial oppression in schools. There are concerns, however, that in the move from legal studies to social scientific research on education, CRT’s critique of neutrality and objectivity might become domesticated and stripped of its politically provocative force. This paper examines the promise of agential realist ontologies (found in new materialist philosophy of science, indigenous philosophy, and revisionist pragmatist philosophy) for putting critical race theory’s racial realism to work in the social sciences without surrendering its more transformative agendas. The paper draws on a ten year study of the way the racial resegregation of a school district functioned like a hidden curriculum to illustrate this promise.

2017 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Davis, Edith. and Byrd, Marie. "Hilda Taba Spiral Curriculum: Micro-Spiral Curriculum for Minorities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Orlando Caribe Royale, Orlando, Florida, Feb 10, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1164105_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Reports
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The science curricula in the nation’s middle schools have been considered one of the weaker links to the advancement of a scientifically literate society. Science education and scientific literacy are essential to the success of the nation. A scientifically literate nation can help assure a free and democratic society, an economically viable society, and a healthy society

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