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2008 - The Law and Society Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 7271 words || 
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1. Poier, Salvatore. "Placing Space in Cyberspace: Consequences of Drawing Private Property in Cyberspace--An Italian Experience" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235708_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Even if the term “cyberspace” is nowadays unquestioned, the use is not a innocent one.
“Cyberspace”, in fact, implies the notion of “space” where there is not a physical spatiality. That choice stresses that a battle about property (in the Romanist sense of the term) was also going on in the Internet.
My paper will tell the story of a privatization of a public space, and it is grounded on the assumption that private property produces more surplus for the owner than public land, and this feature pushes people to set up private properties instead of commons. Similarly, the space metaphor in cyberspace sped up during the late 1980s and first 1990s, i.e. when it was evident to everyone that the Internet was becoming the new Promise Land of economy.
At the very same time, and as a legitimization of privatization of the public Internet, hackers’ phenomenon increased and media depicted them as dangerous.
While hackers are nowadays various and heterogeneous, the main argument that drives their claims is the freedom of the Internet. This argument is often used and abused by different political parties, with the result of a paradoxical enclosure instead of an opening of hackers’ groups. This paper will explore this problem through the participant observation to a Hacker Meeting held in Pisa (Italy) from September 28th to 30th, 2007.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 6068 words || 
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2. Shin, Hochang. "How an Issue in Cyberspace Shifts to the Real World: Three-Stage Cyber-Issue Diffusion (CID) Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14380_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study identifies the characteristics of communication in cyberspace, in particular, how an issue is formed, diffused and amplified to the extent that it arouses collective action in the off-line world. The degree of influence was tested by ten media types and by three issue stages. Qualifications of how an issue shifted from being a cyber issue to off-line action was suggested and tested. In particular, a Three-Stage Cyber-Issue Diffusion (CID) Model was proposed that identifies an issue cycle in cyberspace as a forming stage, a diffusion stage and an action stage. Through factor analysis, the type of media was categorized into three groups such as off-line mass media group, individual media group and Internet homepage group.

2004 - International Studies Association Words: 139 words || 
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3. Taubman, Geoffry. "Legitimacy and Varied Societal Access to Cyberspace in Non-Democracies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Le Centre Sheraton Hotel, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Mar 17, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72696_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Non-democratic regimes—whose rule depends upon the quashing of dissent and the control of information—are acutely concerned about unfettered societal access to the World Wide Web and email. The Internet provides users with powerful means to come into contact with an expansive range of ideologies and data and to disseminate and discuss those findings. Almost without exception, non-democratic rulers have initiated rigorous efforts to counteract the ideational consequences of this new medium but they have not acted in a uniform fashion. Differences in their legitimation strategies—particularly whether they rely upon economic or ideological measures—account for variations in the willingness of non-democratic rulers to allow the public to access cyberspace and utilize the Internet's considerable information-gathering and communication capabilities. The dissimilar Internet strategies employed by China, Cuba and Saudi Arabia will be compared and contrasted.

2007 - Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 56 pages || Words: 13574 words || 
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4. Parkin, Michael. "Campaigns in Cyberspace and the Impact of Presentation Technology on Website Visitors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL, Apr 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p199095_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores how congressional candidates use the web to present information, the motivations that drive their presentation strategies, and the effect that various presentation technologies (i.e., graphics, pictures, audio, and video) have on those who visit candidate websites. Content analysis results from 2002, 2004, and 2006 confirm that fairly simple presentation features are ubiquitous across a broad sample of congressional candidates’ websites although more advanced technologies have developed gradually. Further analysis shows that the decision to include advanced multimedia is driven not only by practical concerns, like time and resources, but also by political considerations such as race competitiveness. To test the effect that presentation strategies have on website visitors, I conducted an experiment with a 2006 U.S. Senate candidate. The results of this experiment show that sophisticated presentation strategies can, in fact, help campaigns in a number of important ways – they can increase voters’ support for the candidate, focus the attention of likely voters on key campaign issues, and slightly boost knowledge of the candidate’s background and policy positions for those most engaged with the campaign. Taken together, this study demonstrates that candidates are motivated to use presentation technologies, at least in part, by strategic political concerns (i.e., race competitiveness) and that these concerns are largely addressed as evidenced by the positive outcomes reported in the experiment.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 31 words || 
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5. Taylor, Matthew. "Candidate Control in Cyberspace: Using the News Media on Campaign Websites." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p136999_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examines articles that appeared in the news sections of websites belonging to three different candidates (a Republican, a Democrat, and an Independent) during the 2005 gubernatorial campaign in Virginia.

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