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2011 - 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 148 words || 
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1. Oware, Matthew. "Decent Daddy, Imperfect Daddy: Black Male Rap Artists’ Views of Fatherhood and the Family" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 35th Annual National Council for Black Studies, The Westin, Cincinnati, OH, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493023_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research examining contemporary African-American male fathers has either presented them as being absent and uninvolved in their children’s lives (Moynihan 1965; Anderson 1990) or engaged with their children—despite structural or institutional constraints they face (Edin, Tach, Mincy 2009; Reynolds 2009). Scant scholarship explores the medium that provides black males their own voices—rap music—in regards to their beliefs about the family. This exploratory research examines how black male rappers talk about motherhood, fatherhood, and parenthood. The content analysis of 391 of rap songs from the years 2004 to 2009 revealed that male rappers expressed unwavering love for their mothers, but contempt for the mothers of their children. Furthermore, they conveyed mixed feelings about their own fathers, but actively embraced fatherhood. Thus, many artists partially adhere to Anderson’s (1990) notion of the “decent daddy,” but are “imperfect” because of the fractious relationships with the biological mother of their children.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 114 words || 
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2. Luster, Patrick. "'Daddy Number One versus Daddy Number Two': Exploring the Millennial Coach’s Relationship to a Mentor Coach, While Dealing with Students as a System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p423964_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Research was conducted at last year’s NCA conference dealing with millennial students. This spawned the idea that millennial coaches also face a few curveballs as they make the transition from student to coach. This paper will deal with the specific relationship that coaches have with their mentors. In my case, my relationship as ADOF with the DOF at my institution. While not all millennials have this type of relationship, I will examine how mentors, or those who serve in a supervisory role over the millennial coach, mold and shape today’s millennial coach. Also, this paper will examine the student perspective and how students handle the relationship between two coaches, the millennial and the mentor/supervisor.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 257 words || 
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3. Mello, W. Bradford. "Are you my Daddy? Exploring generational definitions of ‘Daddy’" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p423214_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Imagine my surprise when a young man, I’m guessing at least twenty years younger than me, approached me in a bar and said, “You’re one hot daddy.” The attention was certainly not unwelcome but I had no firm idea of what exactly the term “daddy” meant in this context. It seemed like it was a good thing to be at the moment in his eyes, but “daddy” to me brought up images of “Father Knows Best”, in other words – old. At 47, I’m certainly old enough to be a daddy, in the biological sense, though I am not. However, the man who approached me in the bar meant something else. Dad, daddy, father, pop, pops: there are many terms for father figures but the gay male community has appropriated the term “daddy” to communicate other information and perhaps desires. Following a qualitative narrative approach, this paper investigates the various nuances behind the term “daddy” as used in the gay male community. Using a purposeful sampling of gay men to interview who either refer to themselves as “daddy” or gay men who seek the companionship of someone they would consider a “daddy,” this paper will provide insight into the definition of term. Traditional conceptions of what it means to be a dad, such as an assumed age difference and an ‘older and wiser’ moniker are pertinent, but ultimately, it might be the case that age is not the key factor in what qualifies someone to earn the ‘daddy’ label.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 103 words || 
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4. Silverman, Rachel. "Jewish Mom, Butch 'Daddy': A Coalescing of Identities on 'Queer As Folk'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p364910_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Melanie Marcus, one of two lesbians on Queer as Folk, is Jewish. Throughout six seasons, Melanie’s Jewishness emerges via language, rituals, symbols, and this paper suggests, her non-normative gender performance. As the butch partner to a feminine blonde, Melanie’s fashion-sense and ambition, place her as “daddy.” Classic Jewish mother stereotypes of over-bearing and guilt ridden also permeate the text. As the two identities coalesce on Melanie’s body, the masculine tropes of cheap, critical, and physically weaker, are softened. When Sontag’s 1966 work on Camp linked Jews and Gays through their sensibility and aesthetics, is that what she had in mind?

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5312 words || 
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5. Hauser, Orlee. "Pushing Daddy Away? A Qualitative Study on Maternal Gatekeeping" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 20, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p506829_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is a great deal of literature regarding the differences between motherhood and fatherhood. The literature suggests that parenthood is deeply gendered and takes on different meanings for men and for women. While taking a feminist approach, this paper examines parenthood from an angle not typically addressed in feminist discussion. Missing from recent scholarship is any in-depth examination of the role that women may play in limiting the involvement of their male partners. What part do women play in the maintenance of traditional parenting roles? This paper (still in progress), based on a series of interviews with parents of young children as well as field research in child centered locations, concentrates on the reasons behind the emergence of gendered parenting approaches. The qualitative nature of this study makes it possible to note the complexity of this issue and examine the role of both mother and father in gatekeeping. Overall, I argue that many mothers are involved in maternal gatekeeping through taking control over both major and minor parenting decisions, through controlling access to parenting information and through implementing control mechanisms during their absence. I discuss the means by which some mothers attempt to limit their partners’ involvement and the ambivalence that this creates for both parents involved.

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