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Showing 1 through 3 of 3 records.
2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 22 pages || Words: 5675 words || 
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1. Agne, Robert. "Listening Discourse in an Unconventional Crisis Negotiation: The FBI and the Branch Davidians at Waco" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p260208_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper sets up the reasoning, literature review, and theoretical framework for the examination of listening practices in the telephone negotiations between the FBI and the Branch Davidians outside Waco, TX in the early Spring of 1993. Some research has pushed to examine listening and crisis negotiation from a more communication perspective. This study will contribure to that push by examining listening in the Waco negotiations as a metadiscourse - how participants talk about listening and construct the meaning of effective listening. The Waco negotiations as an unconventional and problematic communicative situation makes the study potentially insightful for listening research and how crisis negotiators are trained. See extended abstract.

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 5108 words || 
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2. Van Hoey, Katie. "The Personal Side of Apocalyptic Cults: A Sociological Analysis of Branch Davidians and Heaven's Gate" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107820_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Cults, like the Branch Davidians and Heaven’s Gate, have typically been viewed as the creation of a deviant and egotistical individual. Using brainwashing and reprogramming techniques, this individual fashions a mindless collective willing to follow him or her even to the point of death. However, careful analysis of the social and personal factors surrounding the creation of cults, apocalyptic cults in particular, reveals a drastically different picture. These cults are the product of normal human fascination with the end of time molded into extreme apocalyptic groupings and tendencies. With the right blend of lifestyles, worldviews, and human gullibility, these initially harmless religious groups were transformed into the fanatical cults America witnessed at the Waco standoff and in the mass suicide under the passing of the Haley Bopp comet. In essence, these individuals, both leaders and followers, are more the victims of time’s and society’s cruel arrangements, then the whims of an apocalyptic madman.

2013 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 210 words || 
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3. Pitts, William. "Branch Davidian Beginnings: The Thought and Practice of Victor Houteff" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana, Mar 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p639991_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Due to a disastrous confrontation between the U.S. government and the Branch Davidians twenty years ago (April, 1993), the Branch Davidians are one of the most recognizable of American new religious movements. This paper examines the ideas that first shaped the movement. The Davidian and Branch Davidian origins are found in the thought of the Bulgarian immigrant Victor Houteff. After he arrived in the U.S. Houteff converted from his Bulgarian Orthodox faith to the millennial ideas of the Seventh-day Adventist church. But he began to criticize its lax practice and set out to reform the denomination. Rejected by officials of the Seventh-day Adventists, he and sixty followers made their way to Waco, Texas in 1935 with a goal of establishing a true church. Houteff believed in the near return of Christ and led his followers to believe he was "the new Elijah" who would personally announce the return of Christ. Despite the challenges of the depression the community he organized succeeded. Moreover, followers believd in their special mission to convert 144,000 followers. They established a sophisticated publishing and distribution operation to communicate Houteff's message. This paper examines the beliefs and practices of Houteff and shows how he shaped the thought of later Branch Davidian leaders, Ben Roden and David Koresh.


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