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2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 196 words || 
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1. Kakoti, George. "Death Penalty without Imposition of Death? The Tanzanian Experience" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517631_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In countries such as the US, some of the tensions over the Death Penalty revolve around the judiciary applying brakes on the executive and legislature branches’ gusto to increase death-eligible offenses and expedite state executions. Tanzania lacks similar battles over law and order policy, particularly as it applies to the Death Penalty. Surprisingly however, despite having Death Penalty statutes on its books since colonial times, and the practice of never announcing executions, this sanction has been imposed very sparingly. Nor are there documented extralegal executions by law enforcement organs, as has happened elsewhere. This is rare in the African experience, particularly since Tanzania’s highest court, despite calling the Death Penalty “inhumane and degrading”, has rejected challenges to its constitutionality. The executive branch, which must confirm all state executions, has been leery of imposing it, even long before the rise of the global movement for abolition of the Death Penalty. This paper examines Tanzanian’s Death Penalty regime, discusses the single major court challenge to this sanction, and offers possible explanations for the ambivalence by successive Presidents, who while refusing to abolish the penalty, are believed to have commuted all death sentences for decades now.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 209 words || 
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2. Knapp, Matthew. ""Until Death Do Us Part”: The Impact of the Death Penalty on Families of the Condemned" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, <Not Available>. 2019-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p200215_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: PRESENTER: Matthew A. Knapp, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Alabama


Background: Issues surrounding the death penalty in the United States have been well debated in the past 40 years, most of which have focused on the moral, legal, and ethical implications of enactment and implementation. One issue regarding the death penalty that has not been well examined is the mental health effects and impact of the death penalty on the families of the condemned. The popular belief that crime victims and their families are the only "victims" involved in death penalty sentences and outcomes will be critically examined.
Purpose and Method: This paper examines the mental health status and impact of death penalty sentences on families of the condemned by analyzing existing primary and secondary sources (both quantitative and qualitative) on the topic. These sources will include, but not be limited to, The Innocence Project, Parents of Murdered Children; The Southern Poverty Law Project; Murder Victims Families for Human Rights; and various scholarly journal articles. A more inclusive definition of "victim" will be posited based on literature findings and study outcomes.
Results: Statistical information, reports, and qualitative themes will be presented, discussed, and summarized in terms of the experiences and reported outcomes for this potentially vulnerable group.


Word Count: 197

2015 - The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Words: 255 words || 
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3. Chang, David. "Diasporic Lives and Deaths: Kānaka and American Indians Remember the Deaths of Kānaka in California" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., <Not Available>. 2019-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p987678_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The varying commemorations of the lives and deaths of diasporic Hawaiians in nineteenth-century California reveal the complexities of their lives and identities: both as Kānaka Maoli with deep ties to the Hawaiian nation and as men whose lives had entwined deeply with California Indian communities. By the 1840s, one-third of the Native men of the archipelago were laboring abroad, and the Gold Rush brought hundreds more to California. Many (probably most) of them lived with and among Native Americans. Many diasporic Kānaka never returned home: they died far from their homeland. From the 1850s until the end of the century, commemorative articles in Hawaiian-language newspapers about Kānaka Hawaiʻi who died in diaspora gave Kānaka a means to imagine the enduring bonds linking Kanaka to each other and to their home places—what Kānaka call their ʻone hanau, the sands of their birth. Articles in Hawaiian-language newspapers and stories of remembrance about Kānaka Hawaiʻi who died in diaspora helped make Hawaiian families and communities aware of the fate of the migrants far away and helped to keep the migrants knit into the Hawaiian national community. At the same time, the way these people were commemorated in graveyards and oral narratives by their American Indian family members and descendants makes clear their strong connection to the American Indian communities among whom they lived. Read together, both Hawaiian and Native Californian commemorations played a role in reimagining communities that could be physically far-flung, socially diverse, and tied to Hawaiian and Native Californian communities.

2015 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 98 words || 
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4. Nguyen, Trung. "Sudden Death, Slow Death: Failed Articulations of Normative Southeast Asian Refugee Resettlement Post-1975" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Wisconsin Center, Milwaukee, WI, <Not Available>. 2019-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1025802_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Dominant Southeast Asian refugee resettlement narratives deployed by minority nationalists post-1975 have anchored onto normative articulations of death during the Vietnam War to construct a politics whether antagonistic to or in collusion with the US extensions of empire. However, these articulations circulate ambivalently around on-going conditions producing precarity that refugee subjects uneasily inhabit post-resettlement. I focus on two stories of gendered and sexualized precarity which confound or fail to find legibility within normative articulations of death: cases of “sudden unexpected death syndrome” of Southeast Asian men and my experiences filming a documentary on my sister’s struggle with schizophrenia.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Clark, Stephanie. "On Death, Dying, and Emotional Labor: A Social Psychological Analysis of Nursing and Patient Death" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1251604_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract
Background: Nurses perform a wide range of duties and their expertise and skills are expected to be malleable across a spectrum of situations, and include medication and dosing, anatomy and physiology as well interacting with patients and colleagues. Although not emphasized in nursing school, nurses also must cope with patient death and the dying process. Academic research on the impact of patient death on healthcare professionals has flourished recently, but few studies have incorporated social psychological frames to this topic.
Objective: Summarize how nurses cope with patient death and dying and incorporate social psychological concepts into this area of interest, specifically, gender inequality, emotional labor and socialization.
Design: Systematic review methods were employed.
Methods: A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted in Web of Science and PubMed. All relevant qualitative and quantitative studies were included.
Results: While there has been a resurgence of research on socialization in medical sociology and a substantial number of publications on medical professional’s experiences with death and dying in the past decade, there are multiple gaps in the literature that future researchers should take into consideration. Notably, almost none of these studies explicitly used a social psychological frame or incorporated social physiological concepts or theories into their research

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