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2006 - International Studies Association Words: 294 words || 
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1. Omelicheva, Mariya. "There?s No Debate about Using Debates! Instructional and Assessment Functions of Debates in International Studies Curriculum" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p100716_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Most political science educators agree that the preparation of literate and interested citizens is an important teaching and learning objective. The syllabi of political science courses describe the goals of developing higher order cognitive skills, fostering intellectual and moral growth, and instilling affective values, such as intellectual empathy, fair-mindedness, tolerance, and fascination with the subject.There is often a mismatch between the objectives of curricula, on the one side, and activities and assessment tools utilized for the attainment of goals, on the other. Lectures as an instructional tool, and tests, quizzes, and papers as tools of students? evaluation remain the predominant mode of teaching and gauging the learning outcomes. Classroom debates are an excellent teaching and learning strategy aligned with the goals of development of critical thinking and intellectual independence. In addition, debates offer excellent performance assessment opportunities for both instructors and students. Despite many virtues and simplicity in use, debates have not been frequently used in political science courses, in general, or international relations courses, in particular.In my essay, I advocate the use of classroom debates as superior tools of learning, instruction, and evaluation for teaching about different areas of international relations or world politics. The discussion of debates is grounded in psychological theories that explicate how the features of debates can promote abstract thinking, engagement in learning, citizenship and etiquette, clarity, organization, persuasion, public speaking, research, and teamwork and cooperation. I emphasize the evaluative purposes of debates and discuss how they can be used to measure students? achievement, diagnose learning problems, assess the entire instruction process, and even determine student attitudes toward the content of the course and the quality of the instruction. The essay includes concrete examples of classroom debates accompanied by recommendations on debate preparation, presentation, evaluation, and sources for debates.

2005 - APSA Teaching and Learning Conference Pages: 40 pages || Words: 11616 words || 
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2. Omelicheva, Mariya. "There’s No Debate about the Use of Debates! Instructional and Assessment Functions of Debates in Political Science Curricula" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Teaching and Learning Conference, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p11564_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Most political science educators agree that the preparation of literate citizens able and willing to engage in democratic practices is an important teaching and learning objective. The syllabi of political science courses describe the goals of developing higher order cognitive skills, fostering intellectual and moral growth, and instilling affective values, such as intellectual empathy, fair-mindedness, tolerance, and fascination with the subject.
There is often a mismatch between the objectives of curricula, on the one side, and activities and assessment tools utilized for the attainment of goals, on the other. Lectures as an instructional tool, and tests, quizzes, and papers as tools of students’ evaluation remain the predominant mode of teaching and gauging the learning outcomes. Classroom debates are an excellent teaching and learning strategy aligned with the goals of development of critical thinking and intellectual independence. In addition, debates offer excellent performance assessment opportunities for both instructors and students. Despite many virtues and simplicity in use, debates have not been frequently used in political science courses.
In my essay, I advocate the use of classroom debates as superior tools of learning, instruction, and evaluation. The discussion of debates is grounded in psychological theories that explicate how the features of debates can promote abstract thinking, engagement in learning, citizenship and etiquette, clarity, organization, persuasion, public speaking, research, and teamwork and cooperation. I emphasize the evaluative purposes of debates and discuss how they can be used to measure students’ achievement, diagnose learning problems, assess the entire instruction process, and even determine student attitudes toward the content of the course and the quality of the instruction.
The essay includes concrete examples of classroom debates accompanied by recommendations on debate preparation, presentation, evaluation, and sources for debates.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 71 words || 
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3. Foote, Justin. and Denryter, Andrew. "Jumping in the Deep End of the Debate Pool: Graduate Students Coaching an NDT Team With No Debate Experience" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p366610_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While most first year Teaching Assistants have apprehensions and excitement about teaching for the first time, being a first year Coaching Assistant for a nationally recognized NDT debate program with no high school or college experience can be a daunting and intimidating experience. The paper will address the learning curve associated with the experience as well as advice for other coaches in similar situations and for DOFs mentoring such situations.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 8252 words || 
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4. Maurer, Marcus. and Reinemann, Carsten. "Televised debates and the public interest. Dysfunctional effects of televised debates on voters' knowledge of the state of the country" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112876_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Televised debates are supposed to provide voters with political information that helps them to decide on a rational basis whom to vote for. Many studies have shown that voters do in fact learn from what is said during debates, e.g. about the positions advocated or the importance of political issues. Therefore, many researchers regard televised debates a useful feature of political campaign communication. What is not investigated in these studies, however, is the extent to which televised debates actually enhance voters' knowledge. We argue in this paper that a differentiation between learning effects (e.g. being able to repeat candidates' descriptions of the state of the country) and knowledge effects (improving understanding of the state of the country) is necessary because what people learn in televised debates might not necessarily leave them with a better basis for a rational voting decision.

In order to investigate that, we surveyed a sample of 75 voters immediately before, during, immediately after and five days after the second televised debate before the 2002 German national election. During the debate, viewers' reactions were measured using a real-time response measurement system (RTR). In the surveys, participants were asked to assess Germany's economic situation as compared to (a) the situation before the last national election in 1998 and (b) to other European countries. Our analysis shows substantial learning effects among viewers. But that does not mean that they improved their knowledge. In fact, knowledge about unemployment was actually worse after the debate among a substantial number of viewers. They were obviously misled by the candidates' selective presentation of facts. This means that televised debates sometimes can even reduce the knowledge of voters.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 35 pages || Words: 8559 words || 
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5. Fridkin, Kim., Kenney, Patrick., Gershon, Sarah. and Woodall, Gina. "Spinning Debates: The Impact of the News Media's Framing of the Final 2004 Presidential Debate" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p137035_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We examined the impact of media coverage of the 3rd presidential debate on candidate evaluations, and found that the debate led viewers to become more favorable towards John Kerry, while media coverage increasedfavorability towards President Bush.

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