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2012 - Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 245 words || 
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1. Greer, Scott. "Debt, decentralization, and distribution: Decentralized welfare states, health policy, and fiscal crisis in the European Union" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p549919_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The welfare state in much of Europe is regional and local, but retrenchment, responsibility and high-profile action happen in state capitals. This paper explores the unexpected conseqeuences of retrenchment in decentralized states. Fiscal crisis and budget cutbacks across much of the continent, in a time of increased social need, are highlighting unexpected distributive consequences of established institutional structures and scope for new analysis of what the interaction of decentralized political institutions and fiscal crisis do to the distributive consequences of the welfare state. This paper combines an overview of decentralized states’ health policies since the start of the crisis with deeper case studies of two states that have decentralized their welfare expenditure to regional governments and then been hit hard: the United Kingdom and Spain. Both states developed their welfare states in comparatively good times and are adopting stringent retrenchment pressures justified by pressure from markets, fellow EU states, and international organizations. Spain bears the added burden of the Eurozone and its monetary policies. Analysis of the two cases shows how the specific forms of retrenchment are shaped by territorial politics and how decentralized institutions mediate their effects and produce new political and social pressures. It also shows gaps in existing literatures on fiscal policy and retrenchment, which fail to bring European politics and political economy into discussions of territorial politics, and fail to appreciate the complexities of multi-level governance in understanding how states and welfare states reform and distribute the costs of policy change.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 14711 words || 
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2. Kerlin, Janelle. "The Political Means and Social Service Ends of Decentralization in Poland" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65389_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper analyzes the politics and social service outcomes of the second round of decentralization in Poland. Poland's 1999 public administration reform reduced the number of provinces from 49 to 16, restored 373 counties, and decentralized public programs and services to these two levels. In the process it dramatically altered many programs in social services previously administered on higher levels including residential nursing homes, orphanages, adoption services, rehabilitation centers, and services for the disabled. It also provided the potential for increased citizen participation in social service programming. While the reform intended to improve services and participation, outcomes in these areas for social service delivery often failed to meet these goals. Many of these unsatisfactory outcomes can be traced back to the politics of reform development. Conflicting ideologies and pressures on policy actors stemming from a variety of historical, institutional, political and international sources resulted in compromises that caused unfavorable public service outcomes. Most significant for immediate outcomes was the tension between neoliberal and neotraditional ideologies espoused by reformers. This paper addresses a gap in decentralization studies by connecting the politics of decentralization with specific outcomes for public services on subnational levels of government.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 13928 words || 
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3. Ewig, Christina. "The Contributions of Community Based Decentralization to Democracy: Peru's Local Health Administration Committees" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p63956_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper I test the claims that government decentralization can strengthen democracy by considering one form of decentralization: the decentralization of health service administration to community boards. Based on comparison of four poor communities in Peru, two of which experienced community-based decentralization of health service administration, and two similar communities that did not, I evaluate whether or not community-based decentralization initiatives do indeed promote or strengthen social capital and local democratic practices.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 6644 words || 
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4. O'Dwyer, Conor. and Ziblatt, Daniel. "Does Decentralization Make Government More Efficient?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p61982_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we use a broad cross-national sample to test decentralization’s relationship with two important indicators of the quality of governance: efficiency and effectiveness. Contrary to much of the conventional wisdom, we find that the effects of decentralization are minimal when controlling for basic structural variables such as per capita GDP and degree of democracy. In addition we find that different types of decentralization—fiscal, administrative, and political—have differing and sometimes opposing impacts on the quality of governance. Finally, we find that political decentralization in particular is associated with higher government efficiency among high GDP per capita countries while it is associated with lower government efficiency among low GDP per capita countries.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 9211 words || 
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5. Coggburn, Jerrell. "The Benefits of Human Resource Centralization? Insights from a Decentralized State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p64808_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Texas is unique among American state governments in its approach to human resources (HR). Specifically, the state has no central HR (or “personnel”) office and no comprehensive set of centrally prescribed HR policies and procedures. Instead, the HR function is almost completely decentralized, giving state agencies considerable latitude in designing and implementing their respective HR programs. Given that contemporary calls for HR reform emphasize decentralization, Texas represents an excellent case study for understanding the practical implications of a decentralized approach to HR. The paper examines findings from a recent (2002) survey of Texas’ state agency HR directors. The HR directors were asked to indicate their level of agreement or disagreement with a series of statements related to HR centralization-decentralization. Generally, results suggest that respondents do not see the putative benefits of a centralized HR model. However, contingency table and regression analyses reveal important relationships between respondents’ demographic characteristics and opinion. Respondents from small state agencies, those who perceive that they do not have requisite HR expertise, and those with lower levels of educational attainment hold significantly different opinions on the benefits of centralized HR.

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