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2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5320 words || 
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1. Platt, Carrie Anne. "A Culture of Thinness: Negotiated and Oppositional Decoding of Eating Disorder Discourse by Anorectics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112798_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Within a popular culture built on inconsistencies, contemporary media present conflicting representations of thinness. Within the cracks of these contradictions, a sub-culture of anorectics has created a reading position for itself outside of the dominant ‘eating disorders as dangerous diseases’ ideology. This sub-culture can be found in the electronic communities of pro eating disorder websites. Referred to as ‘Pro Ana’ or ‘Pro Mia’ sites, messages on these pages encourage harmful behavior by: (1) posting tips on how to avoid eating and/or purge food, (2) describing drugs and ‘home remedies’ for weight loss, (3) instructing users how to hide eating disorders from family and friends, and (4) providing pictures of emaciated models as a form of encouragement. The electronically preserved nature of anorectics’ tertiary texts on pro eating disorder websites affords the cultural critic a profound opportunity for analyzing the decoding strategies of a marginalized group operating outside of the dominant ideology. The current investigation utilizes a combination of Stuart Hall’s theory of encoding/decoding with Michael de Certeau’s theory of subversive bricolage as a theoretical framework for analyzing the tertiary texts present in pro eating disorder websites. This analysis will argue that, through negotiated and oppositional decoding of eating disorder texts, the anorectics participating in pro eating disorder websites systematically de-construct and re-construct discourse to serve their own ends.

2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7492 words || 
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2. Varma, Anita. "The Ironic Incongruity of Canonical Common Sense in Critical Communication: The Case of Stuart Hall’s “Encoding, Decoding” Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p636350_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Critical studies seek to expose and challenge common-sense frameworks. When critical models of communication are deployed uncritically and treated as common-sense, however, an ironic incongruity arises. This incongruity has potentially grave consequences for thwarting the critical endeavor of seeking a transformative future that transgresses the status quo. I offer a case study of Stuart Hall’s seminal “Encoding, decoding” model by describing its origins, content, and context, and by analyzing recent applications of it. Using Antonio Gramsci’s concept of common sense and D.C. Muecke’s catalog of ironies to conceptualize what it means to “be critical,” I propose ways that canonic texts might advance the field of critical communication studies rather than stagnating it.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 235 words || 
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3. Schmiedl, Anne. "Uncovering the Hidden: Manipulating Written Characters in Order to Decode Messages from the Spirit World" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1194741_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper explores the medium of writing as a tool to transgress the boundaries between the spirit world and the physical world in Imperial China. Specifically, it concentrates on the divinatory method of manipulating Chinese characters, termed glyphomancy by Joseph Needham, of which we find traces in a wide variety of sources, starting as early as the Han dynasty. In the framework of a correlational worldview, Chinese characters are understood as a device that can be used to unveil connections in the cosmos. Accordingly, a correct interpretation and manipulation of Chinese characters grants practitioners insights into the workings of the world, the possibility to foretell the future, and the potential to understand messages from the spirit world. The cases presented in this paper deal with accounts of literati struggling to interpret these written messages. Ghosts and spirits never clearly communicate their intent; instead, the actual meaning is hidden beneath the surface of seemingly unintelligible statements. Only skilled practitioners of glyphomancy are able to decode these concealed pieces of information. Correct interpretations are always validated at the end of these accounts, and the protagonists are usually rewarded for their efforts. The dead will offer their gratitude for acts of kindness, or will communicate significant information like the name of their murderer, thus enabling the living to rectify moral transgressions. Knowledge of script, therefore, is shown as an important tool in the communication with the spirit world.

2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 117 words || 
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4. Faulkner, Christopher. and Stein, Sarah. "The Zodiac Killer - Decoded?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Feb 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1322115_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation will address designing a process of deciphering the Zodiac killer’s 340- character cipher. Via this decoding process, it is believed that a connection to prior letters and known/unknown information has arisen. Via deductive logic and identifying previous failed attempts by other sources this presentation will introduce a new way of completing this cipher. This presentation will also discuss a revision of the Chaocipher method created by J.F. Byrne in 1918, which uses a duel rotational pattern for a changeable symbiotic relationship between two alphabets. Finally, this presentation will present descriptive information of a person of interest in the Zodiac case believed to have been previously unidentified by law enforcement.

2018 - American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) Annual Meeting Words: 192 words || 
Info
5. Bryson, Karen (Maggie). "Fashion Forward: Dress and Decoding the Queenly Images of the Early 19th Dynasty" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt (ARCE) Annual Meeting, University Park Hotel, Tucson, AZ, Apr 20, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1389345_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract Proposal
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The early 19th Dynasty was a time of change. Although it is usually considered an era of “restoration,” the influence of Amarna was still felt through its impact on the iconographic and stylistic vocabulary available to artists and patrons. One area in which the dialog between the return to orthodoxy and the persistence of Amarna influence is visible is in representations of the first Ramesside queens. Although the ideology and iconography of Ramesside queenship have been extensively explored, particularly at the programmatic level, the highly constructed nature of Egyptian imagery makes it possible to derive new perspectives from focused analysis of even well-known material. This paper presents the dress and personal ornaments of the wives and mothers of Seti I and Ramesses II as an independent locus for the communication of important and varied mythological ideas about queenship. In addition, when the dress of the first Ramesside queens is contextualized with regard to that of the royal women of the 18th Dynasty, an unexpectedly continuous development can be seen. This continuity not only reflects ongoing change in the ideology of queenship and standards of decorum, but may have dynastic-political implications as well.

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