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2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6204 words || 
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1. Shelly, Robert., Lacombe, Donald. and Shelly, Ann. "Holiday Decorations as Status Cues: Should I Decorate Like the Neighbor?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p503693_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Decorative holiday displays are a hallmark of holiday celebrations in American society and are becoming more common as community contests encourage their development. Competition between neighborhoods and neighbors for the most elaborate display are reported in both print and electronic media. We analyze these developments in the context of status claims made by community members both in competition with their neighbors and as forms of discourse about neighborhood social position in the larger community. We report on data collected in a variety of geographic locations in North America. This report focuses on the level of decoration observed in neighborhoods. Areal regression is employed to test how neighbors influence one another in the level of decoration they display on their homes.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 148 words || 
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2. Fumian, Silvia. ""Everything Is Illuminated": Image and Decoration in the MS Modena, Biblioteca Estense, Alpha F.9.9" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p524920_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The musical MS Alpha.F.9.9 at the Biblioteca Estense in Modena is known to musicologists for the richness of its collections of frottole and strambotti. Created in Padova in 1496 by a Magister Iohannes as a gift for his student Franciscus de Fa[?], the codex is uniquely characterized by an extremely sophisticated appearance. This extraordinary display involves the graphic layout, the decoration, and the illumination accompanying not only text and music, but also the initial dedicatory paratexts. (Particularly remarkable elements include the presence of purple folia, use of polychrome inks, and numerous botanical and ornithological illustrations.) In my paper I will analyze the illuminations and layout of the codex to demonstrate that they are the product of choices deeply rooted in Paduan cultural milieux. Such choices, however, were not conventional for the times or the typology of the manuscript, which was thus the result of a deliberate cultural choice.

2012 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 147 words || 
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3. Carney, Sophie. "Legitimizing Queenship, Visualizing Love: Henrietta Maria and the Decoration of the Queen's House at Greenwich" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Washington, DC,, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p557176_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Images of dynastic legitimacy and union, marital love, and King Charles and his queen’s mutua fecunditas littered the interiors of the Queen’s House in the 1630s. Using visual and archival materials and focusing specifically on the surviving Queen’s House interior features, this paper will interpret the multiple identities of female royalty, focusing on the representations of marital reconciliation and legitimacy in the patronage of Queen Henrietta Maria at Caroline Greenwich. The coupling of Carlomarian and French royal iconographies on the queen’s bedchamber grotesque ceiling will provide the iconographic foundations through which to understand the Queen’s House as a concept embodying the public and private self-imaging of the Anglo-French queen consort. Through an interpretation of the architecture, decorative schemes and location I will contextualise the Queen’s House’s status within the political and cultural topographies of Stuart London, and more specifically, within the gendered framework of the queen’s court.

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 230 words || 
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4. Kleutghen, Kristina. "The Japanese Taste in High Qing Court Decorative Arts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p953549_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Although there was no formal diplomatic relationship between Tokugawa Japan and Qing China, trade between them continued from the Chinese port of Ningbo, close to the Qing craft capital of Suzhou. In the eighteenth century, both Japanese imports and Japanese-style elements were regularly seen in the decorative arts of the High Qing court. Maki-e lacquer boxes continued to be imported, differing dramatically from Chinese lacquerwork, but distinctively stylized chrysanthemum forms began to appear on porcelain produced at Jingdezhen. Perhaps the most common element in Chinese court crafts was the application of illusionistic furoshiki patterned wrapping cloths rendered in two- and three-dimensional forms around both vessels and boxes, always a permanent part of the work but only very rarely rendered in actual cloth.
In contrast to the Western or occidentalizing presence often seen in Qing court decorative arts, which has dominated the discourse on foreign taste, the Japanese taste remains little understood. Furthermore, the effects of intra-Asian trade and contact on painting are well established in Japan, but the corollary effects on late imperial Chinese decorative arts have been largely overlooked. By analyzing what objects were imported relative to what stylistic, material, and formal elements were adapted for objects crafted in China, this paper seeks to reorient the significance of Qing court interest in appropriating the exotic in its craftwork away from the West toward other East Asian sources of inspiration.

2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 151 words || 
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5. Bontemps, Sébastien. ""L’esprit de convenance": Classical Rules and Irregularities in Parisian Religious Carved Decoration (1650–1700)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p753121_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In France, the Declaration of the King for the reconstruction of churches, 1661, led to a wave of new decorations in the churches in Paris. Facing medieval architecture or included in the new structures, the carved decorations created during 1650-1700 period gave rise to controversies reflected in religious and architecture treatises. The creation of the Royal Academy of Architecture in 1671 launched the debates on the suitability of this decorations (l’esprit de convenance), which entailed the issues of congruence and harmony of sculptural decorations with architectural standards and religious function. The solutions considered often stood in opposition to official theory, such as in the cases of rood screens and altars. Architects proposed a new ornamental vocabulary, such as the trophée d’église, which was criticized by the Academy but gradually become essential for sanctuaries. The development of the debates enables to define the difference between the classical rules and irregularies in practice.

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