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2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
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1. Rogers, Melvin. "Democracy, Elites, and Power: Dewey Reconsidered" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p150779_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 9004 words || 
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2. Pogrebinschi, Thamy. "Ordinary Democracy: Marx and Dewey on the Political Subject" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p209580_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The claim that democracy should be grounded on human experience rather than on political institutions underlies both Marx’s and Dewey’s writings. Both of them put forward quite similar concepts of the political subject, though based on different frameworks and postulates. Before turning the proletariat into a historical subject, the young Marx had written extensively on the ‘generic being’ (Gattungswesen) as a central notion to both his ideas of democracy and emancipation. As he described in his critique of representation, the generic being is anyone who turn a socially relevant need into a generic activity thus representing every men as a determination of him. The image that Marx gives for the generic being is that of a cobbler who, by simple being who he is and doing what he does, might intervene politically as much as a representative, and hence turn civil society into a real political society. Bringing the political to the level of the ordinary and the mundane, Dewey had a more definite conception of the ‘common man’ and his role on implementing a creative democracy. Certainly influenced by Marx, Dewey opposed ‘political democracy’ to what he called an ‘idea of democracy’, that is democracy conceived as a way of life. Taken as a human habit rather than a set of institutional and formal arrangements, Dewey’s democracy is grounded on the intelligence and creativity of men who should experience the political as part of their everyday life. The intersection of Marx’s generic being and Dewey’s common man leads to the main claim of this paper: the political belongs to the ordinary, and notwithstanding the names one gives to the political subject his role should be one of underlying the centrality of human experience in building up democracy.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5357 words || 
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3. Whipple, Mark. "The Dewey-Lippmann Debate Today: Negotiating the Divide Between Participatory and Elitist Models of Democracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p108740_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper reconstructs the Dewey-Lippmann debate of the 1920s, an exchange that centered on their contrasting normative ideals of democracy. While the debate holds historical significance in itself, this paper uses it as a historical point of departure toward the broader sociological objective of understanding the current direction of democratic scholarship. In particular, this paper focuses on the descendants of Lippmann and Dewey – the democratic elitists and the participatory democrats. While the elitist model tends to hold a dominant position in academic and popular discourse, I argue that the divide between elites and citizens can be bridged if the habits surrounding knowledge and expertise are fundamentally transformed – that is, if citizens as well as elites engage in intelligent and critical reflective agency. I conclude the paper by outlining three empirical social problems – the expansion of intellectual property rights, media conglomerates, and reliance on standardized tests – that work to delimit the capabilities of public citizens to engage in critical and reflective agency, and thus to bridge the gap between themselves and elites. I suggest that radical and participatory democrats must struggle with these empirical issues in order to understand and ultimately transform the tense relationship between expert knowledge and democracy.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 19 words || 
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4. Wallach, John. "John Dewey, Democratic Education, and Cosmopolitan Community" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85715_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A critical evaluation of John Dewey's work on democratic education, in relation to the task of building cosmpolitan community.

2006 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 11721 words || 
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5. Callaghan Pisapia, Michael. "Democratic Discovery and Dewey's Ethical Principle of Growth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Albuquerque, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Mar 17, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p97396_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this essay is to discover the possibility of a democratic inquiry into politics or a public political science by fully embracing John Dewey’s educational philosophy and political theory. I discuss a combination of ethical criteria rooted in Dewey’s philosophy, especially his concern for the continued growth of the members of a political community, as well as an expansion of the bounds of community. In Part I, I explain the relevance of Dewey’s thought for political philosophy and political science. I examine the differences between interactional and transactional views of the subject-matter of inquiry in order to reveal Dewey’s aesthetic account of individual experience. In part II, I define democratic inquiry in terms of an educational theory of politics. I also address links between the interactional view and an actor-centered theory of negative liberty, and between the transactional view and an education-centered theory of positive freedom. In part III, I argue that the three modes of educational politics, being educated, educating, and the state of education, stand in need of justification and require us to rethink what we mean by responsibility. In the last part, I return to a more explicit discussion of doing inquiry into politics, of engaging in democratic discovery.

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