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2015 - ASEEES Convention Words: 98 words || 
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1. Girvin, Cammeron. "Dialect and 'Dialect' in Bulgarian Folk Song Texts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1021470_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: A linguistic analysis of Bulgarian song texts explicitly identified as “folk” indicates that both pre-industrial songs and those composed in the socialist era share a bundle of nonstandard linguistic features, primarily archaisms and dialectisms. These traits together characterize a register, imprecisely and paradoxically described by native scholars as a purified national “dialect.” Because many of the features of the register are also found in Macedonian, this paper suggests that widespread familiarity in Bulgaria with the linguistic nuances of these songs may be part of the reason that many Bulgarians are unwilling to regard Macedonian as an independent language.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Levy, Benjamin. "Unchaining the Dialectic: Toward a General and Intersectional Formulation of Marx’s Systematic-dialectical Method" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119881_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The goal of “bringing anti-systemic movements together” is a fundamental one. However, there is a danger that, by taking Marxian interpretations of concepts like “social system” and “world-system” for granted, theorists risk eliding many of the extra-economic practices, interests, and relations that inform social movement praxis. As such, my essay aims to critique and reconstruct traditional Marxian accounts of social systems, specifically by showing how the “systematic-dialectical” method – a method formulated by the philosopher G.W.F. Hegel and employed most famously by Karl Marx – can be generalized from its application to capitalism and used to theorize other, extra-economic systems such as those of hetero-patriarchy, white supremacy, and authoritarian statism. My justification for this project is based on an internal critique of Marx’s philosophy, whereby the validity of a critical social theory depends on its rootedness in the concepts generated through everyday life and social struggle. Given that contemporary activists are often driven not only by their experiences of exploitation under capitalism - but also by forms of oppression characteristic of extra-economic institutions like those aforementioned – it follows that, by Marx’s own epistemological criteria, the dialectical method should be extended beyond its traditional domain of political economy. Providing an initial account of such a method comprises the goal of this essay, which develops several prima facie insights, questions, and criteria of success that might guide a more comprehensive employment of the dialectical method to the end of better informing and uniting anti-systemic struggles.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 31 pages || Words: 8809 words || 
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3. Hawk, Patricia. "Dialectics of Domination and Resistance: Managing and Maintaining Dialectical Tensions in Organizing for Social Change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p257741_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This critical/interpretive study examines dialectics of domination and resistance as they are experienced and expressed by a small social movement organization (SMO). The study considers the role narrative plays in maintaining organizational identification. Narratives suggest that members experience at least three dialectical tensions as they challenge the dominant meaning and power structures in the local Catholic diocese. Rather than seeking unanimity of opinion, this SMO manages and maintains these tensions during regular organizational dialogues.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6815 words || 
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4. Bradley, William. "The Dialectic of Internationalization and Globalization in Japanese Universities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109233_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Throughout the 1980s and 90s in Japan, discussions of internationalization were frequent in relation to many different institutions of society, including education. A prominent example was the targeting of 100,000 foreign students in higher education, a goal finally reached in 2003.
Globalization has changed the way that Japanese higher education institutions view internationalization by bringing forward considerations of their role as knowledge institutions. Renewed emphasis on research, scientific knowledge production, and human capital formation for international competition have led Japanese universities to seek more network linkages with international partner institutions. A challenge to the accepted practices of allowing those actors (faculty and students) who are most inclined to pursue international connections and opportunities autonomously is apparent in a move toward a more integrated internationalization. This involves struggles over the codification of international practices within the university. This paper reviews the uses of internationalization and globalization in Japanese universities, illustrating their strong ideological bases.
Concurrently, the advent of a new law governing public universities, set to take effect in April of 2004, entails that they become IAIs (Independent Administrative Institutions) and ostensibly more transparent and accountable in funding and outcomes. While the public universities are only a minority of the higher education institutions in Japan, they have a disproportionate influence due to their elite status. I conclude that that the problem of change deriving from internationalization and globalization in Japanese universities is not that it is ideological but that it is bureaucratically driven and not openly ideological.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6725 words || 
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5. Houvouras, Shannon. "There's Something About the Experience: Revisiting O'Brien's Dialectics of Reproduction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183825_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In her analysis of the dialectical structure of reproductive consciousness, Mary O’Brien argued that the physical labor involved in women’s reproductive experiences affirms women’s connections with their children and integration into the human species, whereas men’s discontinuous experiences negate such connections and integration. Patriarchy enables the reconciliation of this negation for men, by allowing them to claim ownership of the products of women’s reproductive labor. Drawing on interview data with 18 postpartum women, this paper re-examines O’Brien’s central argument in conjunction with empirical data. The findings support O’Brien’s assertions that (1) work is viewed by some women as an essential component of childbearing, and (2) childbearing results in a sense of greater connectedness and integration into the human species for some women. However, women also emphasized the importance of another element of childbearing – an indescribable, in-comprehensible, experiential component – that is missing from O’Brien’s analysis and much feminist literature on reproduction. It is argued that placing this experiential element of childbearing at the center of feminist work can further our understanding of reproductive experiences and enhance current debates over the appropriate role of men in childbearing.

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