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Showing 1 through 5 of 65 records.
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2007 - International Communication Association Words: 1 words || 
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1. Muria, Magali. "University of California, San Diego “How Do We See Our Neighbors to the North? The Representation of San Diego in the Tijuana Press”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173466_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper

2009 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 443 words || 
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2. Uddin, Lisa. "Flight Distance: Zoo Design and Urban Anxiety in Postwar San Diego" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Renaissance Hotel, Washington D.C., <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p318296_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: In the late 1960s, when British zoologist Desmond Morris denounced modern cities for being unlivable, he joined a nascent chorus of social critics concerned with the biological aspects of postwar urban life and the potential of nonhuman models to make sense of it. Morris’ critique connected the impoverished condition of city-dwellers with those of animals, but rejected the familiar metaphor of urban space as wilderness. With its fetishists, homosexuals and murderers, the metropolitan environment had become highly unnatural; less a wilderness or jungle than an artificial “human zoo” – the title of Morris’ best-selling book. He advised planners to build sprawling, verdant living spaces for people, much like those that architects had begun to design for captive animals in American zoos.

This paper considers these expansive new animal spaces as they took shape at the San Diego Zoo and gave expression to human preoccupations with postwar urbanism. The San Diego Zoo was a sociobiologist’s dream and the pride of its booming city. A new generation of animal exhibits elaborated on the notion of more natural urban living, by displaying open-air enclosures, copious vegetation, and a robust and fertile animal population. Drawing on visual and oral history archives of the Zoo and the city, I specifically trace how designers, managers, curators, and marketers embraced and localized an au courante concept in zoology known as “flight distance.” Introduced to zoo professionals by the German animal psychologist Heini Hediger in the 1950s, flight distance refers to the amount of space an animal requires between itself and a potential enemy in order to feel safe (Heini Hediger, Wild Animals in Captivity, 1950). Hediger’s principle confirmed the biological need to increase living quarters and create comfort zones for captive animals, resulting in physical changes that improved the lives of many zoo denizens and boosted their reproduction. At the same time, flight distance helped produce a zoological representation of San Diego’s exponential growth and the attendant racial, ethnic and spatial anxieties of its citizens: a complex picture of postwar “white flight” with exotic fauna as Southern Californians. Emphasis on maintaining a minimum of inter-species distance spoke quietly to middle-class fears about spatial proximity amongst San Diego’s different racial and ethnic communities, but also to the democratic promise of a suburban home for all. Designing for flight distance and promoting its sensibility articulated these mixed feelings on Zoo grounds, and, I suggest, both signified and endorsed the residential settings that defined the city as a sun-belt refuge from America’s urban deformity. In San Diego, zoo makers sought to overcome Morris’ menacing human zoo with the construction of utopic animal suburbs where animality itself appeared as an ideal mode of sociality.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 185 words || 
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3. Martinez, Ramiro. and Stowell, Jacob. "Tracking Trends of Social Structural Transitions and Violence in San Diego Neighborhoods, 1960-2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517754_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Emerging violent crime research suggests that immigration has been inaccurately labeled as a cause of crime in contemporary society. But virtually all of the research conducted to date has been cross-sectional in nature and therefore unable to demonstrate how the relationship between immigration and crime might co-vary over time. The current study addresses this issue by exploring the effects of immigration on neighborhood-level homicide trends in the city of San Diego, California. Specifically we identify neighborhoods and/or neighborhood clusters with high immigrant concentrations in 2000, and examine shifts in their structural, compositional, and levels of lethal violence over the past five decennial census periods. The objective of this analysis is to quantify the manner and degree to which immigration has helped shape the social context in the communities into which foreign-born residents settle. Specifically, we find that neighborhoods with a larger share of immigrants have fewer total, non-Latino White, and Latino homicide victims. More broadly, our findings suggest that social disorganization in heavily immigrant cities may be largely a function of economic deprivation rather than forms of neighborhood stability.

2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 121 words || 
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4. Zhang, Sheldon. and Finch, Brian. "Measuring Labor Trafficking with Respondent Driven Sampling: A San Diego Study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p574623_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Research on human trafficking in the U.S. has encountered many definitional as well as operational challenges. Furthermore, most research on human trafficking has been on the sexual exploitation of women and children. International labor and migration organizations believe labor trafficking is perhaps a far more serious problem. But empirical studies on labor trafficking remain rare because of methodological and logistical challenges. This paper represents one of the few current efforts in overcoming major methodological challenges to measure labor trafficking activities directly. Preliminary findings from a successful application of the respondent-driven sampling (RDS) will be presented. This paper calls for greater efforts on primary data collection that can answer basic questions about the prevalence of labor trafficking in the U.S. or elsewhere.

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Words: 143 words || 
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5. Esbenshade, Jill. and Russ, Karina. "The Leased Among Us: Taxi Drivers in San Diego" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p707900_index.html>
Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study explores the structure of the taxi industry in San Diego and its outcomes for lease drivers. We analyze data collected through 311 surveys of lease drivers and 20 in-depth interviews to understand the effects of being a lease driver on worker income, health, and safety. We also track the historical development of the ownership structure, independent contracting, and permitholder-lease driver relations in the industry. This case study gives us a new lens into an industry based entirely on independent contracting. Independent contracting has been both praised as allowing worker autonomy and control and maligned as a form of worker exploitation. In this case study, we document how, even in an industry of very small entrepenuership with largely immigrant owners, independent contracting is used to outsource risk while still being seen by the contracting drivers as advantageous.

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