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2015 - Southwestern Social Science Association 95th Annual Meeting Words: 235 words || 
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1. Smith, Kirstie. "Dieting for Self vs. Society: Conflicting Motivations for Female Dieting Practices" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southwestern Social Science Association 95th Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt Denver, Denver, Colorado, Apr 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p988552_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This purpose of this project was to interview different women who have engaged in a weight-loss program(s) in order to assess participants’ disordered eating thoughts and behaviors, body satisfaction and perception, motivation for exercise and psychopathology. Interviewing method was used in order to get a more comprehensive understanding of female weight-loss practices and behaviors.

The study consisted of five individual 2-hour interviews. It was revealed that the female participants were less likely to associate their sequential weight gain and/or desire to lose weight with external/societal factors than they were to internalize/personalize their motivation. Therefore, when asked directly there was a greater chance of “body satisfaction” --as oppose to societal influences-- to be recorded for weight-loss motivation. This was contradictory to the participants overall discussion of weight-loss motivation.

Body perception served as a catalyst for weight-loss motivation. Further, while the participants suggested that actual weight loss was the most important factor when completing weight-loss programs, negative body perception served as the strongest predictor of starting a weight-loss program. During the weight-loss regiment, increased positive body perception and positive societal feedback strongly predicted weight-loss success. These results held true over each interview.

This project served as a pilot study. To further this initial study, the sample size will be increased to test if the results are still supported. If this is the case, future research will test the lineage between weight loss (number) fixation and weight loss success.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Insolera, Noura. "Parental Diet Disease Knowledge and Child Diet and Obesity Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1251848_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: By using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and its Child Development Supplement, the intergenerational transmission of diet disease knowledge, socioeconomic status, and child health behaviors are considered in their associations with the outcomes of child diet in 2002, and in turn their associations with child obesity in 2007. Information used in this analysis includes, but is not limited to, age, race, sex, Body Mass Index, diet, sleep, and exercise. For this paper, 1,691 parent-child pairs make up the samples which will be weighted in order to make the sample nationally representative of the age group in United States population. By linking parent and child variables into one data set, it is possible to look at how demographic, socioeconomic, health status, and health behaviors are associated with child diet and child obesity. By utilizing linear and logistic regression methods, it is possible to look at these factors to see which items are associated with obesity. In order to facilitate this research, three key indexes are created to capture parental diet disease knowledge, child dietary diversity, and child obesity for each parent-child pair. The results show that increased diet-disease knowledge of the parent significantly increases the dietary diversity of the child, and in turn, the more diverse a child’s diet the lower odds they have of becoming obese.

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