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2016 - LRA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Teichert, Laura. "When children move fluidly between digital and non-digital activities: How children’s non-digital play influences their digital choices" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA Annual Conference, OMNI Nashville, Nashville, Tennessee, Nov 29, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1143105_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 9472 words || 
Info
2. Eko, Lyombe., Kumar, Anup. and Yao, Qingjiang (Q. J.). "To Digitize or Not to Digitize: The Google Digital Books Universal Library Initiative and the Exceptionalist Intellectual Property Law Regimes of the United States and France" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p556390_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper addressed the question of what happens when the idea of a universal, digital, online library created and controlled by Google Inc., an American information and communication technology company, is confronted with the highly proprietary, exceptionalist copyright regime of the United States, and the equally exceptionalist, bureaucratized, intellectual property regime of France. To address this question, we carried out a comparative analysis of the legal and cultural challenges faced by Google Books in the United States and Google Livres in France, as they sought to digitize and store millions of books in both countries. It was found that the United States government was mostly concerned with the copyright and antitrust ramifications of the digitization initiative while the French government was concerned with the intellectual property and cultural heritage implications of the digitization of French books. The postures of both countries were consonant with their respective intellectual property regimes.

2016 - Association of Teacher Educators Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Fogleman, Jay. and Niedbala, Mona. "Developing Digital Teachers from Digital Natives by Supporting Them as Digital Learners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators Annual Meeting, Chicago Hilton, Chicago, IL, Feb 11, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1046533_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The need for teachers who can blend technology effectively into their practice is mounting. As student enter our teacher education programs more comfortable with using personal technology, the challenge is to help them become effective digital learners and teachers. This session will describe patterns and trends in the technological strengths and weaknesses of freshmen education students over the past five years as well as strategies and activities to help the become more effective digital learners.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 8693 words || 
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4. Riggs, Karen. "The Digital Divide’s Gray Fault Line: Aging Workers, Technology, and Policy The Digital Divide’s Gray Fault Line: Aging Workers, Technology, and Policy The Digital Divide's Gray Fault Line: Aging Workers, Technology, and Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112421_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on the author's ethnographic and textual analysis research over a five-year period in the United States, the paper observes that older generations of workers are getting used to the new models of technology-driven communication but may not feel "at home" in them. The author suggests steps for policy makers to stimulate and reward older workers, whose roles in the "new work" are both vital and threatened. Proceeding from data suggesting that work status often drives home computer and Internet competencies and usage in the lives of Americans over 50, the author acknowledges that the advancing age of Baby Boomers will cause some generational differences in competency and usage to disappear, but cultural differences among elders will persist. Effective public policy for curing the Digital Divide must include attention to older Americans on the margins, many of whom are single women, racial minorities, and residents of central-city or rural areas, the author claims. Recommendations include:
1. Tailor retirement systems for individual differences.
2. Make employment sectors elder friendly.
3. Make the educational system non-discriminatory.
4. Eliminate ageist practices inside the academy.
5. Strengthen policies to deter age discrimination by employers.
6. Encourage inclusive images of older workers.
7. Stop retrofitting facilities to "shoehorn" in disabled (often older) workers.
8. Encourage intergenerational learning communities.
9. Pursue age studies and intergenerational research.
The author concludes that citizens must assume a collective responsibility for re-creating social environments that will accommodate unprecedented complexities of intergenerational living in today's world.

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