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2006 - XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies Words: 400 words || 
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1. Bergeson, Tonya., Spisak, Kristen. and Houston, Derek. "Attention to Infant-Directed Versus Adult-Directed Speech in Normal-Hearing Infants and Hearing-Impaired Infants with Cochlear Implants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the XVth Biennial International Conference on Infant Studies, Westin Miyako, Kyoto, Japan, Jun 19, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93943_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Background and Aims: Recent research has shown that hearing-impaired infants with cochlear implants (CIs) do not prefer speech sounds over silence, as measured by looking time at a checkerboard pattern (Houston, Pisoni, Kirk, Ying, & Miyamoto, 2003). The same infants are capable of discriminating these novel speech sounds even though they do not prefer them to silence. Are infants with CIs simply uninterested in speech sounds? It is well known that young infants with normal hearing prefer the highly exaggerated characteristics of infant-directed speech to adult-directed speech. It might also be the case that implanted infants would attend more to speech over silence if the speech were presented in an infant-directed manner. The present study investigated the effects of auditory deprivation and cochlear implantation on infants’ attention to infant-directed speech, adult-directed speech, and silence.
Methods: We tested normal-hearing (NH) 4.5- to 24.5-month-old infants (N = 70) and hearing-impaired infants with CIs (N = 3). Using an infant-controlled visual preference procedure, attention was measured by infants’ looking time to a checkerboard pattern. We presented infants with three conditions: 1) ID speech, in which four women produced four sentences in an infant-directed manner, 2) AD speech, in which the same women produced the same four sentences in an adult-directed manner, and 3) silence.
Key Results: As expected, the results revealed that 4.5- and 12-month-old NH infants looked longer at the checkerboard pattern during ID speech more than AD speech and silence (p < .01). Although 6- and 24-month-old NH infants preferred speech over silence (p < .01), they did not show any preference for ID speech over AD speech. Surprisingly, all three hearing-impaired infants with CIs preferred silence to both ID speech and AD speech.
Conclusions: Most previous studies that have shown preferences for infant-directed over adult-directed speech have been conducted with infants younger than 5 months of age. Perhaps the results of the normal-hearing infants reveal a developmental trend to attend to different properties of speech as they acquire speech perception and language skills (e.g., phonology, lexicon). The unexpected results of the CI infants may be due to their unique speech therapy experiences in which they are trained to explicitly respond to sound, or may be due to other issues associated with hearing-impairment. These important new findings serve to broaden understanding of implanted infants’ abilities to perceive and understand speech.
[Supported by NIH/NIDCD Training Grant T32DC00012 and NIH/NIDCD Research Grant R01DC006235.]

2008 - 93rd Annual Convention Words: 165 words || 
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2. Fulton, DoVeanna. "Defining Direction, Building Coalitions: Directing African American Studies at the University of Alabama" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 93rd Annual Convention, Sheraton Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p273882_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: This point of discussion comes from the perspective of the director of African American Studies. These talking points focus on what I have found to be the most significant areas for developing and sustaining the African American Studies program, specifically, defining the program’s direction and coalition building. At the heart of this project is the need to recognize and articulate a philosophical understanding of African American Studies. Beginning with Wahneema Lubiano’s statement, “The imperative of the work of Afro-American cultural discourse is and had been (whether explicitly stated or implicitly engaged) to engage itself in a two-part project:…the necessary reclamation of a history and a culture as a revision of the ‘big lies’ of the colonizer and …the resort to cultural modes of struggle necessary in the face of a global economy that marginalizes third world and minority people,” African American Studies at the University of Alabama has a three-fold mission: intellectual, representational, outreach. This presentation examines this mission in practice.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Parise, Eugenio. and Csibra, Gergely. "Infant Directed Speech and Direct Eye Contact Share Common Neural Basis in 5-Month-Old Infants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p951902_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Infants' sensitivity to ostensive signals, such as direct eye contact and infant-directed speech, is well documented. However it is not clear whether:
1. infants are sensitive to ostension as such rather than to the attention catching properties of ostensive signals;
2. infants respond to co-occurring ostensive signals with additive arousal, or they respond to the presence/absence of ostension in the communication.
We investigated how 5-month-old infants interpret such signals by measuring neural responses such as gamma-band oscillations and event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to their compounds. In Experiment 1, we found that ostensive signals from different modalities display overlapping electrophysiological activity in 5-month-old infants, on both gamma oscillations and ERPs, suggesting that these stimuli share neural processing mechanisms independently of their modality. In Experiment 2, in which infants were presented with compounds of audiovisual stimuli, gamma oscillations did not show a pattern of activation consistent with any of the a priori hypotheses. However, the ERPs showed that the activation to ostensive signals from different modalities reflected the presence of ostension in either stimulus stream. These data support the thesis that ostensive signals obligatorily indicate to young infants that communication is directed to them.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Kuriwaki, Shiro. "Direct and Indirect Legislation of the Minimum Wage: An Examination of the Unbundling Theory of Direct Democracy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1356430_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When citizens can legislate directly by vote in addition to electing representatives, does policy change? U.S. state minimum wage policy shows that when both direct and indirect legislation are possible, policy change often occurs through the latter.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 126 words || 
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5. Silva, Andrea. "Direct Democracy Rules: Direct Democracy Shaping State Immigration Legislation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1127722_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: From 1980-2014, states have exponentially increase the number of state laws about immigration and immigrant. How do direct democracy mechanisms affect legislative behavior on state immigration laws? The current literature on immigration federalism overlooks the impact of direct democracy mechanisms on state immigration law. Using an original dataset state immigration legislation, I use cross sectional time series data to find that states with direct democracy mechanisms will pass more state immigration laws over time than states without direct democracy mechanisms. While in the process of investigating an affect on type of immigration legislation and partisan control, findings suggest that legislators in states with direct democracy mechanisms will pass more state immigration laws to attempt to stop state interest groups from appropriating the state immigration policy agenda.

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