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2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9552 words || 
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1. Garnett, Emily. ""Ag-Recording" Laws Disassembled" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p665720_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Four “Ag-Recording laws” in place in Kansas, Montana, North Dakota, and Utah violate three major First Amendment rights. The laws are overly broad because they restrict a constitutionally protected form of speech, whistleblowing. They are content-based restrictions of speech that are not content-neutral, do not serve a compelling government interest, and are not minimally restrictive. Finally, two of the state laws in place in Kansas and Montana are examples of prior restraint.

2017 - Oral History Association Annual Meeting Words: 160 words || 
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2. Vodniza, Guillermo. "Disassembling Neoliberal Education through Collecting Family Oral stories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Oral History Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Minneapolis, Minneapolis, MN, Oct 04, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1260633_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Too often, funny memories, anecdotes, students’ life experiences, and traditional knowledge of parents, grandparents and great-grandparents are not found in traditional text books and curriculum. I believe in the importance of connecting students’ lives through oral history and storytelling to recognize and celebrate individual’s culture and heritage. I use oral history and traditional storytelling in my teaching practice to support students in discovering about their own traditional values and identity. Where I came from and who I belonged to are stories that are part of my teaching implementation. This article is about illustrating through personal narratives (of growing up in Colombia, and teaching in Colombia and Canada) how oral history and story telling are important pedagogical tools for connecting student to their traditional practices and fostering a deeper understanding of the ‘other’. This article serves the dual purpose of locating myself in the research and addressing possible root causes of social justice issues into the teaching practices in our schools.

2017 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 411 words || 
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3. Goldstein, Alyosha. "The Opposing Horizon: Disassemblies, Affiliations, Extents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1260647_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: This paper conceives of “American Studies” as a critical practice and pedagogical optic for engaging the capacious imperial formations and colonial entanglements of the United States, rather than as a field of inquiry that begins with the “United States” as a self-evident object of study. As elaborated in the collection Formations of United States Colonialism (2014), the United States has never been a uniform or unequivocal geopolitical entity. This is not merely a consequence of prevailing forms of federalism, demographic heterogeneity, or regional particularity. This is not simply a matter of an unavoidable gap between empirical description and the ideal form of the nation-state. Rather, the United States encompasses a historically variable and uneven constellation of state and local governments, indigenous nations, unincorporated territories, free associated commonwealths, protectorates, federally administered public lands, military bases, export processing zones, and planetary neocolonial networks that do not comprehensively delineate an inside and outside of the nation-state. The heterogeneity of this condition is not exceptional to the United States. But even with a burgeoning scholarship scrutinizing US empire and calls for a postnationalist American studies, a critical analytic lens that takes into account the significance of colonialism for the various ways in which the geopolitical configuration of the United States has changed over time remains largely absent. Emphasizing what Lisa Lowe describes as “relations across differences” and “the convergence of asymmetries,” this paper approaches the “United States” as manifest in geopolitically uneven and mobile circuits of power, capital, and commerce that simultaneously link and dissociate people and places.

My analysis is grounded in a specific example at once organized in relation to and excess of the constitutive geopolitical preponderance of the United States. The paper focuses on a campaign that the International Indian Treaty Council (IITC) and the South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO) organized together during the 1970s and 1980s against the multinational corporation AMAX (American Metal Climax Corporation). This campaign linked efforts by the Northern Cheyenne Nation (the Tsitsistas and Só'taa'eo'o People) to end strip mining in Wyoming and initiatives by Ovambo workers to prevent neocolonial resource and labor exploitation in the Tsumeb copper mine in Namibia. This paper considers the collaborative endeavor between IITC and SWAPO, and their simultaneously localized and global conflicts with the extractive neocolonial machinations of AMAX, in terms of what I theorize as disassemblies, affiliations, and extents. I elaborate on these terms as articulated economies of spatial, biopolitical, and oppositional relationality that suggest new ways to conceptualize an American Studies that decenters the United States.

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