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2018 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 234 words || 
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1. D'Attoma, John. and Bruner, Dave. "Public Disclosure and Trust: A Laboratory Experiment on the Effects of Public Disclosure of Tax Returns on Tax Compliance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Canada, Nov 08, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1427680_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: States increasingly face a set of difficult challenges that put significant strain on their budgets, while at the same time, citizens have become more averse to tax increases. Moreover, many argue that austerity and budget cuts have been highly problematic in Europe. This then leaves policy makers with an arduous task: how can they maintain a sustainable budget, while also keeping their citizens content? One way is to increase voluntary tax compliance. There are many ways in which tax administrations can try to elicit more voluntary tax compliance, such as positive rewards, tax lotteries, and educating people on fiscal responsibility. Norway, for example, is one of the only countries in the world that makes tax information public. They argue that this creates a social norm of tax compliant behavior. If taxpayer X knows that anyone can see their tax statements, they'll be less likely to evade. Most countries, however, keep tax records completely confidential. They argue that tax records are private and disclosing this information is a violation of privacy norms which would increase tax evasion by decreasing trust in the state. In this paper, I examine whether public disclosure of tax information can increase tax compliance by employing a tax compliance laboratory experiment in which I disclose participants compliance behavior alongside a picture. Secondly, participants partake in a trust game to examine whether trust mediates the effects of public disclosure on tax compliance.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 11174 words || 
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2. Rains, Steve. and Brunner, Steven. "New Communication Technologies and Self-Disclosure: Do Broadcast Disclosures Have a Uniform Impact Across One’s Social Network?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <OTHER/OCTET-STREAM>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p712491_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social network websites (SNSs) have made it increasing possible to broadcast self-disclosure to some or all of a user’s connections in the network—ranging from close friends to distant acquaintances. Drawing from social penetration theory and research on negativity/positivity effects, two studies were conducted to test the notion that the interpersonal and relational outcomes of such broadcasts are not uniform. The results of the cross-sectional survey offer evidence that responses to positive and negative broadcast disclosures vary based on the receiver’s perceived closeness to the discloser. The findings from the experiment further demonstrate that positive broadcast disclosures have a relatively more beneficial impact among close friends, whereas negative broadcast disclosures have a relatively more detrimental impact among acquaintances.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Choi, Soe Yoon. "Self-Disclosures on Social Network Sites: The Influence of Context and Motivation on Privacy Management and Self-Disclosure Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1235392_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current study employed communication privacy management theory (CPM) to examine how the criteria for privacy rules such as context and motivation influence information boundary management, following self-disclosures on social network sites (SNSs). A structural equation model is proposed to test the hypothesized paths. Findings reveal that perceptions of context for boundless communication positively predict both controlling information (i.e., boundary permeability rule of CPM) and the depth of self-disclosures. Controlling information negatively influences the depth of self-disclosure whereas controlling target (i.e., boundary ownership rule of CPM) positively influences the depth of self-disclosure. Implications of the findings are discussed to advance the modeling of comprehensive information boundary management on SNSs.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 6092 words || 
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4. Cao, Weidan., Qi, Xiaona. and Yao, Ting. "Chinese Cancer Patients’ Perceptions of Disclosure Strategies: Relationships Between Cancer Diagnosis Disclosure and Trust in Doctors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p713479_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Literature indicates that doctor-patient communication influences a cancer patient’s trust on his or her physician. The current study intended to investigate the relationships between different disclosure strategies and cancer patients’ trust in their doctors in China. A total number of 89 effective questionnaires were collected from the cancer patients in China. Results indicated that greater perceived gradual disclosure was associated with higher levels of trust in doctors, and that the perceived amount of information disclosed was positively correlated with the levels of trust. Results also indicated that perceived patient-centered strategies was positively correlated with levels of trust and that perceived emotional support conveyed by doctors was also positively associated with levels of trust. Perceived avoiding using euphemisms was negatively associated with levels of trust, but was no longer a significant predictor when other important variables such as perceived disclosure amount and perceived disclosure rate were included in the regression model.

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