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2011 - American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law Words: 103 words || 
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1. Malloy, Lindsay., Brubacher, Sonja. and Lamb, Michael. "Do expected consequences of disclosure provide insight into delayed disclosure of child sexual abuse?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society / 4th International Congress of Psychology and Law, Hyatt Regency Miami, Miami, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483097_index.html>
Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: In this study, we examined the expected consequences of disclosure discussed by 204 5-to 13-year-old suspected victims of child sexual abuse (CSA) during the course of investigative interviews conducted using the NICHD Protocol. Nearly half of the children mentioned expected consequences, with older children and those alleging multiple incidents more likely to do so. Expecting consequences for the child or another family member, but not the suspect, was associated with delaying disclosure. Results provide insight into motivational influences on CSA disclosure patterns and are of considerable practical interest to legal professionals who must interview and evaluate alleged victims of CSA.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Choi, Soe Yoon. "Self-Disclosures on Social Network Sites: The Influence of Context and Motivation on Privacy Management and Self-Disclosure Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1235392_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current study employed communication privacy management theory (CPM) to examine how the criteria for privacy rules such as context and motivation influence information boundary management, following self-disclosures on social network sites (SNSs). A structural equation model is proposed to test the hypothesized paths. Findings reveal that perceptions of context for boundless communication positively predict both controlling information (i.e., boundary permeability rule of CPM) and the depth of self-disclosures. Controlling information negatively influences the depth of self-disclosure whereas controlling target (i.e., boundary ownership rule of CPM) positively influences the depth of self-disclosure. Implications of the findings are discussed to advance the modeling of comprehensive information boundary management on SNSs.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8731 words || 
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3. Utz, Sonja. "Self-Disclosure on Social Networking Sites: Intimate, But Also Entertaining Self-Disclosure Increases the Feeling of Connection" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p710788_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines whether traditional assumptions about the effect of intimate self-disclosure on relational outcomes still holds for social networking sites (SNS) such as Facebook. Levels of (semi-) public self-disclosure are often high on SNS, although self-disclosure in face-to-face settings usually drops from dyadic to group settings. Status updates are often positive and funny, so self-disclosure might also fulfill an entertainment function. Respondents were asked to judge their own and their friends’ status updates as well as their private conversations on several dimensions (e.g. intimate, entertaining). Motives and effects were also assessed. Although status updates were less intimate than private messages and maintaining friendships was not the main motivation for posting status updates, people felt more connect when they read or posted more intimate messages. However, entertainment also played a major role: People felt more connected with their friends when they read entertaining messages.

2018 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 234 words || 
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4. D'Attoma, John. and Bruner, Dave. "Public Disclosure and Trust: A Laboratory Experiment on the Effects of Public Disclosure of Tax Returns on Tax Compliance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Canada, Nov 08, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1427680_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: States increasingly face a set of difficult challenges that put significant strain on their budgets, while at the same time, citizens have become more averse to tax increases. Moreover, many argue that austerity and budget cuts have been highly problematic in Europe. This then leaves policy makers with an arduous task: how can they maintain a sustainable budget, while also keeping their citizens content? One way is to increase voluntary tax compliance. There are many ways in which tax administrations can try to elicit more voluntary tax compliance, such as positive rewards, tax lotteries, and educating people on fiscal responsibility. Norway, for example, is one of the only countries in the world that makes tax information public. They argue that this creates a social norm of tax compliant behavior. If taxpayer X knows that anyone can see their tax statements, they'll be less likely to evade. Most countries, however, keep tax records completely confidential. They argue that tax records are private and disclosing this information is a violation of privacy norms which would increase tax evasion by decreasing trust in the state. In this paper, I examine whether public disclosure of tax information can increase tax compliance by employing a tax compliance laboratory experiment in which I disclose participants compliance behavior alongside a picture. Secondly, participants partake in a trust game to examine whether trust mediates the effects of public disclosure on tax compliance.

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