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2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Lee, Jiyoung. "Hasty Discussion, Cross-Cutting Exposure, and Tolerance: A Comparative Study of South Korean and American Online Discussants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1228141_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The positive relationship between cross-cutting exposure and tolerance has long been a topic in the political communication field. By reinvestigating this issue, this study further explores whether “hasty” discussion moderates the relationship from a cross-cultural perspective by comparing South Korea with the United States. The authors posit that hasty discussion—a term that was coined to explain South Korean’s fast lifestyle as reflected in discussion processes—is a South Korean characteristic that can have deleterious effects on deliberative democracy. Nine hundred and sixty survey participants (480 South Koreans, 480 Americans) showed meaningful results: 1) Hasty discussion comprises two factors (ignoring discussion processes and pursuing discussion efficiency). 2) Americans are exposed to more cross-cutting opinions than South Koreans, but the positive relationship between cross-cutting exposure and tolerance is more significant in the South Korean sample. 3) In the South Korean sample, ignoring discussion processes negatively affected tolerance. 4) An interaction effect of ignoring discussion processes and cross-cutting exposure on tolerance was found among South Koreans. That is, ignoring the discussion process lowered tolerance.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8051 words || 
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2. Hong, Yangsun. "Gendered Political Discussion and Intersectional Construction of Women’s Political Discussion Networks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p982360_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article attempts to critically analyze the naively but widely accepted findings in the field of political communication about gender difference in political discussion based on feminist perspectives. The current study suggests the concept of discussion opportunity structure, which shows the gendered construction of political discussion network. It implies that political discussion takes place based on reciprocal interactions with people, which are inevitably consequences of gender relations, or social structural positions in general. Using this concept, I tries to identify the gendered discussion network as a result of women’s limited positions in the discussion opportunity structure in three ways: gender segregation, social segregation, and ideological segregation. Then, I suggest feminist intersectionality as a promising framework for examining gender difference in research on politics. I conclude that gender differences in political discussion arise not because women are essentially different from men in terms of psychological traits like avoidance of conflict, having more generous attitude toward others’ opinion -as political communication scholars often argue-, but because of the structural, situational, and institutional factors that construct women’s discussion networks, which are inevitably sexually, socially, and ideologically segregated.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 6848 words || 
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3. Hardy, Bruce. "Political Discussion and Democratic Citizenship: Comparing Heterogeneous and Homogeneous Political Discussion as Promoters of Active Citizenry" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p11888_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political communication scholars have put forward contrasting theories and produced contradictory evidence in attempts to explain the impact of heterogeneity of political discussion on active citizenship. However, most of these studies examined the effects of heterogeneous discussion independently of homogenous discussion. This is overly simplistic, of course, given that most citizens are likely to be mobilized through discussion with both likeminded and non-likeminded discussion partners. This study examines the opposing claims on the civic consequences of heterogeneous political discussion empirically and directly compares the influence of heterogeneous and homogeneous political discussion on indicators of active citizenship. Overall, two general findings emerged. First, heterogeneous political discussion does encourage democratic citizenship and, second, heterogeneous political discussion and homogeneous political discussion have different effects on indicators of active citizenship.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 7565 words || 
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4. Eveland, Jr., William., Hively, Myiah. and Morey, Alyssa. "Discussing Measures of Political Discussion: An Evaluation of the Measurement of Network Size, Agreement, and Disagreement and Implications for Inferences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 21, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300805_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we evaluate common approaches to the measurement of political discussion in the survey literature. We compare the use of “discussant generators” and, for lack of a better term, “general” approaches to the measurement of network size, agreement, and disagreement. We further evaluate various criteria for assessing agreement, including shared party identification, shared gender, shared race, and respondent self-assessment of tendency to politically agree with specific discussion partners. We assess the extent to which research conclusions about the size of networks and the extent of exposure to political disagreement are likely to vary based on these different measurement approaches in the literature. We also evaluate the extent to which associations between network size, agreement, and disagreement and outcomes such as political knowledge and political participation are likely to vary depending on the measurement approach. We conclude that descriptive assessments are probably only weakly affected, but relationship assessments may well be more substantially affected by measurement technique, especially for network size.

2011 - AECT International Convention Words: 78 words || 
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5. Han, Ninghua. and Cheon, Jongpil. "F080-SICET Effects of Facilitation Strategies on Students’ Participation and Online Discussions: Sample Message and Discussion Criteria" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AECT International Convention, Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront, Jacksonville, FL, Nov 08, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p513359_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined the effects of two facilitation strategies on asynchronous discussions in a Chinese online course. Discussion criteria and sample message were applied to expect more students’ participation and the higher quality of postings in this study. However, the findings indicated that they did not increase students’ participation whereas the sample message negatively influenced the quality of online discussions. We conjecture that the sample message yielded simple responses (i.e., agree or disagree) rather than their own opinions.

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