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2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 6770 words || 
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1. Tandoc, Edson. "Displacing the Displacement Hypothesis? Does the Internet Really Displace Traditional Media?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p581594_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using national surveys in the Philippines in 2003 (n = 76,100) and 2008 (n = 60,817), this study revisits the media displacement hypothesis. It looks at the proportions of media use devoted to traditional media (newspaper, magazine, movies, radio and television) and to the internet. The proportions devoted to newspaper, magazine and radio use decreased while internet increased. But those for movie-going and television also increased. The study tries to answer why.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10320 words || 
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2. Davis, Daniel. and Rubin, Beth. "Displacement in New Economy Labor Markets: How High-Tech Cities Influence Post-Displacement Wage Loss" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p724313_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We use data from the 2012 Displaced Workers Supplement of the Current Population Survey to examine both the direct and moderating effects that residing in high-technology cities has on post-displacement wage loss. This study contributes to previous research seeking to explain post-displacement wage loss and is the first to use national data to examine how high-tech cities influence post-displacement wages. Our findings partially support our hypotheses with respect to the wage enhancing effect of human capital, the wage depressing effect of age and the relevance of workers’ being in high-tech versus low-tech cities. These findings are relevant both for theorizing about the new economy and for policy.

2018 - Comparative and International Education Society Conference Words: 157 words || 
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3. Mun, Olga., Vitrukh, Mariya. and Kutkina, Anna. "Negotiating student narratives and academics’ professional identity in times of displacement: Case study of three displaced universities in Ukraine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, Mar 25, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1354409_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This conference paper presents the results of the small exploratory project funded by the grant from the US Embassy in Ukraine which focuses on understanding how the displacement affected education experience of 33 students and professional identity of 16 professors and administration staff from three displaced universities. The study presents the results of the three focus groups with students, two focus groups and seven in-depth interviews with academics from the displaced universities. The data from initial interviews is supplemented by the field observations, information provided by the university representatives, Coordination Centre for Displaced Universities, articles printed in mass media and gathered from the informal interviews with the representatives of nine other displaced universities collected during the second fieldwork. We do acknowledge the fact that the sample size is small and may not be representative. However, due to nature of an in-depth qualitative data, we affirm that this study is informative and sheds light on this significant issue.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5597 words || 
Info
4. Thomas, Juli. "Variation in Parental Displacement Experiences and Children’s Educational Outcomes: Single Mothers’ Post-Displacement Unemployment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722198_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Parental job displacement can lead to a period of unemployment, but the length of unemployment following a displacement varies substantially, in some cases not occurring at all. Brand and Simon Thomas (2014) find significant decreases in high school completion and college attendance as well as increases in depression among children whose single mothers were displaced. This study examines variations in single mothers’ job displacement length, using logistic and OLS regression models, and looks at the effects on children’s educational outcomes, using propensity score matching models, to move toward a more nuanced understanding of the effects of parental job displacement on children’s educational outcomes. The National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979 (NLSY 1979) is used in combination with the Child-Mother File to find that the time that single mothers spend unemployed following a job displacement does not appear to affect their children’s educational choices, beyond the shock of the displacement event itself, other than increasing the chance of part-time college enrollment. Implications of these findings are discussed.

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