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2012 - Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 256 words || 
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1. Häusermann, Silja. and Geering, Dominik. "Policy congruence and distributive politics: matching voter preferences and party positions on distributive issues" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p548232_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Do parties still represent their voters’ preferences with regard to distributive policies? Two negative answers can be found in the literature: recent research on party system change argues that party competition today is structured by cultural, rather than economic issues, because economic issues are seen as mere technical questions that are increasingly out of the hands of national governments. An even more radical literature questions the voter-party link altogether: these authors see current party politics as purely elite-based and detached from voter preferences. Both strands of literature underline their argument by showing that parties have changed their positions on economic policies as compared to the post-war past.
We argue that such approaches may underestimate party-voter congruence since they do not take shifting electoral configurations and shifting policy agendas into account. Distributive politics is not just about more vs. less state intervention anymore, because both the social structure and economic interests have changed profoundly, and this needs to be taken into account when we study party-voter congruence. Parties may advocate different policies because they represent different voters. Hence, congruence may still be there with regard to economic issues, even though policy positions have changed. However, we expect congruence to vary across countries, party types/families and reform dimensions.
We test our arguments with regard to labour market policy preferences in Germany, the UK, Austria and Switzerland. We rely on a newly compiled data set on party positions in electoral campaigns (coded data from newspaper analysis) and compare them to voter preferences on the basis of micro-level survey data.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7791 words || 
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2. Braun, Joshua. "Toward a Field of “Distribution Studies:” Considering the Role of Media Distribution in Society and Scholarship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p980083_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Perhaps even more directly than questions of production or content, the study of distribution cuts straight to the heart of who has access to culture and on what terms. However, distribution has typically received less attention from communication scholars than other areas like media production, analysis of media texts, or studies of audience effects. This paper examines the areas where media distribution practices and research intersect with important issues in communication scholarship. It makes the case that, precisely because distribution touches on so many areas of social importance and scholarship, it can and should be advanced as a subject of study in its own right.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Hansen, Martin Ejnar. "Distributing Party and Committee Posts: A Parliamentary Theory of Distribution" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1125206_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Traditionally the study of committees in European parliaments has borrowed its theoretical basis from the well-developed congressional theories of legislative organisation. However, in recent years there has been a growing awareness among European parliamentary scholars that these theories do not work well in parliamentary settings and a different approach might be required. This has not least come out of a wide range of empirical tests of the major theories of legislative organisation, all of which are formulated on the US case, with all the empirical tests coming back inclusive as to which, if any, of the existing theories works best for the parliamentary cases.
Another major criticism is that the existing theories rarely takes government portfolio and party posts into account when analysing the distribution of committee posts and other parliamentary spoils. In this paper a theory of parliamentary distribution of all types of positions, taking into account a) ministerial posts, b) party posts, c) committee posts and d) other legislative spoils that are not committee posts, is proposed. It is argued that when in coalition government some parties will accept fewer and/or less important ministerial posts to increase their committee posts and other legislative spoils, while the intra-party allocation of posts are used to balance the power structures in the parliamentary group.
The proposed theory will be tested on evidence from more than 30 years of data from two Scandinavian Parliaments and more than 15 years of data from two devolved assemblies in the United Kingdom. The different types of data will allow for tests of what happens in minority coalition governments, majority coalition governments and minority single-party governments. The preliminary findings suggest that the distribution of party and committee posts within a coalitional framework has some global properties allowing us to work under the auspices of a parliamentary theory of distribution. However, it is also clear that more work is required for understanding how parliamentary and party posts are distributed in parliamentary systems.

2017 - DSI Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Oestreich, Nathan., Smith, Sheldon., Smith, Lynn. and Willaimson, James. "Directing Required Minimum Distributions, and Voluntary Distributions, to Charity Can Significantly Reduce Federal Income Taxes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington DC, Nov 18, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1292235_index.html>
Publication Type: Full Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The tax code allows certain taxpayers to make direct charitable contributions from their individual retirement accounts (IRAs) without including the transferred amount as income. This paper explores this law and the possible benefits, especially as it affects the tax on social security benefits. Potential tax reform is also addressed.

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