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2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 8433 words || 
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1. Chen, Ming-chi. "Organizational Life and Death in Industrial Districts: Event History Analysis of District vs. Non-district Bicycle Firms in Taiwan, 1980-1996" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-08-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106544_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Industrial districts, i.e. the spatial concentration of complmentarily specialized firms of the same industry, have aroused much interest among social scientists. Proponents argue that indusrtial districts demonstrate the beginning of a reverse of industrial order from giant corporations back towards regional economies organized around networks of small firms. This paper employs event history analysis on business failure rates of Taiwan's bicycle firms from 1980 to 1996 to examine propositions derived from the industrial district theory. I find that district firms do out-survive the non-district ones, as predicted by the theory. In the context of industrial districts, specialists have higher survival advantage. But small firms benefit less from the district settings than the big ones, contrary to the received wisdom among students of industrial districts. I conclude with some re-thinking about the industrial district theory.

2008 - UCEA Annual Convention Words: 212 words || 
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2. Wayman, Jeffrey., Cho, Vincent. and Johnston, Mary. "The Data-Informed District: A District-Wide Evaluation of Data Use in the Natrona County School District" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Buena Vista Palace Hotel and Spa, Orlando, Florida, <Not Available>. 2019-08-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p274989_index.html>
Publication Type: Symposium Paper
Abstract: For years, educational entities have collected data on school process and student learning. Recent accountability policies have brought public attention to these data, increased the amount of data collected, and tied funding to certain characteristics of these data. Consequently, educators respond to reporting requirements while simultaneously struggling with better ways to understand these data internally to improve practice. To understand and improve district data use, individuals from the Natrona County School District (NCSD) commissioned a district-wide evaluation of data uses and procedures for data-based decision-making. In this report, we present findings from this evaluation. Results provided an in-depth description of data use at every level, showing the hardships of using data but also highlighting many positive structures upon which to build an effective initiative. As a result of this evaluation, the authors recommended the following: (a) a framework to guide NCSD in establishing itself as a data-informed district where data and practice are integrated throughout; (b) a plan for acquiring an efficient data system that can integrate data district-wide; (c) a blueprint for NCSD to use in establishing a healthy, district-wide data initiative; and (d) specific issues for NCSD to address in getting up to speed on data use, such as school dropouts, school differences, public perception, and areas for further study.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6770 words || 
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3. Bowen, Daniel. "Searching for Expressive Harms: District Population and Traditional Districting Principles at the U.S. State Legislative Level" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p360483_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In Bush v. Vera, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the violation of “traditional districting principles” such as geographical compactness and whether district lines are to be drawn over existing political subdivisions can cause “expressive harms” to voters and politicians – perhaps by undermining trust in government and confusing voters. But political scientists have found little evidence of such harms (Altman 1998; but see Engstrom 2000). This research has focused exclusively on the U.S. House of Representatives and utilized only American National Election Study data. Further, this literature has ignored an important district characteristic: population size. Federalist and Anti-Federalist writings show a deep belief that district population can impact the communication linkage between representatives and constituents. To fill these gaps in the literature, I use survey data from the Pew Research Center and the 2008 Cooperative Campaign Analysis Project and examine whether district characteristics like population size and compactness effect citizen attitudes toward government at the state level. To accurately test the effects of such district and state level characteristics on individual opinions, I utilize multilevel modeling.

2010 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1226 words || 
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4. Clifford, Matthew., Brown-Sims, Melissa., Condon, Chris. and Drill, Karen. "Characterizing school districts’ principal hiring practices: Results from a descriptive survey of 730 districts across five Midwestern states" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Sheraton New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Oct 28, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p437947_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: School prinicpal recruitment and hiring is critical to school improvement and turnaround, yet little research is currently available describing common recruitment and hiring practices in the field. Such research provides us with an understanding of practice and its variation in the field, and a baseline for assessing innovative practices. This survey-based study describes principal hiring procedures and the cost of hiring in 730 school districts from five Midwestern U.S. states. The data indicate that, despite within and between state differences, principal hiring is remarkably similar across districts large and small.

2009 - WPSA ANNUAL MEETING "Ideas, Interests and Institutions" Pages: 27 pages || Words: 6174 words || 
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5. Howard, Joseph., Wrobel, Sharon. and Nitta, Keith. "Implementing Change in a Urban School District: A Case Study of the Reorganization of the Little Rock School District" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WPSA ANNUAL MEETING "Ideas, Interests and Institutions", Hyatt Regency Vancouver, BC Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 19, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p317484_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using Matland’s (1995) ambiguity-conflict model of policy implementation, we examine the implementation of a major reform of a school district’s organization through a case study of one urban school district. In July 2005, the Little Rock School District implemented a plan to reorganize the entire district’s management structure. The immediate goal of this plan was to create a more efficient bureaucracy. The reorganization sought to 1) establish a clear line of authority and 2) streamline the organization by eliminating central office positions and redistributing resources to schools. In-depth interviews were conducted with the superintendent and his executive staff; 44 school principals completed in-depth written surveys; and more than 500 telephone surveys of teachers and school staff were conducted. Our findings suggest that successful implementation is directly related to the policy characteristics of ambiguity and conflict. However, we found that these characteristics were perceived differently by different stakeholders. Accordingly, successful implementation required different strategies depending on the stakeholder. Central office and school-based staff perceived little ambiguity and conflict, and the most appropriate strategy was administrative implementation through a top-down provision of resources, specifically training about new roles and responsibilities. In contrast, teachers perceived high ambiguity and low conflict, and experimental implementation was most appropriate. For successful implementation, teachers did not need top-down provision of resources but to discover for themselves the impact of reorganization. Finally, school principals perceived low ambiguity and high conflict, requiring top-down political implementation. Except in the case of executive staff, the LRSD failed to pursue appropriate implementation strategies.

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